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LOOKING on with amusement, Mr. Haynes 
watches closely the boy's tennis team. 

DUE to computer error and indecision on the part 
of students, crowds in the Guidance office 
swamped the counselors with schedule changes. 

ON their way to another contest the Albion 
Marching Band took time to perform at half-time 
during the Lawrence game. 



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2/JMHS Crowd 





hat do you call it when you jam 
2,517 students into a building designed 
for considerably fewer bodies? Well, at 
38th and Mitthoeffer, we called it the 
JMHS Crowd. 

Elbowing your way up the circular 
main halls stairs was no small achieve- 
ment. And if you dropped a pencil, book 
or contact lens, it was considered gone 
to high school heaven. Who had time to 
eat lunch if your group was called the 
last ten minutes? A parking space near 
the front door? That's a fantasy! Hiking 
became a popular students intramural 
sport. 

And only the computer could solve 



FINDING a pathway to your class is just one of 
the many problems caused by overcrowding. 



THE unexpected enrollment of nearly 2500 stu- 
dents has resulted in problems in both in and out 
of school. 




how to fit 47 desks into a classroom 
built for 36 last fall. But it all worked 
out. Enrollment and teachers and lock- 
ers and parking spaces and lunch passes 
finally matched. 

On the plus side of all this humanity 
walking Marshall halls was the student 
involvement. Attendance was up at ath- 
letic events. In fact, getting a decent 
spot to sit for you and your 47 closest 
friends often took war games strategy. 
Clubs flourished. Teams won. This was 
The JMHS Crowd of '78. 

By Martha Wright 



THE 




JMHS Crowd/3 



JUST as important as the cheerleaders are the 
Patriot Personalities to lend spirit to Marshall 
fans. 

BILL Mitchell and Darla Forbis competed with 
more than twenty students to become Marshall's 
official representatives, Patriot Personality. 




4/ Patriots 




i . , If t 




Personalities Speak 



et's get fired up!", "Hi, Betsy 
Ross!", cheering in the rain, new expe- 
riences and new responsibilities, meet- 
ing many new people. Memories such as 
these will stay with me forever. I really 
feel privileged that I have had the op- 
portunity to help boost the spirit at 
Marshall. I just hope the future Patriot 
Personalities will have as much fun and 
get as much out of it as Bill and I have. 

Darla Forbis 



This year as Patriot Personality I have 
been able to represent the school at 
many of the athletic events whether I 
was in costume or just as a spectator. 
Being able to cheer for a winning school 
has been my most pleasant task. I have 
also represented the school in meetings, 
school events, and schoolwide produc- 
tions. I never really knew John Marshall 
had so many devoted students. I would 
like to thank the students and teachers 
of this school for making my job as Pa- 
triot Personality such an enjoyable 
experience. 

Bill Mitchell 



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Patriots/ 5 




TWO summer school students work on the floor 
board of a truck in auto body. Students are 
taught skills that will benefit them in later years. 

SOPHOMORE Joe Birkla smoothes things out in 
autobody. The well-equipped shop area provides 
many students a how-to-do course in auto 
maintenance. 

GIRLS Physical Ed is always a popular summer 
course for incoming freshmen. 

SMILE . . . you're on Cheatham's camera. Mike 
took photography in summer school with Mr. Ed 
Ring. Mike is Student Council President. 





6/Summer school 







t 







Good ol' 
summer school 



"UJhat's wrong with good ol' sum- 
mer school?" Perhaps, getting up at 
6:30 on a bright, hot, sunny day and 
going to two classes that last from 8:00 
until 12:00 has something to do with it. 
As usual the most popular classes were 
drivers education and health for bud- 
ding drivers, and gym and orientation 
for eager freshmen. Most classes be- 
came boring after the first week but 
with the help of ten minute breaks and 
junk food supplied by vending machines 
in the cafeteria, most students were 
content. But now let's take a lighter 
look at summer school. Marshall has 
one of the top enrollments for summer 
school education because it had a vari- 
ety of classes offered. And, believe it or 
not, many students find summer school 
"alright". Also there are those who find 
it as "something to do in the summer". 
From a logical point of view, I guess you 
could say: NOTHING'S wrong with good 
ol' summer school. 

by Julie Bush 



HERE the Drivers Ed students wonder if A.J. Foyt 
started this way as they practice their driving 
skills on the simulators. 

MICHAEL Mclnterney practices the precision 
techniques learned in his summer photography 
class. 



Summer school/7 



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hrough the quiet of the back- 
stage, the stage crew, the assistant are 
all at work. The stage crew sets up the 
stage to look like a farm, the assistant 
director and his assistant makes a 
check of the people on stage. 

This is the opening night of 
"Oklahoma". 

The assistant director and the prop 
manager both notice there is no sign on 
the back of the surry for the final 
scene. 

The curtain starts to rise. The first 
act starts. They start some quick sign 
painting. "You dope you spelled "just" 
wrong, it's J-U-S-T." "Yes, it is, look in 
the script J-I-S-T MARRIED see?!" 
"OK" The signs hung on the surry 
which now has a flat tire. "We do it 
again, Saturday!" 

by Mike Dye 




JANET Duncan, playing the part of Aunt Eller, 
looks through the peep-hole of the rough and 
tough cowboys Little Wonder. 

BARON Dunn and Richard Wampler are learning 
the artistry of applying make-up, as Dunn pre- 
pares Wampler to go on stage. 

HERE, the Oklahoma honeys wait for some fine 
gentlemen to come courtin' them. 



8/Musical 




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WHILE part of the stage crew are working hard behind the scene, Laurey, 
played by Beth Dine, is intrigued by the suave kiss of Ali Hakem in the musi- 
cal "Oklahoma". 




CAST 



Curly Darren Harrison 

Laurey Beth Dine 

Ado Annie Sandy Shaw 

Aunt Eller Janet Duncan 

Will Parker Brian Holmes 

Jud Fry Dan Devine 

Ali Hakim Bob Wray 

Gerite Cummins Laura Spires 

Andrew Carnes Jeff Mockbee 

Ike Skidmore Ed Allseitz 

Slim Mark Brown 

Cord Elam Tim Goff 

Ellen Marcy Kerr 

Vivien ne Bonnie Star 

Virgin nia Linda Weiglein 

Faye Patsy McDowell 

Kate Beverly Engelking 

Joan Reida Myers 

Suzanne Dotti Vincel 

Paul John Adams 



Eddie Brad Wikie 

Joe Rickie Leslie 

Ray Richard Warn pier 

Jack Joe Burns 

DREAM BALLET: 

Dream Curly Ron Morgan 

Dream Jud Rich Wampler 

Dream Laurey Kellee Meyer 

Pigtail Dancers: 

Robyn Venable, Beverly Venable 

Fall Down Dancers 

Lynn Royce 

Cape Girls: 

Malinda Cox, Mary Southgate 

Postcard Girls: 

Bev Engelking, Reida Meyers, Kim Couse 

CHORUS: Lisa Stevens, Mona Cox. Linda Curry, 

Missy Miller, Sandy Frye, Colette Darling, Mary 

Crouch, Scott Howell, Richard Smith, Mike 

Blaydoe. Emory Robinson, Bob Weaver 



Musical/9 




GLAD to return to the JMHS crowd was senior 
Larry Lynch who had been injured in a wrestling 
accident. October was truly Homecoming for him 
and his many friends. 

CHUCK takes a ride to get a different viewpoint of 
his world. He's only one of the live animals in the 
Zoology room. 

TOTALLY bored with the opposing team, these 
Marshall Patriot fans await the arrival of their 
team. 






10/JMHS Crowd 





B 



eing part of the JMHS crowd 
had its advantages. Where else could 
you meet Chuck and Philster? Everyone 
who took science knew them. 

Chuck the lizard ate dandelions and 
insects. His six-inch gray-colored, loose, 
puffy-skinned frame crawled around the 
tree limbs. 

Philster the skunk pranced around 
and investigated purses and friends, al- 
ways on the lookout for a handout. Eat- 
ing homecoming corsages and going 
wild over her vitamins wasn't unusual 
for her. When she took a walk on her 
leash, she, too, became part of the 
JMHS crowd. 



THE 

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IrouiD 




THESE senior powderpuff cheerleaders of B & R's "HMM ... I wonder what we're going to do in 
Big Red Machine have an enthusiastic spirit for English today," states Philster. Her curiosity 

their team. earned her friends and foes. 




JMHS Crowd/11 





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Homecoming Crown 



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I t was the evening of 
Friday October 14, 1977. The 
stands, crowded with old and 
new fans, were filled with ex- 
pectation. Graduates chanted 
"We are the class . . .". This 
was Marshall's 11th Home- 
coming game. 

The night's activities began 
before the game with the an- 
nual float competition. The win- 
ning floats led the parade. The 
juniors won the class com- 
petition with the theme "Patri- 



ots are Hot to Trot". The Choir 
class won in the subject cate- 
gory and best club float was 
won by the Spanish club. 

After the band led the au- 
dience in the National Anthem 
the game began. Hopes were 
high for a Patriot victory. The 
first and second quarters were 
over, it was halftime. The band 
along with the patriettes and 
majorettes began the show with 
a few of their routines. Then 
the queen candidates toured 




12/ Homecoming 



goestoTamiDownton 



the track— Tamara Downton, 
Sharon Hidalgo, Sheila Malone, 
Tonya Slaughter, and Vicki 
Williams. 

A hush went over the bleach- 
ers as Doc Weaver announced 
"The 1977 Homecoming Queen 
is, Miss . . ." The tension was 
broken when he said, "Well, I 
had that envelope a minute ago. 
Ah, here it is. Miss . . ." The 
band played. "Tamara Down- 
ton!" Mr. Haynes took the 
crown from '76 Queen Penny 



Thompson and crowned the 
new queen. The show was 
brought to an end with an im- 
pressive display of fireworks 
sponsored by the Student 
Council members who had col- 
lected money for two weeks. 

The second half started then. 
The third quarter was over, the 
fourth quarter was over— Mar- 
shall 0, Chatard 28. 





THE students at Marshall worked many hard 
nights on the Homecoming floats. The Juniors' 
float won the class award for first place, with the 
theme "Pats are Hot to Trot". 



Homecoming/ 13 



Patty toils 
for pennies 



he bell rings at JMHS, ending 
another school day for Patty Patriot. 
She forces her way through the cram- 
med hallways to get to her locker. She 
stares blindly into space, wondering 
what books to take home. 

Patty runs down the stairs and out to 
the parking lot to her car. She and her 
four riders pile in and race to get into 
the daily dodgem game to get out of 
the student lot. 

Getting her blue-striped uniform, she 
pulls it over her head. After grabbing a 
bite to eat. she looks at the clock to 
find she has ten minutes to get to work. 

Patty clocks in at the ice cream parlor 
while her boss says, "Hi, Patty. Will you 
clean the ice cream case?" 

"All right", says Patty disheartingly 
as she starts on the job she hates 
doing, but she reminds herself that she 
needs this job, so she can buy all the 
extra things she wants. 

As the night progresses Patty keeps 
telling herself, "I need this job! If I 
don't have a job, how will I buy tickets 
to the ball games, supplies for school 
and everything else?" 

Patty keeps herself busy for the rest 
of her shift by waiting on customers, 
cleaning cabinets and washing dishes. 9 
p.m. rolls by and it's time for her to get 
off work. She finishes the dishes, clocks 
out and heads for her car. Pulling up 
into the driveway, Patty slowly walks 
into the house where she plops exhaust- 
edly into the nearest chair. 

Patty Patriot is an example of work- 
ing student. Some students may like 
their jobs, while others may hate them, 
but they all work for one reason: EX- 
TRA MONEY! 

by Mary Crouch 

EVEN though it's been a hard day, Kim King can 
still manage a smile for her customers at Burger 
Chef. Fast food services employ many students. 

WHILE sacking groceries at Preston-Safeway, 
Julie Shepherd and Bob Williams find something 
to laugh about. Both are active in school 
activities. 




Jobs/14 





MARK Bristow learns that the art of pizza making 
is a lot of hard work and is extremely fun! He also 
cooks shrimp and chicken. 

ON her break in the stock room Paulette Law be- 
comes the queen of watermelons. Only the 
thought of extra money needs keeps kids on the 
job. 



Jobs/15 







16/Activities 



B 



rian Johnson, Ottawa, Explorer 
Scout, John Marshall senior. Knowing 
who you are— that's important. In the 
American Indian Council of Indianapolis 
among my activities is the Pow-Wow. 

The Indian Pow-Wow is part of mod- 
ern Indian culture that reflects the 
pride of tradition and heritage. These 
gatherings are the only means an urban 
Indian has to contact his own society. 
Basically, a Pow-Wow is the highlight of 
Indian social life where almost every as- 
pect of Indian lifestyle can be found- 
traditional dancing, singing, dress, food, 
and lodging. An average dance length is 
about four hours. Specific styles of 
singing and dancing vary. Among the 
dances are the War Dance, The Snake, 
and Buffalo Dance, the Two-Step and 
the Trot Dance. 



Another aspect of the Pow-Wow are 
the stands and booths which display 
and sell jewelry, beads, feathers, buck- 
skins and moccasins. The trading posts 
provide both an insight into Indian cul- 
ture and a livelihood for the traders. 
Food booths sell fried bread, blanket 
dogs and corn soup. 

After-hour activities include a 49 
which is a type of younger generation 
party named for 49 Indians who died in 
a plane crash on their way to a Pow- 
Wow. In a 49, songs have English verses 
and everyone sings and has a good 
time. 

Many misconceptions of Indian lodg- 
ing are shattered when one has a 
chance to see a real Indian tipi. Few re- 
alize that the tipi is a product of cen- 
turys of engineering which has per- 



fected one of the most durable types of 
shelter. All tipis face east. 

The Indian Council of Indianapolis is 
one of several Indian organizations in 
the country whose goal is to preserve 
Indian heritage. Indianapolis members 
include Ottawa, Ghippewa, Sioux and 
Cherokee. Presently the council is on a 
membership drive to get more Indians 
active in knowing their culture as well to 
raise the conscious thinking levels of 
non-Indians about Indian problems. 

The International Festival, Pow Wows 
in Illinois, Michigan, Missouri and Ohio 
are a few I have attended. Battle- 
ground, near Lafayette, is the site of 
one of the largest Pow-Wows in 
Indiana. 



By Brian Johnson 




THE smoke flaps of an Indian tipi provides protection from harsh 
weather, and also serves as a ventilating system. Tipis always face 
east. 

IN anticipation of the next song Charles Fasthorse, a Sioux Indian, 
prepares himself for another set of Northern war dances at the 
Pow-Wow at Military Park last fall. 






Activities/ 17 






Pat's Night School oneof metro's best 



M 



arshall's night school has always 
been one of the largest and well- 
rounded evening schools in the In- 
dianapolis area. However enrollment has 
decreased due to the opening of Warren 
Central's night school program. Mar- 
shall's has made an effort to increase 
their enrollment by offering a new early 
schedule and reducing the price per 
class. 

Night school's primary function is to 
provide an opportunity for students to 
complete their education without inter- 



fering with daytime employment that 
the pupil may be involved in. Adults or 
teenagers over sixteen who have not 
completed high school may enroll in ac- 
ademic courses such as math, or 
English in order to complete their grad- 
uation requirements. Another function 
is for seniors who have failed or have 
not taken a class required for gradu- 
ation, such as government, to pick up 
this course in night school for the stu- 
dent to graduate with their class. Still 
another reason for entering night 




school is to take a class like Chemistry, 
which the student had not taken when 
in high school but needs now to enter 
college. 

In addition to the academic classes 
offered, the evening school division 
prides itself .on its personal interest 
courses which range from upholstery to 
drivers education. These classes are 
taken by pupils who are interested in 
improving skills or just getting started 
in a new hobby. 

Clifford Snyder, director of Evening 
School, commented "The Adult Evening 
School gives working-married people 
the opportunity to continue their educa- 
tional needs and interests by attending 
evening high school. Students who find 
opportunities for day employment can 
continue their education by transfering 
to the evening program." 

— Doneva Wheeler 



PERSONAL interest courses like ceramics, are 
still another important part of the Evening School 
Division. 

JOAN Dyke, Debbie Nelson, Joan Russell, Patty 
Spaulding, Mona Cox, Paul Hayes, Don Austin, 
Clifford Snyder. 





PAUL Snyder, director of Marshalls' Night 
School, looks over a new students schedule. 

MR. Harvey's government class is always good for 
a few laughs as these night school students 
discover. 

LEARNING a valuable skill is an important part of 
the Evening division. These ladies study short- 
hand, an important part of secretarial work. 

ANOTHER valuable skill is bookkeeping, taught by 
Mr. Wright. 

THESE ladies are studying the part of an auto- 
mobile motor in Powder Puff Mechanics, a course 
designed to teach women about cars. 




Night School/19 



BAND member Chip Jacobs shows his school spirit not only by marching with 
the band but by chanting cheers as well 



TOM Hayden, the drum major, calls the 
marching band to attention so they can per- 
form one of their many formations. 

STRIPPING a banana was one of the many 
halftime shows the band performed at the 
home games. 




Band 
marches 



on 



omething new has happened 
this year besides more band members 
and different music. It's Robert Erick- 
son, the new band director. Erickson 
came to Marshall after graduating in 
May of 1977 from Butler University 
where his major was the tuba. 

The 56 band members began prac- 
ticing August 15. Then every afternoon 
throughout the season, but Erickson 
said, "Although the band has come a 
long way it has a long way to go before 
it reaches the top." 



The Marching Band participated in 
many events this year including the CYO 
Contest, Butler Band Day, Veteran's 
Day Parade and all home football 
games. 

It took a lot of hard work and pa- 
tience to design and perform the new 
and exciting routines the band did this 
year. Saturdays became contest day. 
Experience and trophies were collected. 
Band members and the Band Boosters 
grew in pride and achievement. 



20/Band 



Halftime begins with new look 



I he halftime shows at football and 
basketball games were livened up by the 
talented Patriettes and Majorettes. 

Cynthia Featheringill was the Patri- 
ettes' sponsor this year. She decided to 
become the sponsor because there was 
a desire to keep the Patriettes in the 
Music Department, since they are con- 
sidered a part of the band. 

"I was asked to take them over, and I 
like doing extracurricular activities any- 
way!" said Featheringill. 

With the help of captain, Linda Todd 



and co-captains Terri Allen and Debbie 
Barcus, Featheringill created new and 
different routines every week. To bring 
it all together, the Patriettes practiced 
everyday. 

This years Patriettes were Terri Allen, 
Debbie Barcus, Kelley Beck, Judy 
Campbell, Cindy Chilcte, Debbie Cline, 
Tami Downton, Alice Graat, Amy Hunt, 
Cheryl Morris, Leanne Morris, Shelis 
Mullins, Lynne Royce, Theresa Shelby, 
Cheryl Tiffany, Linda Todd, Lori Waller, 
Cathy Wampler and Susan Watson. 



The Majorettes also participated in 
the halftime shows. The two Major- 
ettes, Denise VonAxleson and Mary 
Miller, were sponsored by Karen 
French, a graduate of Warren Central 
and who now attends Butler University, 
where she is also a Majorette. 

The Patriettes and Majorettes suc- 
cessfully represented JMHS not only at 
the home football and basketball games 
but, also at contests as well. 




CYNTHIA Featheringill, this year's sponsor for the 
Patriettes, enjoys herself watching the halftime 
show. 

STANDING at attention, Lynne Royce looks very 
nervous as she patiently waits for the band to be- 
gin playing. 



Band/21 



Mike, Tonya 
will be missed 



I he boys track team finished 
fourth in a 20-team sectional and won 
8 meets out of 13 in '77 season. The 
expectations for the '78 season were 
even better. 

The team had the services of return- 
ing lettermen, Michael Pollard, Rudy 
Williams, Marcus Dunlop and many 
other outstanding trackmen. 

The strongest areas on the team were 
the sprints and hurdles. Michael Pol- 
lard, Ricky Wilson, Ken Haskens and 
Kevin Vardamen set a new school 
record in the 880-yard relay. A school 
record was set in the mile relay. 

Coach Desmond Smith, along with 
field event coach Lester Bivens and dis- 
tance coach Greg Cook, were hoping to 
go all the way in the sectional and bring 
back down some trophies to Marshall in 
78. 

TANYA Slaughter, showing excellent form, breaks 
out of the starting blocks first, on the way to an- 
other victory in the hurdles. 






W ' 



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\ 





JAMES Degraphenreed competing in the long 
jump at Tech High School takes a long hop and 
strains to victory. 



22/Sports 




COACHES Martha Griffin along with other mem- 
bers of the girls team, receives important premeet 
instructions from one of the judges. 



The girls track team coached by Mar- 
tha Griffen sturggled to a five win— four 
loss season. Led by star hurdler Tonya 
Slaughter the team started fast, win- 
ning four of their five meets, but dimin- 
ished by dropping their last two. Ac- 
cording to Coach Griffen the reason for 
the poor finish was the team's weakness 
in the field events. 

However, they could look forward to 
the future with the help of talented 
freshmen plus the return of many out- 
standing tracksters from the '77 
season. 



by Brian Fanning 
and Scott Worpell 




TOM Carson running in one of the long distances 
races is easily outdistancing his Howe-Coached 
opponents. 



Sports/23 




24/Track 







JUNIOR Ricky Wilson running in one of the sprint 
events catches and passes his Manual opponent, 
then steps on the brakes. 

LAVELLA Phelps makes a rough three point land- 
ing after competing in the long jump. 

JAMES Degraphenreed shows the take off 
part of long jumping on his way to a powerful 
leap through the air. 



Track/25 




EXPERIENCE and a good eye tells senior Russel Dorsey to hold up and let a GRADUATE John Featheringill shows his fiery pitching attack that proved to 
low pitch slide by. Strong hitters like Dorsey Kept opponents on their toes. be a majn element jn tnis years team Hjs graduat jon left a spot open that 

will take talent to fill. 



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26/Sports 




DOING his part for the team, Coach Bob Tremain assists graduate Mike Rodman with insight for fin- 
ishing the play. Tremain's enthusiasm and coaching abilities were very evident during his second year 
as varsity coach. 



Runners-up in 
City Tourney 



ollowing traditional standards, 
the baseball teams were major forces in 
the fight for the city championship. 
"The '77 team did very well considering 
a big graduation loss (6 seniors), said 
Varsity Coach Bob Tremain. Out- 
standing work done by John Feather- 
ingill; infielder Kurt Guldner; catcher 
Pat Mayfield; and outfielder Doug 
Whyde pushed the young team to an 18 
and 11 win-loss record. Beating Ritter, 
Northwest, and Roncalli in their fight 
for city championship, but losing to 
Chatard in the final game left the Patri- 
ots City runners-ups. 

Coach Tremain and his assistant Dave 
Clapp expect a good '78 year feeling 
that the team will be competitive with 
anyone. The strength of the team are 
speed, a good defense, and a potentially 
strong hitting and pitching attack. Also, 
he has a young and enthusiastic squad 
which plays good team ball. Even more 
progress is expected with the help of 
amazingly strong underclassmen taking 
positions open on the varsity level. 

The J.V. squad under direction of 
Coach Brad Goffinet piled up a note 
worthy win-loss record of 14 and 3 to 
become City Runnerups. 

by Brian Fanning 




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Sports/27 




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J.VHquad •*- 



^^ uccess was attributed to the 
fact that most of the squad had played 
together for a few years and had much 
team pride. Coach Goffinet thought that 
the players were out to play baseball 
and were determined not to quit. Goffi- 
net is very optimistic but admits it's 
hard to predict what will happen this 
year. 

The freshmen team had an average 
year with 5 wins and 4 losses. Coached 
by Bill Baugh, the team is expected to 
improve with the help of more swingers 
for the offensive attack. 

tHHW! 





VARSITY BASEBALL-BOTTOM ROW: Tim McCoy, Pat Mayfield. SECOND ROW: Doug Whyde, Scott Car- 
der, Mike Rodman, Jeff Gosnell, Denis Johnson. TOP ROW: Coach Brad Goffinet, Jack Edwards, Greg Agee, 
Joe Devore, John Featheringill, Russel Dorsey, Kurt Guldner, Dan Stockhoff, Coach Bob Tremain 

JUNIOR VARSITY-BOTTOM ROW: Doug Herr, Robert Davids, Chris Pritchett, Jim Huston, Keith Jones, 
Dan Stephens, Eddie Parrot. TOP ROW: Coach Brad Goffinet, Landon McBride, Steve Thomas, Mike Kid- 
well, Scott Holden, Dan Schluge, Bill Ruston, Brent VonDuyn, Jim Cross. 



SENIOR Scott Carder watches the flight of the 
ball as he leaves home plate in a varsity contest. 







28/ Baseball 









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Baseball/ 29 




JUNIOR Jay Burleson and Linda Christensen show 
JOAN Kane concentrates Intensely on serving the SOPHOMORE Brent VanDuyn puts his mark on a the style that was essential to the teams' out- 
ball, thereby leading the team to another victory. return. standing performance. 




riiw||0'4' 

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TENNIS Team: (Girls) TOP ROW: Coach Duane Farris, Kathy Weaver, Karen Wever, Tammy Holden, Linda 
Christensen, Trisha Montgomery, Renee Lacy, Lois Icard, Coach Linda James. BOTTOM ROW: Lynette 
Birdsong, Joyce Baunsbauch, Lynda Stucker, Shelia Malone, Kim Williams, Brenda Walls. 



30/Tennis 





Reed takes 
City Tourney 



iarly in the season Coach John 
Eason had prospects for his team to be 
city champs, and he wasn't far off in his 
speculations. As a team the patriots 
captured the title of city-runners up. 
Leading the team was senior Doug 
Reed who overwhelmed his opponents 
at number one singles to earn his City- 
Champion status. Other netters for 
Marshall include seniors Bruce Everett 
and Wes Gentry playing second and 
third singles, respectively; senior Bob 
Keaffaber and sophomore Brent Van- 
Duyn at number one doubles and Chris 
Pritchett and Jay Burleson filled the 
number two doubles spot. 

Much of the team's success was at- 
tributed to experience and practice. A 
tennis summer school class gave the 
players, both boys and girls, a chance 
for pre-season play. 

Under the direction of new coaches, 
Duane Farris and Linda James, the 
girls' tennis team turned their record 
from one win the season before to a 6- 
6 season this year. "The girls did well 
considering their lack of experience," 
said Coach Farris. Female netters 
should have an even better season 
ahead of them with five returning. 




TENNIS Team (Boys)TOP ROW: John Purcell, Bob Keaffaber, Chris Pritchett, Denny Hallam, Mike Wa- 
lenge, Brent VanDuyn, Jeff Smith, Coach John Eason. MIDDLE ROW: Jay Burleson, Doug Reed, Jim Hus- 
ton, Bruce Everett, Wes Gentry. BOTTOM ROW: Wes Gainey, Todd VanDuyn, Mike Williams. 




NI0R Lynda Stucker. 



Tennis/31 



Turnabout and Prom are successful 



W tarry Night '77" and "We've 
Only Just Begun" were the themes of 
the two major dances last spring. The 
Turnabout dance is sponsored by Publi- 
cations and the Prom is for juniors and 
seniors. 

Indiana Purchase (Larry Sims, Ron 
Boggs and David and Frank Puckutt) 
played for The Turnabout while Stones 
Crossing played for the Prom in The 
500 Ball Room at the Convention 
Center. 



Bill Bramell and Kathy Worley were 
elected Prom King and Queen. Other 
queen candidates were Diana Christ, 
Yvonne Rivers, Karen Schroder and 
Michelle Zukoski. King candidates in- 
cluded Mike Medford, Pat Mayfield, 
Mike McCarthy and Steve Pennybaker. 

Shooting stars and silver stars hang- 
ing from the ceiling were the major 
decorations nearly 300 students en- 
joyed in the school cafeteria. Punch and 
homemade cookies were served at the 



turnabout. 

Balloons filled with 1977 pennies cas- 
caded over the ballroom floor to the 
delight of the nearly 500 students. The 
Senior Prom committee were Sue 
Erickson, Chairman Diana Christ, 
Brenda Carr, Theresa Jones and Yo- 
landa Pettigrew, Debbie Duncan and 
Kathy Foreman. Tickets were nine dol- 
lars for the May 13 event. 

Attendance was up for both the for- 
mal dances. 




KATHY Martin, Vicky Early and Kelly Wisemen 
serve punch to Tina Burkes and her date after 
they finished a whirl on the dance floor. 

FOUR Marshall graduates make up the band "In 
diana Purchase" who played for the 1977 turn- 
about "Starry Nights". 



32/Spring Dance 




~s 




KATHY Worley's eyes well with tears of happiness 
as Kathy Foreman crowns her Prom Queen of the 
1977 Prom. "We've Only Just Begun". Looking on 
are Michelle Zukoski and Kirt Guldner. 

CLUTCHING her rose, senior Karen Schroder 
smiles joyfully after her date, Bill Bramell has 
been crowned Prom King. 

BALLOONS holding shiny new 1977 pennies drift 
slowly from the ceiling of the 500 Ballroom at the 
closing of the Prom. 



Spring Dance /33 



Music classes T 



give students 
wide variety 



PATSY McDowell watches fellow singers during a 
break in her part. Strict attention must be paid to 
other member's part or else she might miss her 
clue. 

ROBERT Weaver is obviously upset with his sing- 
ing partner. A missed note is not to be forgiven or 
forgotten. 



o many students the music de- 
partment consists only of marching 
band on Friday nights and Marshallaires 
at Christmas time, but this is simply not 
true. The wide range of classes offered 
enables the music student to spend up 
to four periods in the music wing, pro- 
viding him with a hobby that will last 
the rest of his life. 

Perhaps the most least understood 
performing groups at Marshall are the 
various singing groups. Singing may ap- 
pear to be easy to someone not involved 
in it, but much time and effort is 
needed to perfect an act then put the 
act in a show. Many students with their 
hearts set on becoming members of one 
of these groups have walked away dis- 
appointed; for, the rigid standards set 
for these groups clearly show that they 
are not for everybody. All prospective 



members must audition before Cynthia 
Featheringill, music teacher, in order to 
achieve membership. The musical 
groups at Marshall include the Mar- 
shallaires, Sons of Liberty, Liberty 
Bells, Choir, and Concert Choir. In addi- 
tion to the shows at school, which most 
of us are familiar with, the groups quite 
often perform around the community. 
Recently for example, the Marshallaires 
journeyed to Eastgate Shopping Center 
to perform a concert in the mall. 

The number of different bands is also 
surprising to those of us who are unfa- 
miliar with the music department. These 
include A band, B band C band for stu- 
dents with varying degrees of experi- 
ence. The orchestra is growing in num- 
bers. Piano and guitar may be offered 
soon. 




COLLETTE Darling practices 
singing a routine during her 
second period music class. 
Many students spend up to 
four periods in music class. 



34/Music 







MEMBERS of the music department; Cynthia PUTTING movement into her singing, Laura CYNTHIA Featheringill, vocal director, gives some 

Featheringill, Kenya Brooks, Robert Erickson, Spires uses her hands and arms to help her carry pointers to some members of the Marshallaires. 
Raymond Brandes, department head. a long note. 




Choral groups 
have variety 



I here were many choral groups in 
the JMHS music department that par- 
ticipated in extra-curricular activities as 
well as in the classroom. For freshmen 
there was both a freshman boys and a 
freshmen girls choir. The girls were di- 
rected by Cynthia Featheringill and the 
boys by Robert Erickson. Each group 
sang in the Christmas program and Cav- 
alcade of Music. 

Another choral group in the JMHS 
music department was the Concert 
Club, an all-girl group directed by Ray- 
mond Brandes. The Concert Club also 
participated in the Christmas program 
and Cavalcade of Music. The Glee Club, 
directed by Featheringill, was a mixed 
group and this was the first year it 
existed in the JMH Music Department. 

The Concert Choir was the largest of 
the groups. Performances were the "fi- 
nals" for these groups who learned 
theory and technique in their classes. 




ACCOMPANIST Kenya Brooks helped the Music Department this year by playing at all the programs for 
the choral groups and ensembles. 



CYNTHIA Featheringill, directs the Concert Choir as they sing their many songs at the JMHS Annual 
Christmas Program. 




36/Choir 







THE JMHS CONCERT CHOIR: Front Row: Officers- Laura Spires-Secretary, Warren Smith-Co-Presi- 
dent, Donna Adams— Co- President, Bob Weaver— Sgt.-at-Arms and Tami Prunty— Junior 
Representative. 



THE Glee Club, directed by Cynthia Featheringill, sang many songs at the Annual Christmas Program 
and Cavalcade of Music. 




Raymond Brandes 



Cynthia Featheringill 



Robert Erickson 



Kenya Brooks 



Choir/37 




SONS OF LIBERTY: Baron Dunn, John McFarland, Tony Hoskins, Greg Williamsons, Rickey Leslie, Ed Allseitz, Joe Burns, Emory Robinson, 
Charels Alums, James Dennis. 



THE Marshallaires rehearse their song and dance routine many times before they perform before an audience. 










38/Music 




Music groups 
sing on 

I lany questions were raised as to 
exactly what was a Marshallaire, a Lib- 
erty Belle, or a Son of Liberty? These 
three groups belonged to JMHS music 
department and were directed by Cyn- 
thia Featheringill. Each was a class 
earning a half credit per semester and 
was an extracurricular activity. 

These three ensembles spent a lot of 
time and energy preparing and per- 
forming their songs and routines. The 
Marshallaires, Sons of Liberty and Lib- 
erty Belles performed in Patriots on Pa- 
rade, Cavalcade of Music, grade schools 
and nursing homes at Christmas, and 
many other programs. 

The Marshallaires was the only mixed 
singing group which had eight gals and 
eight guys. The Sons of Liberty was the 
male ensemble which had twelve guys, 
and the Liberty Belles was the female 
ensemble composed of twelve girls. 
Each ensemble had its own individual 
sound. 

It took a lot of hard work and dedica- 
tion to be a Marshallaire, Liberty Belle 
or Son of Liberty. The students who 
participated in the ensembles should be 
proud of their outstanding perfor- 
mances throughout the year. 



Mary Crouch 



MARSHALLAIRES: TOP ROW: David McDonald, Bob Williams. MIDDLE ROW: Curt McDowell, Bill DuVall, Bob Weaver, Mark Brown, War- 
ren Smith, Mike Satterfield, John Adams, Gary Davis. FRONT ROW: Elaine Day, Patsy McDowell, Michele Mattingly, Cindy Lutocka, Donna 
Adams, Rieda Meyers, Lisa Stevens, Linda Wiglein. 




Music/39 



. 



More Pats 
Join Orchestra 



major section of the music de- 
partment was the orchestra ted by Ray- 
mond Brandes. The orchestra consisted 
of approximately 37 students, earning 
one half credit each semester. 

The orchestra was very busy this year 
with the production of "South Pacific." 
The play took place in March and the 
orchestra supplied the excellent musical 
score. 

Several students from the John Mar- 
shall orchestra participated in the 
twenty-first annual concert of the In- 
dianapolis High School symphony in 
January. The musicians that took part 
in this important concert were as fol- 
lows: Cherry Brown— Viola, Micheal Sat- 
terfield— violin, Kym Webster— violin, 
Pricilla Perkins— violin, Andrea Perry- 
flute, Cathy Scott-flute, Gary Davis- 
horn, and Calvin Yeakey— oboe. 

The orchestra also took part in the 
annual spring Cavalcade of Music. Sev- 
eral members participated in the Dis- 
trict Solo and Ensemble contest at 
Cresten Jr. High School in February. 




DIRECTED by Robert Erickson, the Cadet Band (B Band) brought in the Christmas spirit with their 
many songs at the Christmas program. 



DIRECTOR Robert Erickson has the Cadet Band stand to take a bow after their wonderful 
performance. 




WHILE marching in the Veteran's Day Parade 
Drum Major Tom Hayden brings the band to 
order. 



40/ Band-Orchestra 




Patriots 
Make Music 



I he John Marshall High School 
music department was not only com- 
posed of string and choral sections, but 
band was also a part of the music de- 
partment. There were five major bands: 
Symphonic Band, Cadet B Band, Inter- 
mediate Band, Beginning Band and 
Marching Band. There were approxi- 
mately 115 band members, and each 
student earned Vi credit per semester. 

New band director Robert Erickson 
has been busy this year in scheduling 
performances for each of the bands. 

The Symphonic Band (A Band) par- 
ticipated in the Christmas Concert, Cav- 
alcade of Music, the State Band Con- 
test (Group I Entry) and a grade school 
tour. 

The Cadet Band (B Band) partici- 
pated in the Christmas Concert, Cav- 
alcade of Music, and the State Band 
Contest (Group III Entry). The Inter- 
mediate Band also performed in Cav- 
alcade of Music. 

The Marching Band performed many 
times throughout the 77-78 school 
year. Marching Band supplied half-time 
entertainment at home football and 
basketball games. They also participated 
in Butler University's Band Day, Catho- 
lic Youth Organization, Marching Con- 
test (Division I Rating). Indiana School 
Music Association District Marching 
Contest (Division II Rating), and Butler 
University basketball games. 



ORCHESTRA: TOP ROW: Harold Anderson, John Ingraham, Michael Dellinger, Richard Black, Lionel 
Butler, Bob Williams, Tony Black. SECOND ROW: Calvin Yeakey, Suzanne Spradlin, Faith Freije, Lisa 
Browne, Mary Rose, Kathy Hawthorne, Dawna Weeks, Vicki Quinn, Vicki York, Linda Moore. BOTTOM 
ROW: Pricilla Perkins, Alicia Phillips, Kym Webster, Cherry Brown, Michael Satterfield, Liane Holder, 
Vickie Weeks, Ellen Sinders, Nancy Williams. 




Band-0rchestra/41 




SOPHOMORE Chip Jacobs really got into his song of "Blue Suede Shoes 
and the girls screamed and screamed. 



THE Liberty Belles get on board their train to go back home. The all-girl 
group made their own outfits. 



BEVERLY Hubbard and James Dennis backed Ethel Anderson in her original 
Gospel Song. 




42/POP 



11th Annual Patriots on Parade a hit 



I he night was filled with tense- 
ness and excitement as the time grew 
nearer to showtime. The stage crew 
plus the cast of the talent show were 
running around making last minute 
preperations. 

"Does anyone have an extra pair of 
hose? I have a run in mine ! ! !" 

"Everyone report to room 162! 
Feather and Eberle want to talk to us." 

As the reminders were given by the 
directors, everyone was getting more 
nervous by the minute. Good lucks were 
shouted as the first acts headed for the 
stage. 

The audience became still as the un- 
forgettable voice of Mike Cheatham 

MIKE Cheatham, the M.C., introduced each act with 
Magnificent also performed "Magic". 



welcomed the people to the "11th an- 
nual Patriots on Parade." THE SHOW 
HAD BEGUN! 

"Where's the Marshallares? They're 
on next!" 
"Listen to that applause!" 
"We have a goooood audience!" 
"I'm nervous, we go on next!" 
This year's talent show was one of 
the best that was ever put on at JMHS 
judging by the screams. 

There were more acts this year than 
ever before, acts such as Chip Jacobs 
singing "Blue Suede Shoes", the Mar- 
shallaires, Liberty Belles, Sons of Lib- 
erty, and the Concert Choir. The Un- 
known Comic, The Gospel Group, the 



Boogie-Woogie singers and soloists 
Donna Adams, Warren Smith, and Lisa 
Reed were just a few. 

"Gosh, it's almost over!" yelled 
Feather as she ran backstage. 
"Concert Choir! You're next!" 
With the end of the song, the rest of 
the cast ran on stage. Mike thanked the 
audience for coming and the cast 
started to sing "Up, Up with Patriots". 
The finale song was finished and the 
curtain fell. Another Patriot on Parade 
show had come to an end. More than 
1200 had seen the Thursday, Saturday 
shows. 



great enthusiasm. Michael the 



WHILE twirling her 
Mondays" for Patri 



parasol, Junior Lisa Reed sings "Rainy Days and 
ots on Parade. 




POP/43 



Is love 

contagious? 

asks cast 



lor weeks all that was heard 
echoing through the empty space of the 
auditorium was, "Get those lines down, 
or else!" and "I want to get out of here 
at a decent hour." The voice of Jerry 
Hurst, the director, bellowed at them 
night after night. 

Finally on November 17, there was no 
more yelling. Our nerves were like jello 
as the stage manager gave the word. 
"Love is Contagious" was underway! 

The play opened in the tiny Greenwich 



Village apartment of Sam Harway and 
Robbie Winters on a night when Sam 
planned to propose to a chorus girl 
named Kitty Guage. Unexpectedly Rob- 
bie's sister, Sally, arrives from Kansas. 
When Kitty arrives, she spots Sally at 
the bedroom door and storms out in 
fury leaving Sam with a lobster, some 
champagne and Sally. 

In the next scene, Robbie and his 
fiancee Diane Roberts argue over the 
career of Diane and the perfect wife 
Robbie wants. When no compromise is 
found, Diane gives Robbie his ring back 
and storms out. In this scene a gambler 
named Harry Turner comes to stay in 
the apartment with Sam, Robbie and 
Sally. While staying at the apartment 
Sam meets a young girl named Georgia 




SAM, played by Warren Smith, tries desperately to persuade Sally, played by Laura 
Spires to leave before his dinner date arrives. 

ASSISTANT director Bonnie Stark patiently follows the script as the actors rehearse 
their lines. She was a big help to director Jerry Hurst. 



Rutherford who reforms him from a 
drinking gambler to a self-respecting 
deli-operator. 

In the third and final scene it's Sally's 
birthday party. Cupid's arrows strike 
Robbie, Diane, Harry, and Georgia as 
both couples announce plans to marry. 
Unsuspecting that Sam had fallen out 
of love with Kitty and in love with her, 
Sally sets up a meeting between Sam 
and Kitty. Ofice again tempers fly and 
Sam is left standing red in the face 
from a slap from Kitty. But all ends 
well, the scene ends as Sam and Sally 
make their wedding plans. Yes, Love 
was Contagious! 

— Rick Smith and 
Martha Wright 




TRYING to decide what outfit to wear for the play is rather diffi- 
cult as Darla Forbis knows. But really! Tennis shoes and a dress! 



44/ Play 







SAM (Warren Smith) cringes painfully as Kitty (Shan- 
non Bryant) smacks him boldly across the face at dis- 
covering Sally in his apartment. 

HARRY (Chip Jacobs) lays drunkenly on the floor after 
stumbling in from one of his unfortunate mishaps. 

SAM (Warren Smith) energetically prepares for his din- 
ner date with Kitty, the girl he plans to become engaged 
to. 




CAST OF CHARACTERS 




Sally Winters 


Laura Spires 


Sam Harway 


Warren Smith 


Robbie Winters 


Bob Wray 


Diane Roberts 


Carla Adams 


Mrs Kayser 


Lisa Mansfield 


Miss Lerner 


Linda Martins 


Guy Ketchen 


Mike Dye 


Harry Turner 


Chip Jacobs 


Mimi Lamarr 


Dotty Vincel 


Georla Rutherford 


Darla Forbis 


Kitty Guage 


Shannon Bryant 



Play/45 



Four languages gives students big choice 
M 



arshall's students have always 
been blessed with a wide variety of 
courses from which to choose, and this 
is particularly true of the Foreign Lan- 
guage Department. Students have tra- 
ditionally been offered four languages: 
French, German, Latin, or Spanish. 
Each of these languages have instruc- 
tors who will stop at nothing to make 
their class the most interesting it can 
possibly be. No longer do students learn 
only the basic vocabulary and grammar 
of the language but they also learn 
about the culture, history, geography 
and customs of the country in question. 
What's more, these teachers are contin- 
ually organizing and carrying out extra- 
curricular activities. 

The dedication to their languages 
have paid off, in the minds of many 
teachers, in the caliber of students en- 
rolled in foreign languages that is con- 
stantly going up. The interest general- 
ized by its department is enviable when 
one language, with the exception of 
Latin, have two classes at four year or 
higher this demonstrates that students 
take languages not because they are re- 
quired for entrance to many colleges, 
but because the students actually enjoy 
these classes. Still another gauge to 
judge the ability of students enroll in 
foreign language is the fact that hardly 
a summer goes by when one of the stu- 
dents is not studying abroad to do some 
sort of foreign language grant. Regret- 
tably this past summer was one of the 
few that none did go over seas; how- 
ever, Tamara Crawley, A German stu- 
dent was first runner up in a contest 
that would have sent her abroad. By 
anyone's standards, however, the for- 
eign language department is one of the 
most dedicated and interesting depart- 
ments at Marshall. 

— Mark Sausser 




GRAMMAR is a very important part of foreign 
languages. These students study verb bases in 
Latin I. 



SPANISH is not always exciting. These students 
find the lesson a little dull. 




46/ Foreign Language 







I 

X 




\ 



* 



"*«.• 








KIM Couse picks up a few pointers from a tape 
when her Spanish class visits the Lab. 

PRONOUNCIATION is the key to learning a for- 
eign language. 



FOREIGN Language Department: top row: David 
Clapp, Brice Tressler, Janice Hoft. Bottom Row: 
Marvoleen Nicholson, Ruth Nelson, department 
head; Helen Bailey. 




Foreign Language/47 



Espano 
Deutsch 
Francais 
Latina 



our of the more active clubs be- 
longed to the foreign language depart- 
ment—the German, Spanish, Latin and 
French clubs. 

The German Club consisted of ap- 
proximately 80 students, and their 
sponsor was Brice Tressler. A few of 
their activities were hosting a Barvarian 
dance group, going on trips such as to 
Frankenmuth and having a picnic and 
pizza party. 

The Spanish Club, sponsored by Mar- 
volene Nicholson, is one of the largest in 
the state. Their activities included mak- 
ing pinatas for a Christmas party, hav- 



ing a Taco party, making paper flowers, 
and even having a float for the Home- 
coming display. 

The French club, sponsored by Jan 
Hoffts, the French teacher, and the 
Latin club, sponsored by Helen Bailey 
were the other clubs. 

An activity that was entertaining for 
the school was the Latin Club's dress- 
up day. They dressed like ancient Ro- 
mans, andihey even had a slave trade. 

But the most fun for all the clubs was 
the Softball challenge in May and June 
when the Spanish Club had to defend 
its championship. Faculty umpires and 
coaches added to the fun. 




ED Miller's band helped to liven up the festivities at the Cafe Heidelberg when the German Club went to 
the Octoberfest at Castleton Square. 



SHELLY Hamilton, Sheila Malone and Marcia Walls 
participated in the Latin Club's dress-up day by 
dressing up as ancient Latins. 



THE Spanish Club constructed many pinatas to help celebrate the Christmas season at their Christmas party this year. 




48/ Language clubs 




DAVID Clapp forgets his Spanish for a day and helps out 
with the Latin Dress-up day. His resemblance to an an- 
cient Latin was remarkable. 



THE German Club has many active members including Jackie Pease, Secretary; Linda Litsey, Vice- 
President; Cindy Bales, President; Edith Speights, 'Cookie Woman' and Mary Kay Turner, Public 
Relations. 



AT the Octoberfest, the German Club had a wide variety of German foods to choose from in case 
they had hunger pains during the many festivities. 





Language clubs/49 



Assistants help department workload 

M 



larshall has many messengers 
and assistants who have given up their 
study halls, lunch hours and before and 
after school time to help out with the 
work loads of each department. 

The students do all types of work, 
take call slips, run errands, file, type, 
grade papers, and assist in helping get 
the work done. 

"I like it and do it because it gives me 
experience in office work", commented 
sophomore Denise Owings who was a 
messenger for Mr. Austin. 

Many of the teachers found their as- 
sistants very helpful. "Top people; that 
have the highest integrity and are aca- 
demically strong. People of high charac- 
ter. They can carry out assignments 
without being intimidated. They can talk 
with parents with friendship and recog- 
nize they are representing Mr. McCool 
and John Marshall when talking to 
them. I feel that without the help of my 
loyal messengers my attendance 
records would be impossible," says the 
assistant dean, Mr. George McCool. 

Mrs. Christy finds it very difficult to 
carry the heavy work loads in her office 
without the help. 

Some students work as science and 
math assistants and while helping 
teachers, they can also be helping 
themselves by learning more and gain- 
ing more experience. 

Many of the nurse's assistants feel it 
gives them an opportunity to observe 
the works of a nurse first hand. The 
school nurse, Mrs. Francis, thinks her 
assistants are great and really appreci- 
ates and enjoys their help as assistants 
and as people. 

Without these assistants much work 
would be left undone. 




SENIOR Martha Wright helps Ben Sanders on 
Student Council results as part of her assistant 
duties. 



NURSES assistants: Glenda Gray, Nurse Martha 
Francis, Cindy Martin, David Miller, Kris Royce, 
David Wright, Jamie Simmons and Rhonda Feller. 




50/Guidance 




LORI Kaufman, an assistant for Don Austin, looks ONE of the biggest jobs at Marshall is the job of BOYS dean, Marion Burlerson, talks with a parent 

at the file of student's records to make sure no John Vardaman's secretary, Mrs. Collier. about his son. 

mistakes were made. 







Guidance/51 



Cook coaches 
Cross Country 



he 1977 season held several 
disappointments for this year's cross 
country squad. After finishing 7-7 last 
season, big things were expected. How- 
ever, a 6-7 record and a disappointing 
9th in the city meet left the team mem- 
bers unsatisfied. The talent was there, 
but all the runners could not put to- 
gether an outstanding performance in 
any one meet. Four runners went under 
14:00 for the grueling 2 Va mile run, a 
very respectable time; however, only 
two went under 14:00 in any one meet. 
At times the team actually did better in 
practice than they did during the meets. 
An unpleasant suprising loss to North 
Central at the sectionals finished the 
season. Matt Mulcahy was the number 
one runner for most of the season with 
Don Inman running with him until he 
was sidelined with an injury in mid-sea- 
son. Injury also robbed the team of 
John Kuhn and a pre-season hopeful, 
Tom Carson. For several meets during 
the season Greg Arnold and Mo Miller 
were other stand-out runners, with 
times in the low 14's all season long. All 
these runners are juniors and will re- 
turn next year along with sophomore Ed 
Kett to make a very tough team. Team 
member senior and team captain Mark 
Sausser and Head Coach Gregg Cook 
will not be returning next year. Both 
these people have contributed quite a 
bit to the morale and leadership of the 
squad and will be missed. 





52/Cross Country 




CROSS Country Team— Bottom Row: Mark Sausser, Greg Arnold, Curt McDowell, Don Inman, Mathew MARSHALL runners participated in the City 
Mulcahy, Tom Carson. Top Row: Ed Kett, Paul Rifner, Mo Miller, Brian Glotfelty, Scott Justice, John Tourney at Tech but couldn't come up with any 
Kuhn. decisive victories. 




Cross Country/53 



Netter's surpass 
expectations 

he 1977 Girls' Volleyball Team 
had a difficult season with their sched- 
ule being tougher than in the past. The 
Varsity team ended up with a 11-9 
record, while the JV team had a spec- 
tacular 15-3 record. A freshman team 
was added to the program but being 
new and having a first year, Coach 
Brenda Dyke did not have a successful 
season. 

Inexperience was the key to varsity 
difficulties, having only one returning 
letterman, Susie Napper. Although Nap- 
per's spikes contributed to the team, it 
was not enough to keep the team's mo- 
mentum up. Other spiking thrillers were 
Senior Elaine Pate, Senior Trish Mont- 
gomery, Junior Pennie Christensen, and 
Sophomore Toni Stroh. Serving was a 
key to Marshall's victories with out- 
standing serving from Elaine Pate, Trish 
Montgomery, Pennie Christensen and 
Karen Wever. Setting was also a major 
factor because these people had to get 
the ball to the spikers, which was one of 
Marshall's weaknesses. Setters were 
Senior Diane Casey, Senior Karen We- 
ver and Junior Linda Curry. Coach 
Shirley Lambert commented, "I've en- 




SERVING the ball during afternoon practice is Senior Patricia Montgomery. 




COACH Shirley Lambert observes the varsity during scrimmage. The hours of practice pay off later during the season. 



54/Volleyball 




joyed the season and expect an ex- 
cellent season next year." 

Junior Varsity play was better than 
expected. City Tourney Champs was the 
highlight for this team as they were the 
first JV city champs ever. There were 
many close matches throughout the 
season, but the Patriots were able to 
pull through. Serving was one of JV 
stronger points with Sophomore Lori 
McFarland and Junior Sheryl Graves 
doing an excellent job for the season. 
Spikers were Junior Becky Napper, Ju- 
nior Mona Cox and Sophomore Kerry 
Hallem. 

"Spiking is expected from Junior Lisa 
Browne who should be one of the best 
in the city," comments Lambert. An- 
other major factor that contributed to 
the team's success was the outstanding 
setting ability from sophomores Kathy 
Wever, Dawn Forbis and Beth Lutocka. 
"This team should do very well next 
year if they play up to their skills and 
capabilities," states Coach Lambert. 

VARSITY-Front Row: Toni Stroh, Penny Chris- 
tensen, Elaine Pate Back Row: Diane Casey, Linda 
Curry, Patricia Montgomery, Karen Wever, Sussie 
Napper 

FRESHMEN-Front Row: Paula Rulmkorff, Lori 
Reever, Terry Johnson Back Row: Sheila Rudicell, 
Jeanie Kuhn, Tammy Reed, Sharon Johnson, 
Kerry Finegold, Linda Raimer 

J. V.— Front Row: Becky Napper, Lisa Browne, 
Kerry Hallam Back Row: Mona Cox, Lori 
McFarland, Kathy Weaver, Cheryl Graves, Beth 
Lutocka, Dawn Forbis 



Volleyball/55 



M 



Pool-less Pats split season 



larshall's swimming program, 
in its second year, has improved greatly. 
Head coach John Deal commented on 
the team's 5-5 record by saying that 
the team has improved to be successful 
after only two years of competition. This 
year's team was made up of 12 stu- 
dents, all of whom will be returning 
next year with the exception of senior 
Mike Williams. 

Those returning next year are David 
Browning, Dennis Browning, John Ger- 
ber, Denny Hallam, Don Inman, Ed 
Kett, Jeff Opel, Tony Petrucianni, Dave 
Rowley, Ricky Vanatta and Larry Willan. 



The girls also improved this year by 
bettering their record to 4-7 because 
the team recruited eight freshmen. 
Head coach Jan Reel stated that the 
girls were more experienced this year, 
and the team's larger size helped out in 
the victory column. 

The entire team will be returning next 
year. They are Kim Blaydoe, Kellie 
Cline, Shari Fulton, Lisa Gill, Liane 
Holder, Debbie Lowe, Missy Miller, 
Nedy Rives, Lynne Riley, Shelly Rose- 
nstihl, Kelly Stoe, Marty Stoe, and 
Kathy Zech. 




56/Swimming 





CH John Deal 



BOYS Swim Team— Top Row; Coach John Deal, 
Rick Vanatta, Denny Hallam, Dave Rowley, Larry 
Willan, Dave Browning, Don Inman Front Row: 
Mike Williams, Jeff Opel, John Gerber, Ed Kett, 
Tony Petrucianni, Dennis Browning 

GIRLS Swim Team— Top Row: Lisa Gill, Rene Dis- 
ser, Kellie Cline, Coach Jan Reel Middle Row: 
Lynne Riley, Kathy Zech, Kim Blaydoe, Debbie 
Lowe, Sheri Fulton, Kelly Stoe, Sally Duncan, 
Marty Stoe Bottom Row: Liane Holder, Neta 
Rives, Debbie Arnold, Shelly Rosenstihl 



Swimming/57 



Pats share 
in City Title 



^^howing signs of being a possible 
football power in the near future, the 
varsity team improved on their previous 
2-8 season with a solid 7-3 tally for the 
'78 season, the best in JMHS history. 

The season started with a promising 
win in the Jamboree. The varsity team 
then took two straight wins over Sce- 
cina and Tech before going a forfeit 
against Howe because of the use of an 
ineligible man on the Howe team. The 
varsity squad then rolled over Wood, 
51-6. The next game was a disappoint- 
ment to all patriot fans who were look- 
ing for our first victory against a Law- 
rence Central football team in seven 
years. 

Arlington posed no problem for the 
Patriot machine as the defense held the 
Golden Knights scoreless for the only 
shutout of the year. Homecoming was 
another story, the game ended Chatard 
28, Marshall 0. "The slump was caused 
by the players participating in the 
Homecoming game activities, "said 
Head Coach Bopp. Bopp, who is starting 
his second year at Marshall took over a 
poor football program and has turned it 
around in the span of only two years, 
generating new fan interest and spirit. 

The team repaid the fans for their 
faithfulness by posting their two best 
victories against competition which was 
ranked in the top twenty, Washington 
and Roncalli to reach their city record 
of 7-1 and to become Co-City 
Champions. 

The team will be hurt mostly by the 
loss of offensive and defensive linemen, 
but replacements should be found in 
the J.V. and Freshmen ranks. The J.V. 
team finished with a fine record of 6-3 
while the Freshmen became the only 
undefeated Marshall football team ever. 
They won the city championship while 
holding opponents to a record low, 14 
points for the entire season. 

With the talented freshmen and j.v. 
players moving up to varsity level, the 
record of 7-3 might seem like a losing 
season. 

— Brian Fanning and 
Scott Worpell 



58/ Football 








TOM Henry, senior running back, is being at- 
tended to by a physician who is taping his ankles. 
Henry gained 453 yards on 88 attempts for a 5.1 
yard average for the season. 

JOY, jubilation and ecstasy are just a few of the 
emotions that these Varsity players are ex- 
periencing after scoring another Patriot 
touchdown. 

COACH Tom Marendt, uttering words of dis- 
pleasure, is contemplating the fortunes and mis- 
fortunes of the football team. 



Football/59 




GETTING tackled is all part of the game as this offensive 
player finds out. 



60/ Football 




RUNNING around end is sophomore back Keith Jones. Keith gained 712 
yards for the season. 

DISCUSSING game plans is Head Coach Bopp and Coach Marendt with 
Jerry Hawkins. 










FIRST Row: G. Holman, L Norris, D. Crouch, D. Owens, S. Moore, A. Dillon. 
K. Pompey, B. Bultman, S. Carder, A. Blackwell, E. Robinson, J. McCoy, J. 
Cross, R. Dorsey, R. Henry, D. Shluge. Second Row: B. Ervin, P. Houston, R. 
Newell, C. Rudicell, M. Sutten, R. Wilson, M. Jaresinske, J. Hawkins, D. 
Shinkle, D. Willians, M. Shannon, K. Jones, D. Lessley, R. Shephard, G. Agee, 



R. Hartman, M. Pollard. Third Row: R. Welch, B. McCrackin, A. Pare, M. 
Jarosinske, D. Jordon, M. Riddick, J. Bowlby, J. Davis, W. Bradford, J. Fish, 
J. White, M. Schlimgen, J. Burnell, S. Moore, S. Williams, W. Gillard, B. Fill- 
enwarth, J. Hightshoe, K. Irvine, P. Hammond, W. Clark, T. Daughtery, M. 
Ferree. 



FRESHMEN-First Row: M. Brickens, J. Brown, W. Yarbrough, T. Murphy, D. 
Lewis, B. Jennings, A. Jackson, T. Allen, J. Nelson, T. Washington, A. Allen. 
Second Row: J. Deeny, D. Members, M. Kendricks, J. Fisher, L. Leech, C. Phil- 
lips, E. Philps, C. Lacy, C. Benberry, J. Dorsey, W. Wolf, A. Alexander, M. Bi- 



gham. Third Row: J. Adaway, S. Blanche, F. Holcomb, C. Agee, L. Jacobs, J. 
McCall, D. Hubbard, F. Flesor, T. Hupp, L. Haskins, B. Prebst, C. Harder. 
Fourth Row: Coach D. Smith, J. Dorsey, P. Stroh, K. Weeds, Hopkins, Coach 
L. Bivens, Coach L. Brinkens. 



% jt/a^tti 



* ,m- s*. 






fflpr 




Pats lose in 
semi-state 



I he 1977-78 soccer team was a 
little upset after falling to the Heritage 
Christians 2-1 in the semi-state play- 
offs. The undefeated patriots over-ran 
Indianapolis Baptist 5-1 in the Region- 
al and advanced to the Semi-State. 
Anything less than winning was a let- 
down from last year's Indiana Mid- 
State Championship team. 

The patriots expect to have a good 
season next year with Junior Ricky 
Hartman as acting coach and key 
player. Returning players to the team 
are seniors Jim Hammond, Archie Root, 
Ken Novotny, Randy Swineford, Pat Ce- 
cil and Randy Fischer; juniors Ricky 
Hartman, Ed Wedder, Mike Arnold and 
Chris Sheldon. 

The team, with as many inexperi- 
enced as experienced players, said, 
"We'll try to pass all the old records 
and set our own." 

THE soccer team showed their enthusiasm and 
determination by putting in many after school 
hours of practice which rewarded them with a 
chance to participate in the semi-state play-offs. 

GRADUATE Kenny Williams shows that his talent 
is above that of his opponents and has half of the 
team following in his tracks. 

SOCCER team-Top Row: Archie Root, Danny 
Lessley, Ken Novotny, Randy Swineford, Mike Ar- 
nold, coach Mike Hicks. Bottom Row: Randy Fi- 
scher, Sputz Leakeas, Clifford Hartman, Steve 
Profeit, Jimmy Hammond, Gary Fischer, Norman 
Gwaltney. 




iH I 



16 




62/Soccer 







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63 




GETTING your thoughts together is a major part 
of writing themes. This student has completed 
this and has started to actually put it down on 
paper. 



English Dept. 

still largest 

at Marshall 



he phase elective program in 
English has always been popular, and this 
year was no exception with the addition 
of several new courses including World 
Literature. The students at Marshall have 
always appreciated having the chance to 
choose what will be the major emphasis 
in the classes they take. Administrators 
feared that if students were allowed to 
make their own decision regarding 
courses, they would consistently take 
easy courses. This was proven wrong by 
the fact that Etymology, the study of 
words and their derivatives, was the most 
popular class this year. Students such as 



Susan Engelking and Maggi Mogollon 
took the course because V T know that 
there will be a lot of vocabulary on the 
SAT." 

Many students took two or three 
English courses, which helped to make it 
the largest department in the school. Dr. 
James Gaither heads the 18-teacher 
department. 

The CAT helped students realize what 
their English weaknesses were. Teachers 
and students worked together to help im- 
prove mastery of English. 

— Marcia Ahlefeld 
Martha Wright 
Mark Sausser 






64/ English 




MANY skills are taught in English 3. Here Karen SHERRI 

Ginger learns to read upside down. Actually she's to write 
checking a theme. 



Roberts thinks about how she will be able 
a theme in one night. 



TOP row: Dept. head Dr. James Gaither, Robert 
Weaver, Nancy Williams, Linda Breyer, Lynn 
Palenik, Jane Zerbo, Beverly Wilkins, Linda 
James, Jack Davis, Jerry Hurst. Bottom row: 
Pearla Gholston, Rochelle Owsley, June Grundy, 
Colleen Stanley, Joan McDowell, Faith Alford, 
Jan Eberle. 




English/65 



Marshall— only school teaching botany 



| T | arshall has always been famous 
city-wide for its science department. 
Besides the courses, such as Botany 
and Anatomy, which no other city high 
school offers, Marshall has a higher 
percentage of students taking two or 
more years of science than any other 
school. What makes Patriots so inter- 
ested in this field? It's a combination of 
things. First of all, the class variety 
ranges from Earth Science to Physics. 
Physical and Earth Science are offered 
to freshmen which means many stu- 
dents have already had a year of 
science before taking Biology which is 
required of all sophomores. After Biol- 
ogy, the choices are so great that no 
one could take all the courses offered. 
These classes include two types of 
chemistry, Botany, Horiculture and two 
types of Physics. 

Another reason for science's success 
is the fact that progressive methods are 
used. Nearly every class has at least one 
field trip during the year. Besides these 
trips, work in the field and in the lab is 
important. 

SHERRI Roberts studies the spliting of cells in 
sophomore Biology. Students were required to 
memorize the steps. 




PEGGY LaCroix studies her Physics book up close. 
That she is working hard can be told by the large 
stack of books on her desk. 



THESE sophomores are hard at work on their lab 
assignment in biology. A great deal of lab work is 
required in this class. 










66/Science 




FIELDWORK was an important part of one's 
grade in biology. Here a student collects leaves, a 
popular part of the course. 



LEE Ann Morris and Scott Holden work with their 
lab partners on gumdrop molecules in sophomore 
Biology. 



SHOCKED by his Chemistry grade or else by his 
experiment, Junior John Kuhn's hair stands on 
end at the Children's Museum. 




^**>J!^ 




History Dept. Try s New Teaching Method 



'ften a department at Marshall 
was judged only so far as the required 
courses were concerned. In the case of 
the Social Studies Department, these 
required courses were U.S. History, 
Government, Economics. A majority of 
the students tended to regard the en- 
tire department as dull on the basis of 
these required courses. But these 
classes represented only a few of the 
many class offerings. World Civilization 
and Indiana History were two of the 
elective courses; but students were not 
restricted to history classes. Psychology, 
Urban Problems and Criminal Law were 
a few of the diversified offerings 
available. 

A highlight of the Government classes 
was the annual convention in which the 
students discovered first hand how can- 
didates are chosen in a national conven- 
tion. In Psychology, students were re- 
quired to work puzzles in order to 
determine one's insight and to drive one 
mad. 

As in all departments, Dwight Shaw, 
Department Head realizes that students 
did not learn well in a class that con- 
sisted of nothing but lectures and recit- 
als. Because of this, worksheets began 
to take a back seat to more progressive 
teaching. Reports and term papers were 
required by some of the teachers. 

THE mock election was a hightlight of the senior 
government classes. Here students display state 
signs while listening to their keynote speaker, Da- 
vid Owens. 

FIRST Row: Shelia Smith, Julie Brown, Priscilla 
Perkins, Carole Terry, Sandra Keith, Brian Hall, 
Paul Winship, David Jordan. Second Row: Linda 
Arington, Judy Brezauski, Sheri Leslie, Jean 
Terry, Jay Price, Renee Lacy, James Fairly, 
Thersa Washington. Middle Row: Dora Hall, 
Louisa Icard, Pam Lloyd, Priscilla Erickson. Third 
Row: Carrie Finegold, Lawana Welch, Wes Gainey, 
Glenna Bowers, Robert Welch, Julie Yaring, Mike 
Molanga, Jeff Hendricks. Fourth Row: Loren Volz, 
Ester Ruble, Lori Aurrlla, Carrie Torros, Kim Fur- 
bee, Cheryl Lee, Lina Moore, Julie Mittman. 







68/Social Studies 





MR. John Deal instructs his class on the finer 
points of U.S. History. 

TOP Row: Dan Bullington, John Eason, Les Bi- 
vens, Dave Harvey, Debbie Smith, Brad Eshelman, 
John Allen. Bottom Row: Joyce Sausser, Ralph 
Scott, Dave Lampert, Irvin Graves, Dept. Head 
Dwight Shaw, John Deal. 



Social Studies/69 



■i*" 












KEVIN McPherson and Jackie Pease give their many points to their 
debate. 



ELIZABETH Bell and Butch McCrackin compete in a Dramatic Duo, one of the many 
types of events of the speech team. 




Speech team not recognized as should 



M 



lany students of John Marshall 
were not familiar with the speech team, 
led by Linda Breyer. The reason for the 
lack of prominence was that the Speech 
Team usually did not compete at 
Marshall. 

The speech team consisted of 12 
members. The officers were President 
Ladora Butler, Vice President Jackie 
Pease, and Secretary-Treasurer Butch 
McCrackin. The team met a few times 
at the beginning of the semester, to get 
acquainted, but throughout the rest of 



the year Breyer met individually with 
each member. 

Questions were raised as to exactly 
what the speech team did at contests. 
There were eight major events. Three of 
these were poetry reading, radio an- 
nouncing and original speech writing. 
Impromtu reading was another type of 
contest in which students were given a 
topic to speak about. Two other types of 
contests were dramatic and dramatic 
duo interpretation. In this event one or 



more students read the dialogue of a 
play. 

The speech team met and competed 
at different high schools. Three of the 
major contests of the year were at 
Lawrence Central, Arsenal Tech, and 
Chrysler High Schools, with Ladora But- 
ler winning a few of these events. 

Two other important competitions 
were the Voice of Democracy and the 
Rotary. Michael Cheatam won honors 
for JTV1HS at both of these events. 






70/Speech 



Actors join 
Thespians 



I he International Thespian So- 
ciety here at JMHS was sponsored by 
Jerry Hurst and Paul Justice. Thespians 
is an honorary society composed of stu- 
dents of drama who've collected a cer- 
tain number of points. Points were col- 
lected by working behind the sets of a 
play, working on make-up, costumes or 
performing on stage itself. 





Thespians/71 




JUNIOR Julie Bush 
drives around two op- 
ponents for an easy 
lay-up. 



SOPHOMORE Kim Mastin prepares to go up for 
two points. 



SOPHOMORE Christy Deer looks for an opening 
while under pressure from an opposing player. 



FRESHMAN Wendy Wallace easily out-jumps her 
opponent for the ball. 



72/Girls' Basketball 




New coach 
building year 



Ihe 1977-78 girls' basketball 
season can be summed up best as a 
learning season for both the players and 
first year coach Brenda Dyke. Time was 
the key factor for the team in order for 
both the players and the coach to be- 
come better oriented with one another. 
The girl cagers started the season off 
with bad luck in their second contest 
against Shortridge where two key play- 
ers, senior Rita Taylor and freshman 
Cassandra Brown, were seriously in- 
jured. Both of these players could have 
been starters on any given night and 
their ability was missed considerably 
throughout the season. 




Despite the 3-12 record, the girls 
never gave up. Each player consistently 
put their best effort forward and always 
played a hard running game until the fi- 
nal buzzer. 

The team played well in many games 
that they lost where lack of height and 
experience were two key factors that 
were missed to pull the team through to 
the winning column. 

Senior Susie Napper was a standout 
player throughout the season. Her best 
game and the team's first win was 
against Broad Ripple, where Napper 
scored a career high of 32 points and 
hauled down 27 rebounds. Because of 
this fine achievement and many others, 
Napper had gained respect from both 
coaches and players throughout the 
city. The three-year lettermen will be 
greatly missed next season. 

Other top scorers during the season 
include freshman Monique Carter, 
sophomore Lori McFarland, and juniors 
Pennie Christensen and Julie Bush. Re- 
bounding honors go to senior Susie 
Napper, junior Missy Opel, and also Car- 
ter and Christensen, respectively. 

Comments coach Dyke, "I really en- 
joyed this team. They always kept in 
good spirits no matter how badly they 
were getting beat. Next year we will be 
ready to play and surprise a lot of 
teams." 

Graduating players include Susie 
Napper, Joan Kane, Diana Casey and 
Rita Taylor. 

—Julie Bush 

JV-Top: Beth Lutocka, Christy Deer, Kim Mastin, 
Wendy Wallace, Paula Ruhmkorff, Mary Devore, 
Joni Kuhn Bottom Row: Charletta Morris, Traci 
Whiles, Coach Charlene Vinton 

VARSITY-Top Row: Missy Opel, Julie Bush, Mo- 
nique Carter, Penny Christensen, Sussie Napper, 
Lori McFarland, Joan Kane, Diane Casey Bottom 
Row: Coach Brenda Dyke, Linda Curry 



Girls' Basketball/73 



IMC not just for work 



H veryday many Marshall students 
depend on the IMC to provide them 
with the books, magazines and other 
materials needed to complete their as- 
signments. Indeed this is the main pur- 
pose of the library's 18,000 books and 
multitude of other materials ranging 
from magazines to cassettes. The two 
full-time librarians make the IMC one 
of the best staffed libraries in the city. 
Although these librarians have many 
duties, their primary job is to help stu- 
dents to find the materials they need. 
Most students have traditionally re- 
garded the library as a last resort when 
they can put off that paper no longer. 
Virginia McDonald, head librarian, feels 
that students should also use the mate- 
rials in the library for personal use as 
well as school work. Aside from film- 
strips during study hall, not many stu- 
dents think of the library on this level. 

MRS. Jane Farber, speech and hearing therapist, 
seen here busy at work. 

JUNIOR Counselor Ben Sanders speaks with Bar- 
bara Dyke, data processing clerk. 




IMC Staff: Jerry Hurst, Becky Hertz, Librarian 
Virginia McDonald, Fran Jacobs, Connie Rushton, 
Judy Fee 




:*'*"' IJlUr " 



1*0 %r 




74/IMC-0ffice 




BEVERLY Wilkins, special education teacher, re- 
ceives instruction from James Rodeheffer. 



ANGELA White works on a bulletin board as a li- 
brary student assistant. 



LEE Campbell writes the days' memos for princi- 
pal Thomas Haynes. 



IMC-0ffice/75 




7fe/Cheerleaders 







MAKING a pyramid are Varsity Cheerleaders Deb- 
bie Fontana, Elaine Houck, Dennis Johnson, 
LeAnn Miller, Tina White, Shelia Malone, Scott 
Carder and Bob Jackson. 



FRESHMEN Cheerleaders: Cris White, Rita Jorosinski, Verina Nevills, Maria Torres and Julie VonBurg. 





Cheerleaders led Pat spirit 



■■ 



M 



-A-R-S-H-A-L-L MAR- 
SHALL!" yells the JMHS crowd as they 
follow the directions of the 
cheerleaders. 

The JMHS cheerleaders, sponsored 
by Martha Griffin, cheered at all the 
JMHS football and basketball games in 
the season of '77 and '78. 

The varsity cheerleaders were Debbie 
Fontana, Elaine Houck, Sheila Malone, 
LeeAnn Miller, Dorcas White, Tina 
White and Vickie Williams, Boy cheer- 
leaders, who were added during the 



basketball season, were Dan Schulge, 
Steve Shepard, Dennis Johnson, Scott 
Carder, Greg Agee, Ricky Hartman and 
Bob Jackson. 

JV cheerleaders and freshman cheer- 
leaders led the cheers at all junior var- 
sity and freshman football and basket- 
ball games respectively as well as 
appeared at the Varsity games to help 
the varsity cheer. JV cheerleaders were 
Shelly Haskett, Tonya Hudson, Dianne 
Swineford, Kandi Stewart and Monique 
Waters. Freshmen were Julie VonBurg, 
Marie Torres, Chris White, Rita Jaro- 
sinski and Verina Nevills. 



Cheerleaders/77 



Varsity City 
Runners-Up 



he 1977-78 basketball season 
turned out to be a real heartbreaker for 
all patriot fans. 

Picked to be repeat sectional winner, 
the varsity squad dropped their opening 
contest to Scecina. Scecina went on to 
win the sectional title. 

Marshall did, however, have a fine 
showing in the city tournament, knock- 
ing off highly regarded Tech before suc- 
cumbing to the Washington Continen- 
tals in the championship game at 
Hinkle. Leaving the city-runnerup squad 
this year are all-state forward and col- 
lege prospect David Wright, all-sectional 
Kevin Jones, James Jenkins, Steve 
Thomas, Doug Reed, Greg Holman, 
Marcus Dunlop and Andre Edmonson. 

The nucleus of next year's squad will 
be juniors Jamie Fish, Michael Johnson 
and Danny Lessley. 

Coach Roger Schroder commented on 
his 15-8 Patriots, "there were many 
things that we could have done in the 
tournament, but, posting a 15-8 record 
along with city-runnerup is a nice little 
accomplishment." 

A. Poncho Wright, this year's leading scorer and 
rebounder, will be missed by the varsity squad. 

B. Senior Doug Reed looks for an opening in the 
opposing team's defense. 

C. Senior Greg Holman pops for two from 15 feet. 

D. Varsity— Front Row: Coach Lestonovich Bivens, 
Tracy Black, Tony Dark, Duane Doles, Louis Nor- 
ris, Coach Rodger Schroder. Back Row: Jamie 
Fish, Kevin Jones, Doug Reed, Greg Holman, 
Marcus Dunlop, Michael Johnson, Poncho Wright, 
James Jenkins, Steve Thomas, Donny Lessley, 
Andre Edmonson. 

E. Senior Kevin Jones gets ready to make a base- 
line charge towards the hoop. 

F. Hinkle fieldhouse and pregame activities. 
Hinkle was the site for Marshall's second-place 
finish in the city. 




78/ Basketball 




Basketball/79 



«.- 




M 



80/ Basketball 





J. V. — Front Row: Coach 
Lester Bivens, Tracy 
Black, Tony Light, Duanne 
Doles, Louis Norris. Back 
Row: Marvin Snow, Tom 
Medford, Kenneth Smith, 
Scott Holden, Jim Hous- 
ton, Scott, Carrol, Juan 
Jackson, Randall Burch, 
Doyle Brooks, Efrom Ed- 
monson, London McBride, 
Roberts Davids, Greg Da- 
Ion, Danny Stephens. 



FRESHMAN-Clockwise: 
Thomas, Jones, J.V., 
Freshmen, Holman, Jen- 
kins, City, Wright. Front 
Row: John Jenkins, Paul 
Nowlin, Houston Mills, 
William Yarborough, An- 
thony Allen, Courtney Gor- 
don, Curtis Appleton. Back 
Row: Coach Irving Graves, 
Harold Anderson, Leroy 
Leach, Andre Hatchett, 
Billy Ellison, Richard Rob- 
inson, Chris Withers, Mi- 
chael Kendrick, Jerome 
Myricks. 



Basketball/81 



M 



Henry City Champ 



1 arshall's wrestling Patriots fin- 
ished the season with a record of 3-7-1, 
which was a disappointment to the 
wrestlers and coaches considering they 
showed much promise for this year. 

Consistent wrestlers for Marshall 
were seniors Steve Shepard— 145, 
Charles Jenkins— 155, Tom Henry— 177 
and Junior David Williams, Hwt. 

Williams, who figures to be one of the 
best heavyweights in the state next 
year, earned a berth to the semi-state 
meet, but, forfeited because of illness. 

Henry, who won the city champion- 
ship by decisioning Charles Blanchard of 
Tech 12-7 in the finals, placed third in 
the regionals. 

Highlights of the season included 
Shepard losing an extremely exciting 
match by two points in overtime to Jeff 
Wilson of Warren in the semi-final 



round of the Sectionals and Williams 
decisioning the city champ and pinning 
the city runner-up in the same day. 
Jenkins outclassed his Cathedral oppo- 
nent 24-2 and Henry came from behind 
to decision Blanchard 5-4 in a dual 
meet at Tech. 

Other varsity wrestlers were Steve 
Shriver— 98, Jeff Shriver— 105, Kevin 
King-112, Jim McCall-119, Pete Gu- 
tierrez— 126, John Kuhn— 132, Mark 
Jarsinski— 138, and Ray Shepard— 167. 

In reserve wrestling Nick Tuttle, last 
year's freshman champ at 105, won at 
126 to prime him for next year's varsity 
team while Michael Shannon Jr., lost 
his only match of the year in the city-fi- 
nals to Scecina. 

In freshman action Mark Soots fin- 
ished second in the city after losing in 
the finals. 




Steve Shepard 




82/Wrestling 



m '^^ ' inmm mmmmmmmmmmmmm 




Charles Jenkins 




VARSITY- Back Row: Coach Richard Cummings, 
David Williams, Thomas Henry, Ray Shepard, 
Charles Jenkins, Robby Newell Front Row: Scott 
McCall, Pete Guitterez, John Kuhn, Mark Jaro- 
sinski, Steve Shepard 



FROSH — Back Row: Coach Bob Tremain, James 
Fields, Tim Nugent, Robert Taylor, Chris Agee, 
Coach John Veza Front Row: Mark Young, Kevin 
King, Jim McCall, Kevin Fields, Bob Jennings 





J.V.-Back Row: David Smith, Paul Huston, Mi- 
chael Shannon Front Row: Steve Nicks, Larry 
Scott 



Wrestling/83 




-1/ 




1. SOPHOMORE Mark Jarosinski battles his opponent during a sectional match. 2. THOMAS Henry 
fights to keep his position during sectional competition. 3. JUNIOR John Kuhn struggles his oppo- 
nent to keep from being pinned. 4. STEVE Shepard attempts to reverse his opponent. 5. SOPH- 
OMORE Jeff Shriver prepares to set his opponent in an arm drag. 





Wrestling/85 



Fisher captures city and sectional 



|or the last two years, John 
Marshall's golf team has placed second 
in the city and fourth in the sectionals. 
Also, they were named city champions 
in 1973. The team has faced some 
tough competition from teams such as 
North Central, Cathedral, and Warren 
Central. 
The team consisted of six members 



and their coach David Smartz. Smartz 
has coached the team seven years of 
Marshall's eleven-year history. 

The golf season started in March and 
continued into June. The players prac- 
ticed daily at local courses. 

The two top scorers of the season 
were John Fisher and Doug Reed. John 
Fisher was named City and Sectional 
champ. 



SENIOR Doug Reed and Sophomore Kent Von Burg tee off at Old Oakland, one of the nicest courses in 
the area. 

GOLF Team, Front Row: Kent Von Burg, Kevin Russell, Gregg Marsh, Ronald Vellor, Back Row: Coach 
Smartz, Jay Burleson, Jay Cain, John Fisher, Doug Reed. 




86/Golf 





Bowling team 
unbeaten 

^^owling is an exciting and chal- 
lenging sport. It takes much balance, 
skill, and strategy to be a good bowler, 
said bowler Tom Carson. Some people 
bowl for enjoyment, on leagues or for 
money. 

Some high schools have bowling 
leagues. John Marshall's bowling team 
is one of the best. They have won all of 
their games so far this season. Mar- 
shall's team has been organized for five 
years and this is the fifth year they have 
been playing in the Greater Indianapolis 
High School Bowling League. Team 
members are given to each team and a 



regular schedule is set up by the secre- 
tary of Arlington's team, Mr. Zetyl. 
They bowled three games each week. 
Each school had a chance to bowl 
against every other school. Eleven 
games are played in a season. 

The coach of the team was Nicholas 
Pipino and the president was Tom Car- 
son. The top players this year were 
Randy Cartwright, Rick Houk, Tom Car- 
son, and Jeff Taggert. Secretary David 
Moore said, "We've got a pretty good 
team this year, better than last year!" 

TIM McCoy, a senior kegler, is on the approach at 
Northeastwood Bowl. 

RICK Houck, during afternoon league, attempts 
to throw a strike. 

THE result, a nine-pin count and another try for 
a spare. 

WELL, better luck next time. 



Bowling/87 



Ihe 



Naturalist Club Had Busy Year 



ie John Marshall High School 
Naturalist Club began its eighth year of 
operation with the installing of the 
1977-78 officers. The election for offi- 
cers was Sept. 9 and the results were 
Joan Kane— President, Dan Schulge— 
Vice President, Peggy LaCroix— Secre- 
tary and James Hammond— Treasurer. 
Randy Lamb was the sponsor. 

The first scheduled trip was taken on 
Sept. 17 to Mary Gray Bird Sanctuary. 
Each year the trip is taken so that any 
work which needs to be done at Mary 
Gray can be carried out quickly and ef- 
fectively because of the great number 
of participants from the Naturalist Club. 

The accomplishments at Mary Gray 
ranged from the clearing of tree over- 
growth to a game of frisbie-football. On 
the way home from the trip, the officers 
decided with the sponsor, to stop at an 
archeological dig, where the bones of a 
Mastadon were recently discovered. Al- 
though the service of the group was of- 
fered, the work which was going on was 
predominantly cleaning up, using large 
equipment. 

The next trip'was the annual Thanks- 
giving trip to Spring Mill. This trip was a 
big success, mainly because of the large 
number of participants and the careful 
planning done by the Council. Coopera- 
tion and a spirit of good will aided in 
the success of the trip. The prayer of 
Thanksgiving was said by Neil 
Brumbaugh, the co-sponsor of the trip. 
His prayer was followed by a huge feast 
which was made up of pitch-in food 



brought by all those attending. Many 
alumni showed up for the trip, adding a 
dimension of nostalgia to the atmo- 
sphere of Thanksgiving. Some of those 
who came were Bill Brammel, Kenny 
Williams, Jack Stephenson, Steve 
Pauley and Mike Young. 

The numerous sponsors who attended 
included Mr. and Mrs. Neil 
Braumbaugh, David and Mary 
Braumbaugh, Randy Lamb and Shan- 
non Lamb, Lisa Smith, Bernie Collier, 
Brenda Dyke and Martin Shelbecker. 

December is always marked with the 
presence of the Naturalist Club Christ- 
mas Party. Although Jolly Old St. Nick 
was unable to attend because of pre- 
vious commitments, all those who at- 
tended will always remember the gag 
gifts which were distributed and the 
abundance of good food and Christmas 
cheer. 

In January, the New Year was es- 
corted in by the Winter Frolic at Poka- 
gon State Park. The biggest attraction 
of this bi-annual trip was the toboggan 
sled which can maintain speeds of up to 
60 mph. The beauty of this winter won- 
derland was reason enough for the 
many participants who attended this 
trip. 

With the arrival of spring came the 
birding season. The Naturalist Club pro- 
vided several trips as an aid to the 
sophomores in Biology who needed to 
gain birding experience. Two trips were 
to Jasper-Polaski, Salle and Willow 
Slough, so that all those who wished to 



&&*%*% 




attend were able to. The trips were 
taken on consecutive Saturdays in 
March and were attended by over 200 
students. * 

April was the month for the trip to 
McCormick's Creek, a state park of In- 
diana. This trip provided an atmosphere 
of peacefulness and serenity to the 
many who attended it. The trip was 
highlighted by several trail hikes and a 
great game of Softball. A picnic lunch 
was shared by all those who came and 
this spring's trip was a great success. 

The next trip, the birding trip to Point 
Pele, was a trip attended by pre- 
dominantly upper class who were skilled 
bird watchers. This two-day trip was 
highlighted by numerous new birds 
sighted and the sight seeing tour of Ni- 
agara Falls. Saturday night was spent in 
log cabins which provided an atmo- 
sphere of the true meaning of 
"Naturalist". 

The last trip of the year was the hon- 
ors trip attended by eight of the most 
active members. The trip was taken to 
Turkey Run and provided a last chance 
for those graduating seniors to have a 
final visit with those who they have 
grown to respect and admire so much 
through the Naturalist Club. It was also 
the final time to reflect on previous ex- 
periences with the Naturalist Club and 
to remember cherished moments which 
occurred and as always, a good time 
was had by all. 

—Joan Kane 



I 



4 





88/Naturalist Club 




Naturalist Club/89 



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91 



Skating 
at JMHS 



:-■.'.' 



T 



he JMHS Skating Club, spon- 
sored by LaMar Barnett, was organized 
for the purpose of perpetuating per- 
sonal development of skating skills 
through practice, exhibition and 
competition. 

There were approximately 15 to 25 
members in the JMHS Skating club. Of- 
ficers were First President— Larry So- 
well, President— Jackie Henry, Vice 
President— James Dennis, Secretary- 
Monica Cardwell, Assistant Secretary— 
Vicki Flowers, Treasurer— Freddie Davis, 
Assistant Treasurer— Terri Rowe, Chap- 
lain—Vanessa Cummings, Business 
Agent and Club Reporter— Yolonda Nor- 
wood and Announcer— Darrel Mix. 




FRONT Row: Treasurer Diane Goldman, Vice President Ann Landes, President 
Dave Barnard, Alumni Secretary Vicki Williams, Patricia Cromwell. Second Row: 
Larry Lynch, Luann Miller, Patricia Montgomery, Karen Wever, Lynda Stucker, 



Louis Norris, Ramond Morrison, Scott Carder. Back Row: Joe DeVore, Mark 
McKinley, Brad Rowe, Brian Fanning. 



Senior leaders at JMHS direct their year 



92 




RAINTREE FLORIST 

3734 NORTH MITTHOEFFER ROAD 
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 46236 

PHONE: 899-5522 

Tami Downton, Homecoming Queen, likes corsages from Raintree. 



The Administration 




Thomas Haynes 




Fred Jones 



James Rodeheffer 



C 

^^everal seniors have failed to have senior portraits taken 
in time for them to appear in the 1978 Marhiscan; however, we 
would like to recognize them as members of the 1978 gradu- 
ating class. 



ADAMS, SANDRA M. 
ALLEN, ANTHONY D. 
BAKER, DARRYL 
BROWN, GLENN W. 
BRYANT, DENISE R. 
BRYANT, GLENN 
BURNS, PAUL 
BUTLER, LEDORA 
CARROLL, TONY 
CARTER, GALE D. 
CARTER, KENNETH 
CHOWNING, STEVE 
COOLEY, ROBINETTE 
COPES, PATRICK 
COPP, RONALD 
DAVIS, REBECCA 
DAY, LESTER 
DICKEY, REBECCA 
DUMES, TONY 
ELLIS, JACK 



feller, rhonda 
fischer, randall 
fuller, jeffery 
gaines, curtis 
garner, cheri 
griffin, steven 
grissom, laurie 
gardiman, gail 
harmon, william 
henry, thomas 
howard, leslie 
jackson, johnny 
johnson, brian 
logan, john 
lukacs jr. robert 
marks, bryan 
marshall, tondaleia 
massey, shirley 
Mckenzie, betty 
miller, james 



MILLER, TAYMOND 
MILLIGAN, MICHAEL 
MOGOLLON, MARGARITA 
MOORE, DAVID 
MOORE, SCOTT 
NELSON, STEPHANIE 
NEWBOLT, ANDREA 
NORRIS, LOUIS 
PADGETT, SANDRA 
PARDS, GERALD 
PATTON, JIMMIE 
PRINCE, JOSEPH 
REED, ALLISON 
REINERT, JOHN 
RIMMER, CATHY 
RIPPY, CATHERINE 
SADLER, BRUCE 
SIMPSON, ROBERT 
SKELLEY, DEAN 
SKIRVIN, CHRIS 



SMITH, ROBERT 
SMITH, SANDRA 
SMITH, TONY 
SPARKS, DEBRA 
TATE, SIDNEY 
WHITE, JAMEY 
TAYLOR, RITA 
TAYOLR, TIMOTHY 
TUCKER, RONALD 
VENABLE, ROBYNE 
WADE, CLINTON 
WATKINS, MERRILL 
WESTERFIELD, STEVEN 
WHITNEY, EDWARD 
WILLIAMS, AUGUSTUS 
WRIGHT, DAVID 
YOWELL, GREGORY 



93 





Do you remember 
the blizzard of '78? 



UJ 



mat's it like to be snowed in for 
at least one day? Most Marshall stu- 
dents had their chance to find out last 
January when, what has been called, 
the worst snow storm in Hoosier history 
hit. 

The heavy snow, raging wind began 
on the afternoon of Wednesday, Janu- 
ary 25, and continued until early Friday 
morning. When the siege finally lifted, 
there was more than 20 inches of snow 
on the ground and drifts almost twice 
as high. Our own 38th Street was 
plugged shut from drifts. Four wheeled 
drive vehicles opened a new driveway to 
bypass the car-high snow. 

It took days for the state to dig itself 
out and the schools, too. JMHS was 
closed from January 26 to the following 
Wednesday, February 1. A vacation 
from school, however, was also a vaca- 
tion from everything else. If you were 
one of the few who braved the storm, 
about the only place open to go to was 
the local grocery where you could fight 
to get some of the basic food staples- 
like milk, bread, and eggs. However, 
most of the 80 "South Pacific" cast slid 
to school for noon rehearsals on Mon- 
day and Tuesday. They even had a fire 
drill. The icy ruts and the chuck holes 
were around for months! 

But now the snow is melted and only 
the memories remain. Yes, you'll prob- 
ably say, "I remember the blizzard of 
'78 . . . 






'.r^--* 









94 /Blizzard 




. 











.&■ ■;>•■** ■ f!-\\- <, y\ ______ 








Blizzard/95 




Hi-fi m 





Deca helps students 
prepare for future 



MIKE Cheatham fills out a report while at work at 
Rodeway Inn. 



96/ Distributive Education 



distributive Education refers to 
vocational education for those preparing 
for or engaged in distributing goods and 
services to the public, including all re- 
tail, wholesale and service occupations. 
Distributive Education offers prepara- 
tory instruction for students desiring to 
explore distribution as a career, seeking 
a broader knowledge of the principles of 
free enterprise, or building a foundation 
for continuing education related to dis- 
tribution. Its purpose is also to provide 
through vocational instruction for indi- 
viduals already employed or preparing 
to enter those occupations followed by 
owners, managers or employees in 
distribution. 

Distributive Education is an example 
of cooperative instruction, requiring the 
joint interest and efforts of the school, 
the distributive business and the com- 
munity. All three benefit: The schools 
are providing meaningful instruction. 
The employers are obtaining more effi- 



cient personnel. The community is get- 
ting better consumer services and more 
prosperous, efficient business. 

Distributive education is a program of 
instruction in marketing, merchandis- 
ing, and management. The program is 
concerned with the instruction needed 
for the updating and upgrading of em- 
ployee knowledge for career devel- 
opment and for operational 
management. 

Distributive education is part of the 
local public school system, receiving fi- 
nancial support from local, state, and 
federal funds. Teacher-coordinators are 
locally employed, and each particular 
program is fed into the needs of the 
community. 

Distributive education provides a flex- 
ible program that functions as part of 
the total education plan. It can be 
adapted to the needs of both large and 
small communities. 




JULIE Shepherd returns change to a customer as 
she works at the store where she is cashier. 

Just Us show 
students' work 



he JMHS Just Us Club, spon- 
sored by Nancy Williams, composed a 
literary magazine of poems and short 
stories of students of JMHS. The Just 
Us members collected material from 
different English teachers to put into 
the book. 

There were approximately 20 to 30 
members in the Just Us Club. Officers 
were President— Rob Tarter, Vice Presi- 
dent—Joanna Daughtery, Secretary- 
Stephanie Jones, Treasurer— Karen 
McCall, Historian— Susan McGinley and 
Public Relations— Cathy Burnam. 

Judy Tilley's design won the cover 
contest; her design will be published as 
the '78 cover design. 



ROB Tarter listens to sponsor Nancy Williams as she explains the procedure of putting The Just Us 
Book together. 




A fellow Just Us Member looks on as Cathy 
Burnam types material for the Just Us Book. 



Just Us/97 




KEY CLUB: FOURTH ROW: Robert Davids, Bob Hoffman. THIRD 
ROW: Frank Frost, Tim McMillian, Jim Huston, Pete Riely, Bob 
Gray, James Fairley, Mike Shannon, Mike Dye, Gary Davis, Marke 
Sausser, Harold Piride, David Roberts, David Otto. SECOND ROW: 
Danny Lewis, Quentin Simmons, Scott Tarter, John Cutshaw, Bob 

Z-CLUB: TOP ROW: Darla Forbis, Tammy Crawley, Sheri Hanson, 
Elaine Partridge, Kim White, Susan Engelking, Michele Mattingly, 
Caroline Himnan, Linda Brezausek, Renee Lacy. MIDDLE ROW: Jen- 
nifer Chapman, Martha Wright, Mary Crouch, Patty Theyssen, Kel- 



Tarter, John Adams, Danny Utter, Mike Phipps, Dan Dlakslay, Jeff 
Newman. FIRST ROW: Jr. Rep. Dion Wolfe, Second Vice President 
Steve Preston, President Dan Crouch, Secretary Nick Hopkins, Soph. 
Rep. Wes Gainey, Treasurer Chip Jacobs. 



lee Meyer, Monica Barnett, Jennifer Klutey. BOTTOM ROW: Vice 
President Trish Montgomery, Secretary Karen Weaver, President 
Lynda Stucker. 




KEY Club sponsors David Otto and David 
Roberts enjoy a good dinner at the Key 
Club Convention in French Lick, Indiana. 






98/Z Club 



- 



Key Club and Z-Club Help Out 



I he many activities and services 
performed by the John Marshall Key 
Club are what gave them the status of 
sixth club in the State. 

During the 1977-78 school year, the 
Key Club helped the Kiwanis with their 
annual peanut sale and sold peanuts 
here at school to raise money for differ- 
ent projects. The Christmas Can Drive 
from November 28 to December 19 was 
a big success again thanks to the stu- 
dents. During February the club sold 
suckers for Alpha Phi which donated 
the money to the heart fund. The sec- 
ond Rugby tournament was moved from 
fall to spring so the players wouldn't 
freeze while running around in shorts. 
The proceeds from this project went to 
Pleasent Run Childrens' Home. 

The Club also sent delegates to the 
State Convention which was in French 
Lick, Indiana. At the State Convention 
members learned about and saw what 
other clubs were doing and helped elect 
State officers. The club planned to send 
at least four delegates to the Inter- 
national Convention which was in Mi- 
ami, Florida. 

— Dan Crouch 




In easily overlooked club at Mar- 
shall was the Z-Club. The name didn't 
mean much to most students since few 
students could identify it with Zonta In- 
ternational, the sponsoring organization. 
The Z-Club was a girls service organiza- 
tion and its activities were not ones 
which got publicized. Many of its 
projects were geared toward the com- 
munity and other groups outside the 
school, but it also performed services 
throughout the school year. 

Service being the club's major objec- 
tive, all duties the girls performed were 
strictly voluntary. Z-Girls were seen 
ushering at programs in the auditorium, 
helping lost parents find their class- 
rooms during open house, serving re- 
freshments at the Junior-Senior Prom 
and helping in any way possible at all 
other school functions. 

Reaching outside of the school doors, 
the Z-Club spent a great deal of time 
with the Children's Guardian Home. The 



i 



girls took the children to the Haunted 
House, made Christmas stockings for 
them, had an Easter Egg Hunt and hos- 
ted picnics at the Zoo. The girls also de- 
voted time to collecting money for the 
Mental Health Toy Shop with which 
gifts were purchased for mental health 
patients to give to members of their 
families at Christmas. 

Since the organization is an honorary 
club, members are chosen from appli- 
cants received from selective applicants. 

In the past the Z-Club has done fairly 
well, but I know it could be better. This 
year we hope to bring more recognition 
to the club as well as to perform more 
services for the benefit of all. I feel we 
can achieve our goal with the enthusi- 
astic support we have from our sponsor 
Mrs. Hardwick," stated President 
Lynda Stucker. 



— Lynda Stucker 



I 




Z-CLUBBER Kellee Meyer along with Key Clubbers Danny Litter and Dan Crouch enjoy an afternoon of 
fun with kids from the Children's Guardian Home. 



DAN Crouch tries desperately to count the infinite 
amounts of cans that were collected during the 
annual Key Club Can Drive. 



Key Club/99 




THE Concert Choir practices energetically everyday with warm-ups and songs such as "The National Anthem' 
and "Fight Song" and many others. The many voices mingle to form the sound of the Concert Choir. 



The School Song' 



Singing along 
with the 

Concert Choir 

brings fun 

to many 



he 1977-78 Concert Choir is the 
largest choir ever boasted by John Mar- 
shall. It consists of 67 dedicated musi- 
cians directed by Cynthia Fetheringill 
and accompanied by Kenya Brooks. 

The Choir works hard toward achiev- 
ing certain goals and perfect blend. 
Some of the goals for this year were 
high-quality performances at Patriots 
on Parade, where they performed as a 
swing choir, the Yuletide Concert and 
the Calvacade of Music in the spring. 

The Christmas season was the busiest 
time of year for the choir. They went on 
tour, along with the small performing 
ensembles, to grade schools, shopping 
malls, nursing homes, and various clubs 
to bring the Christmas spirit to their 
audiences. Just before the winter vaca- 
tion, the Yuletide Concert was 
presented by the Music Department. 
The show included the Marshallaires, 
Liberty Belles, Sons of Liberty, and all 
the large ensembles, and culminates 
with the Concert Choir and Christmas 
Carols. 

The choir members tried to faster 
feelings of fellowship among the mem- 
bers with such activities as building a 
float for the Homecoming contest which 
they won in their division, parties for all 



members and participation in the Fam- 
ily Fun Night. 

Near the end of the year, the choral 
music department had a dinner show 
called "Feast v n' Follies", which in- 
cluded the three small ensembles, solo 
and comedy acts and other types of 
musical talent. Most choir members 
participated in some way. 

This year more than twenty JMHS 
choir members participated in the All- 
City Choir. Another annual highlight was 
the All-City Choir Festival, in which all 
the city's high schools participated by 
sending their choirs to show off their 
year's endeavors. 

Handling such a variety of activities 
was hard work, and Mrs. Featheringill 
was assisted by the choir's Officers 
Council, composed this year of Co-Pres- 
idents Donna Adams and Warren Smith, 
Secretary Laura Spires, Sergeant-at- 
Arms Bob Weaver, and Junior Repre- 
sentative Tami Prunty. These people 
spent a great deal of time helping carry 
out the choir's traditions, the daily ex- 
ercises, and the extra activities. 

The choir worked hard all year, and I 
am proud to say that I am a member of 
the John Marshall Concert Choir. 

—Warren Smith 



100/Concert Choir 




CYNTHIA Featheringill conducts the Choir in "The National Anthem," most 
mornings to warm up voices, rusty from sleep. 



Concert Choir/101 



X 



Typing can benefit all 



ie Business Education Depart- 
ment's main purpose was to offer bene- 
ficial electives for each student regard- 
less of the person's future plans. For 
the student who plans on full time em- 
ployment immediately after high school, 
classes were offered so he could obtain 
the education and training that will help 
him in beginning jobs. The person who 
will need part time or summer jobs to 
help pay for the expense of additional 
schooling was also able to obtain the 
skills and knowledge needed to find jobs 
during this time. Students planning to 
pursue business training in college could 
gain an excellent background for fur- 
ther study by enrolling in business 
courses at Marshall. Of course any stu- 



dent could benefit by taking two semes- 
ters of typewriting. 

The wise student could select from 
the courses available the ones that 
would best qualify him for his future 
plans. Since the average high school girl 
can expect to work at least 25 years 
outside the home during her lifetime, 
training received now can pay dividends 
many years in the future. Many stu- 
dents who enroll in college never finish 
and need to obtain full-time employ- 
ment after one or two years in college. 
Business courses taken in high school 
can give the background and informa- 
tion these people will need to obtain 
jobs when they are ready to enter the 
labor market. 





TYPING can be beneficial to both boys and girls. 
Typing can help you when typing term papers in 
both high school and in college. 



JUNIOR Cheryl Tiffany seems to enjoy herself as 
she plucks away at the keys of an electric type- 
writer in advanced typing. 



102/ Business 





THESE students take some time before typing SOPHOMORE Dana Adams practices her typing 



class to work on their art project. Many typists pattern to insure that her final copy is without a 

come in before and after school to make up work. mistake. 





ABOVE: Patricia Sahm, Kenneth George. Below: 
David Russell, David Smartz. 




ABOVE: Sandra Lucas, Jean Potts. Below: Ta- 
bitha Gillespie, Barbara Robertson. 



SHORTHAND, one of the more difficult courses 
offered in business education is not always work; 
these girls talk before class. 





LEFT: Janet Weaver. Below: Bessie Conn, Mary 
Vinton 



■ . ,1 




Business/103 



Scott retires, 
advance class 
move to tech 



etirement is when you reach 
that stage in life when you can use the 
fruits of your trade," stated Clifton 
Scott, the head of the Industrial Arts 
Department. At the end of the school 
year Mr. Scott is retiring after 39 years 
of teaching. 

Along with him goes all the advance 
courses in industrial arts including in- 
cluding the entire Aerospace and Voca- 
tional Masonary programs. These pro- 
grams will no longer be at John 
Marshall. They will be offered at Arsenal 
Technical High School next year to en- 
large and promote the growth of career 
education. This is another part of the 
options programs. Also, will be the new 
school of programming arts at Short- 
ridge and the health careers program at 
Crispus Attucks. 

There are about 720 students in the 
Industrial Arts program. Scott stated 
that he enjoyed every minute of his 
teaching career at John Marshall be- 
cause as he saw the students grow in 
their skills, he also grew in his 
education. 




JIMMY Ranger works on silk screening in his in- 
dustrial arts class. Other types of printing were 
taught. 



MARK Fleming shows two correct styles for 
painting a car in auto body class. 




104/Industrial Arts 




SANDING down the rough edges on the finish, as THE workings of all types of engines was learned 
this student does here, was another skill taught in in power machines. These students take a test on 
Auto Body. parts of a car engine. 



ABOVE: Top Row: Lowell Hester, Daniel Johnson, 
Thomas Van Lieu, Paul Justice. Second Row: 
Martin Coble, Emmit Faulkenberg, Harold Brown, 
James Stohler. Bottom Row: Clifton Scott. Not 
shown: Lemar Barnett, Robert Chisley. 




Industrial Arts/ 105 



21 Male 

Students Enroll 

in Home Ec. 

Dept. this year 




for future homemakers and 
sometimes professional use, Marshall 
students acquired knowledge in cloth- 
ing, foods, family living, child devel- 
opment, housing and family health. 
Some 546 students were enrolled in the 
various classes offered by the Home 
Economics department. 

Clothing includes the study of fabrics 
and fashion design. Students improve 
sewing skills and develop better taste in 
dress. In foods students are taught to 

THESE students look expectingly toward their next 
cook but also table setting and manners. 



prepare, plan and serve well-balanced 
meals. Emphasis is placed on wise con- 
sumer practices. 

Family living places emphasis on per- 
sonality development, family inter-rela- 
tionship, preparation for marriage, 
modern family life and child devel- 
opment. Equal rights for men came to 
Home Economics this year as 21 male 
students enrolled in several of the 
classes offered by the Home Ec. De- 
partment. Mrs. Marilyn Johannessen, 

course in foods class. Students not only learned to 



department head, is pleased with the 
enrollment of males in her department. 
She stated, "The male should be a 
more active member of the family; he 
should be aware of what is going on in 
the home." 

Although usually not seen under fa- 
vorable circumstances, an important 
member of Marshall's staff is Mrs. Mar- 
tha Frances, the school nurse. The task 
of deciding which students are really 
sick and which students are suffering 
from the desire to leave school early is a 
task that even a well-trained physician 
would have trouble with. 






A 




THIS advanced home ec student models her full 
length coat which she made in class. 

APPLIQUE is also included in clothing. 

SEWING together the individual patches is the final 
step in making a patchwork quilt. 




Home Ec/107 




THE students in ROTC learn how to handle and 
master firearms along with other military skills. 



THE COLOR guard carries the American and State flags in parades, and other such events. 






€*§-♦ 






THE officers of the JMHS ROTC lead the unit in the Veteran's Day Parade. 



The JR. ROTC has a summer program offered to 
students. Here is one unit, standing at attention. 



108/ROTC 




OFFICERS-BACK ROW: Phil Davis, Bobbie Sandefur, Bill Boehmr, Charles Jenkins, Michael Cheatham 
Front Row: Joy Gibbon, David Kain. 




THE JMHS ROTC, led by Michael Cheatham, marched in the Veteran's Day Parade. 



ROTC teaches 
military life 

I I any students at JMHS belonged 
to the Reserve Officers Training Corps 
(ROTC). The ROTC program here at 
JMHS was sponsored by Sgt. William 
Pennington and Sgt. Bruce Blauvelt. 
ROTC teaches a student the proper use 
of firearms, the courtesies and military 
tactics of army personnel and in- 
troduces the military to high school 
students. 

JMHS ROTC had three major groups 
or teams that had specific duties. The 
Color Guard was responsible for the 
putting up and taking down of the flag 
each morning outside of the school. 
They also put up the flag at all of the 
home football and basketball games and 
other school functions. The Rifle Team 
competed in shooting matches against 
other schools and against themselves 
and the Drill Team competed in drill 
meets with either rifles or marching. 
The whole unit participated in the Vet- 
eran's Day parade. 

"ROTC is beneficial to your future if 
you plan on going into the service," said 
John Adams, a student in the JMHS 
ROTC program. 




ROTC/ 109 




Want 
to make 
a movie, a 
cartoon, 
maybe? Well, at 
JMHS it was pos- 
sible under the direc- 
tion of English teacher, 
Greg Shelton. Shelton 
taught Art of Film, a course on 
the history of movies and film 
making. The students watched films 
and wrote critical essays on them to 
earn their grade. He also teaches Film 
Productions which deals more with the 
actual making of movies. Most of Shel- 
ton's major film productions were made 
out of class. The first film, Prometheus 
took four years to make and the second 
"The Two Crows" took two years. "The 
Two Crows" got coverage in "The Star" 
and "The News", the "Star Magazine" 
and some local news stations. An inter- 
nationally shown television show "The 
Big Blue Marble" came to Marshall to 
film a reenactment of the making of the 
eight-minute cartoon which will be 
shown in two segments. 






A 

handful 
of, at the 
time, eager 
students sacri- 
ficed their*Veterans 
Day weekend to the 
film crew of "The Big 
Blue Marble". They worked 
from approximately nine in the 
morning to all hours of the night, 
in frigid Marshall acting out the pro- 
cess of making "The Two Crows", which 
many knew nothing about since they 
weren't the original workers. The actual 
cartoon was made mostly by already 
graduated students who gave up their 
free periods in school and much of their 
free time to the process. It took almost 
two years to complete the film. Many 
hours were spent cramped in a small 
room hidden in one of the storage 
rooms and in the basement of Shelton's 
home. Shelton provided for most sup- 
plies needed himself. 




110/Shelton 




How long did it take? 

m 'r\ 

l^id you realize it's only 9:00 in 
the morning and we're at school, on a 
Saturday!" 

"Haven't they ever heard of heat in 
this place?" 

"When are we having lunch? Now! 
Well all we have to do is agree on one 
place— Pizza? No ; Hamburgers! How 
about Tacos?!" 

"Does anyone REALLY know what 
they're doing." 

"Can we go home now, I mean, it's 
past midnight!" 

"What, we're locked out of the 
room?" 

"Where's the key? You think someone 
stole it!" 

"Oh great, it's open! How did you get 
in? You CLIMBED the wall outside and 
came in the window. I thought the spi- 
derman story was fiction!" 

"Mr. Shelton, your wife called. She 
FOUND the key in YOUR coat pocket! 
And you accused us of stealing it!" 

"Oh great, an electric heater!" 

"Hey how's come all the lights went 
out!?" 

"It's either heat or lights and we have 
to have light." 

"Hey good, Pizza. How much was all 
this? Fifty dollars for pizza!" 

"Wake up everyone, it's time to go 
home. If you hurry, you can make it for 
the late movie." 






Shelton/lll 



Career Ed keeps students in jobs, money 



"ohn Marshall has traditionally 
had one of the finest career education 
programs in the city, and this year was 
no different. The three staff members 
were Brenda Dyke, Jan Reel and 
Wanda Brittian. They divided up the job 
of finding and preparing students for 
work. They also teach the career ed. 
class. 

Brittain, the director of the project, 
stated, "Career education is open to 
help all students find jobs." The pro- 
gram consists of two basic parts which 
Brittain oversees. One part is the ca- 
reer ed. class which is headed by Dyke. 
This class is offered to sophomores and 
is designed to prepare them for inter- 
views and other problems of job hunt- 
ing. The purpose of the class is to talk 
to the students to determine the type of 
job that they would be happy doing. The 
second part of the program was headed 
by Reel, the coordinator. Her job is to 
find work for students in career educa- 
tion and to check on students already 
placed in positions to make sure that 
everybody is happy. 



JULIE Shepherd and Bob Williams enjoy a rest 
after a hard days work at Prestons. 




MANING her lonely sentry in the Photomat booth 
across from the school is senior 



ERIN Inlow. Her job was 
reer Education program 



secured for by the Ca- 
here at Marshall. 




112/Vocational Ed 




NO, not the invasion of the masked men, just an BODY shop, another facet of D.E., is one of the 
example of the correct welding technique. more popular classes in the program. 



MARK Bristow, like many other D.E. students, 
spends his working hours in a local eatery. 




Vocational Ed/113 



Students make 

profit from 

sale of goods 

I | ANY art classes are available to 
students in the field of art, ranging 
from Jewelry to Commercial Art. Each 
class deals in development of good taste 
and fine artistic judgement for the fu- 
ture use of each student. 

One of the most popular of freshman 
courses is Craft Design. In this class 
students make different projects such 
as leather-look bottles, string pictures, 
soap carvings, three dimensional figures 
and many other creative projects. 

Another popular course among stu- 
dents is jewelry. In this class, students 
make rings, necklaces, and chokers with 
different types of stones in them. This 
course is fun to work with and is also 
very profitable. For example, it might 
cost a student three to four dollars to 
make a ring and then it could be sold 
for a profit. 

The double period art classes are a 
full credit and the single period art 
classes are a half credit. 

Teachers not pictured include Nicholas Logsdon 
and Margaret Phillips. 




JULIE Brown, Dorria Ball and Debbie Young 
team up to produce a paper mache pinata by us- 



ing skills learned in Craft Art class. Art students 
make great use of their skills in other classes. 



FRESHMAN Stephanie Jones and Junior Michelle 
Dunlop share their art skills in the preparation of 



this poster for Just Us. The practical uses of art 
skills benefits the students in many ways. 




114/Art 




Edward Ring 



Rod Shaw 



Michael Slabaugh 



NINA Smith shows correct procedure on forming 
an object out of a block of wood. Wood carving is 
one project explored in Craft Arts. 



TAMMY Daugherty sands down the rough edges 
on her Crafts project. Woodworking was a major 
part of the Crafts class. 



Barbara Frauhiger 

THIS student studies his ceramics project trying 
to fugure what the next step should be. Ceramics 
was a popular class in the art dept. 




u Math For All" 

program helps 

enrollment 



I n the math wing, enrollment was 
on the increase this year due to the 
hard work of the Math department, es- 
pecially Department Head Robert Carr. 
Either Basic Math, General Math, Al- 
gebra 1, Pre-algebra or for a select few 
Algebra 3 must be taken. However, 
many students who drop most of their 
academic classes their junior and senior 
year still take math classes. 

Carr states that the reason so many 
students continued to take math after 
their required year was because they 
realize the importance of math in future 
life, even if college is not in their plans, 
and that the "Math For All" program 
was tailored to everyone's need. Under 
this program even a poor math student, 
say one who starts in general math, can 
obtain the algebra and geometry by the 
time they graduate. Even a student who 
starts in basic math and shows good 
progress can take algebra if he is inter- 
ested in math. This was the principle of 
the entire program. If a student was in- 
terested in math, then there was a 
math class for him to take. 

Another factor in the program was 
the computer math class. Three differ- 
ent levels of computer math were 
taught, which means that the amount 
of work one could do on the computer 
was limited only by the amount of math 
one knows. The computer was open to 
all students who have the class before 
and after school. 

QUIZ team members Harald Pride, Bob Weaver, 
Mark Sausser and Peter Riley, used their math 
skills to help them advance to the third round. 




SENIOR Michael Cheatham points out some of 
the features of the math wing to an eighth 
grader. 



SENIOR Patty Chilcote works on her Calculus 
exam. Patty is one of 28 students who are in fifth 
year math. 



116/Math 











LEFT: Gwendolyn Reed, Sharon Holmes, Gayle 
Miner. Below left: Alan Norris, David Roberts, 
V.M. Ellur, Robert Carr. Not shown: James Malin, 
Esther Sanger, Desmond Smith and Frank 
Thompson. 



ALEX Busto thinks over a tough question in Ad- 
vanced Math class. Better move on to the next 
one Alex. 



THIS student takes time out to complete her 
homework. Homework was a daily task in most 
math classes. 





Math/117 



Scatterball A 



and Track big 
favorite in P.E. 



well-rounded program was what 
P.E. head Ted Pollack strived for in his 
required gym classes. Even the most 
unathletic student was sure to find a par- 
ticular activity which he enjoyed or ex- 
celled in. Pollack said that the area that 
most students did well in was track and 
field. Pollack remarked, "There was 
enough variety in this area to satisfy al- 
most every athletic ability. There were 
sprints for fast kids, throwing events for 
strong kids, and running events for kids 
with endurance." There was definately a 
lot of pressure on the students to excell 
in gym. They often hated gym for that 
reason. Students who were not athletic 
were often put down by some of the 
stronger pupils. For the most part, how- 



ever students enjoyed gym and even 
looked forward to the period they had it. 

Health was another class that is re- 
quired to graduate and, often, was not 
much of a favorite. The chore of studying 
about the body was made a little easier 
by the teaching methods of Brad Goffi- 
net. Notebooks and health articles helped 
to boost a students' grade if he fouled up 
on a test. Students survived though and 
some even learned a little. 

— Mark Sausser 



ARCHING her shot high toward the basket, Eliza- 
beth Williams enjoys a friendly game of basketball, 
while her opponent keeps up a sticky defense. 

LEROY Leach watches his teammate's shot after 
it is partially blocked during P.E. 







118/P.E. 




TUMBLING is one of those activities in gym which 
most students don't really care for. These freshmen 
girls, however, seem to be quite able in performing 
this difficult exercise. Tumbling can be dangerous 
and is best not practiced alone. 

ONE of the favorite activites in gym is scatterball. 
Here Marci Akins put a player out. 




P.E./119 




MIKE Cheatham shows the Cabinet Members a product that the Student Council could sell to earn 
money for projects. The t-shirt with the facial print out was considered. 



120/Senior 







PRESIDENT Mike Cheatham and Secretary Ann Landes read and discuss a report from the last Stu- 
dent Council Cabinet meeting. The 7:30 morning meetings kept the SC busy. 



S.C. helps 
JMHS spirit 

■ he Student Council was a coun- 
cil of students elected by the student 
body of JMHS to improve Marshall with 
student ideas. 

Sponsored by Benjamin Sanders, the 
Council met approximately twice a 
month during third period. Students in 
the Council were elected each semester 
from their third period class. 

The Student Council was led by Presi- 
dent Michael Cheatham and the rest of 
the Cabinet who were Scott Carder- 
First Vice President, Mark McKinley— 
Second Vice President, Ann Landes— 
Secretary, Lynda Stucker— Treasurer, 
Jack Edwards— Parliamentarian, David 
Owens— Parliamentarian, Ramon Morri- 
son—Chairman of Suggestions, John 
Kuhn— Appointee, Wes Gainey— Ap- 
pointee and Martha Wright— Appointee. 

The many activities of the Student 
Council this year were selling Christmas 
Messages and flowers, sponsoring Spirit 
Week and Senior Slave Day and spon- 
soring a Muscular Dystrophy fund drive. 




Senior/121 



Quill and 
Scoll, a reward 

T 

■ he Quill and Scroll Club wasn't 
really a club at all, it was a reward to 
those students who have been out- 
standing in Journalism. This was an in- 
ternational group of honorary juniors 
and seniors. 

There were about 15 members in the 
Quill and Scroll Club. These students 
had shown outstanding performance in 
copy writing editorials, photography, art 
work and business management. To be 
a part of this club students must have 
had at least one year of publications. 
The officers were President— Martha 
Wright, Vice President— Tom Browne, 
and Secretary-Treasurer— Diane 
Goldman. 

There is an initiation every year. The 
initiation is not what one would expect. 
In this case sponsor Jan Eberle takes 
the group to dinner and each member 
of the group receives a Quill and Scroll 
Magazine. 

The club's big event this year was 
sponsoring the Marion County Press 
Day, here at John Marshall. On this oc- 
casion, Martha Wright introduced spe- 
cial guest, Senator Richard Lugar. 




REPORTER Bonnie McGarr attentively listens as Editor Charles Jenkins explains how to write copy for 
the newspaper. 




QUILL and Scroll member, Micheal Cheatham 
teaches the workers on his page how to write sto 
ries for the Liberator. 



QUILL AND Scroll-Front Row: Joan Kane, Scott Worpell, Rick Smith, Lynda Stucker, Diane Goldman, 
Julie Bush. Back Row: Brian Johnson, Mark Sausser, Martha Wright, Brian Fanning, Tom Browne, 
Charles Jenkins. Others were inducted in April. 



122/Quill & Scroll 




PAT Cromwell shows leadership (which is one of the National Honor Society's guide) as she teaches 
students how to do a layout. 



Society for 
honor students 

I his year's JMHS National Honor 
Society, sponsored by Janet Weaver and 
Marion Burleson, was composed of 27 
members (all seniors). More members 
joined the Society in April. The officers 
of the National Honor Society were 
President— Susan Engelking; Vice-Pres- 
ident— Patrica Montgomery; Secre- 
tary—Karen Wever; and Treasurer- 
Mark Sausser. 

The National Honor Society was 
geared to recognize accomplishments of 
students in the society, to create enthu- 
siasm, to promote leadership and to de- 
velop character in students of American 
high schools. 

In choosing members for the Society, 
the sponsors had much to consider. 
They looked at the person's point aver- 
age (Juniors have to have 6.75 or 
above; Seniors 6.25 or above) and the 
number of times the person has been 
nominated for the society. 

The activities of the society were lim- 
ited this year. However, they did sell 
candy during April, and they partici- 
pated in the Family Fun Night to raise 
money to buy National Honor Society 
pins for new members. 




National Honor Society/123 



Typing is 
always fun! 



II too often the students who 
put the yearbook and newspaper to- 
gether are taken for granted by the rest 
of the student body. Little notice is 
taken of the work involved in tracking 
down a story, writing it, cropping pic- 
tures, and putting it all on a layout 
sheet. Here is a glimpse of what goes on 
behind the door of John Marshall's 
publications office. 

Scene: Room 236 deadline day. Above 
the banging of typewriter keys several 
voices may be heard: 

"CAN ANYBODY OUT THERE 
TYPE?" 

"I need a cutline for this picture." 

"What? Your story isn't finished yet!" 

"Where are my pictures, Brian? 
Rudy? Julie? Anybody?" 

"Will somebody please type this 
story?" 

"Ouch! My finger is stuck between 
"R" and "F". Where's the »K"?" 

"I need more copy!" 

Approximately 130 students work on 
the publications staff, earning one half 
credit each semester. 




THE many editors of the newspaper work many tedious hours constructing the Libertor that tells what's 
happening around JMHS. The editors of the newspaper Charles Jenkins, Tom Brown, and Diane Goldman 
went to the IU workshop last summer. 



YEARBOOK STAFF: First Row: Lynda Stucker, Mary Crouch, Mar- 
cia Ahlefeld, Brenda Walls, Martha Wright, Brian Fanning. Second 
Row: Cathy Stuart, Tammy Jent, Debbie Ponto, Peggy Bates, Deb- 



bie Meyer, Doneva Wheeler, Marie Church, Debbie Farley, Brian 
Johnson. Back Row: Scott Worpell, Mark Sausse and Jack Ellis. 




124/Publications 




THE News Bureau Staff: Sherri Todd, Sheryl Graves, Editor-Kathy Hawthorne, Donna Moore and 
Dawna Weeks write stories about JMHS for The TOPICS, THE NEWS AND STAR and many other 
papers. 

NEWSPAPER STAFF: First Row: Brian Johnson, Julie Bush, Tom Browne, Diane Goldman, Charles 
Jenkins, Joan Kane, Rick Smith, Danny Stevens, Mike Cheatham, Debbie Harner. Second Row: Jeff 
Opel, Sheryl Graves, Jennifer Klutey, Jill Stephenson, Kelly Wiseman, Sally Nickels, Theresa Hall, Tara 
Jones, Susan Watson, Dawn Summers, Lesia Mitchell, Mark McCurdy. Third Row: Tom Henry, La- 
Donna Mundy, Tony Black, Preston Cosby, Mike Dye, Kathy Ricky, Annette Hadley, Jackie Pease, Dave 
Shinkle, Dave Rowley, Dan Furbee, and Dan Crouch. 



Liberator 

goes to 8 pages 



Ihe Liberator told what hap- 
pened around JMHS. Co-editors Tom 
Browne and Charles Jenkins assigned 
and edited the stories of 50 reporters. 

The editors of the Marhiscan had the 
hectic job of making sure 192 pages of 
pictures and stories were in on time. 
Editors Marcia Ahlefeld, Brenda Walls, 
and Martha Wright directed the pro- 
duction of an accurate view of 1977-78 
Marshall life which included more color, 
better organization, and more variety in 
layouts. 

The News Bureau was the group of 
students that wrote for Indy East, The 
Topics, The Star, and The News. They 
let the community know what was going 
on at Marshall. There were four report- 
ers on the staff last fall led by Editor 
Kathy Hawthorne. More were added in 
spring. 

The photography staff, led by Mark 
Bristow and Julie Shepherd, consisted 
of 13 photographers who had a tough 
time trying to meet the demands made 
by the other staffs. 




Publications/125 



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* 





126/Seniors 



iz-kikirizizizizii 



bf if if if if if ^ 4 if if if ^ 



* 



Ul 



E'RE SENIORS! It doesn't 
seem possible." This is what we said 
when we registered last fall for the last 
time. That same phrase has been re- 
peated at every reminiscence of our 
years here at Marshall. Throughout the 
year we felt the responsibility of being 
looked up to by underclassmen and the 
embarrassment of being laughed at by 
these same underclassmen for our so 
called Senior stunts. The eternal com- 
mittee meetings paid off in cramped 
fingers from the tracing and cutting of 
Halloween and Valentine messages. 
Nervous time came in May when many 
wondered if they'd make the grades, 
others if they'd get into the schools 
they had chosen and nearly all suffered 



from two of the most dreaded diseases 
of all, Spring Fever and Senioritis. Plans 
for Senior Week slowly took form, help- 
ing to prepare us for the finale, com- 
mencement. We were proud to display 
our Senior Keys and proud of the nu- 
merous goals we set and achieved. Most 
of all we are hopeful as we face the 
future. 

The time spent studying all night for 
an exam, sharing a crowded locker, 
running to classes late, being in Senior 
"Study" (?), working on the floats, the 
Senior Breakfast Awards, Powderpuff, 
the Prom and Commencement will re- 
main in our minds forever. We are not 
only Seniors, "We are the Patriots, 
standing on the verge, RIGHT ON!" 




* 
* 
* 
* 




* * ¥ * * 




W. ACKERMAN 



D. AKLES 



S. ALLEGREE 



T. AGEE 




T, ALLEN 




ACKERMAN, WENDY 
ADAMS, DONNA 



AGEE, TERRY 
Student Council 



AHLEFELD, MARCIA 
Naturalists, Club, Prom Comm, Office Mes- 
senger, Quill and Scroll, Yearbook 

AILES, KIMBERLY 



AKLES, DAN 

Naturalists Club, Science Seminar 

ALLEGREE, SANDRA 

Prom Comm., Patriots on Parade, German 

Club 

ALLEN, TRUDY 

ALLGOOD, DALE 

Naturalists Club, Science Seminar, Academic 

Congress 

ALLSEITZ, ED 

Drama, Patriots on Parade, Key Club, Ger- 
man Club, Choir, Sons of Liberty, Feast and 
Follies 



ALLSEITZ, JENNIFER 

ARNDT, SARA 

Bus Ticket Office, Career Guidance Office 

ARCHIE, VICKIE 

ARNOLD, MARK 

Naturalists Club, ROTC Messenger, Radio 

Club, Stage Crew, Student Council, Color 

Guard 

ARNOLD, M. DEAN 

Cross Country, Naturalists Club, Track 




D. ALLGOOD 



E. ALLSEITZ 




J ALLSEITZ 



S. ARDT 




ARNOLD, SUZANNE 

ARTHUR DANA 

French Club, Naturalists Club, History Club, 

Office Messenger, Yearbook 

BADER, CYNTHIA 

Biology Assistant, Powderpuff football 

BAKER, ROBERT 

BANSBACH, ELIZABETH 




S. ARNOLD 



D. ARTHUR 



C. BADER 



R. BAKER 



E BANSBACH 




BARCUS, DeANN 

Naturalists Club, Prom Comm., Office Mes- 
senger, Float Comm., Powderpuff Football, 
Matmaids 

BARKDULL, SHELLEY 

BARNARD, DAVID 

Bowling League, Naturalists Club, Key Club 

Senior Class President 

BATEMAN, BETTYE 
BATES, PEGGY 




D BARCUS 



S. BARKDULL 



D. BARNARD 



B. BATEMAN 




D. BATEY 

128/Seniors 



V BAXTER 



T. BEECHLER 



BATEY, DEBRA 

Marching Band, Naturalists Club, Office 
Messenger, Pep Band, National Honor So- 
ciety, Symphonic Wind Ensemble 

BAXTER, VINCENT 
Basketball, PE Assistant 

BEECHLER, THOMAS 

Latin Club, Office Messenger, Key Club 

BISHOP, BRIAN 

BLACKBURN, KENNETH 




B. BISHOP 



K. BLACKBURN 




S. BUKESLEE 



F. BLAYDOE 



W. BOEHMER 




B. BOWMAN N 



A. BOYD 



K. BOYER 




L BRIDGEFORTH 



D BRIGHT 



M BRISTOW 




D. BROWN 



T. BROWNE 



R. BULTMAN 




A. BURRUS 



J. BUTTS 



R. BYRO 




BLAKESLEE, STEVEN 

Nat. Club 10, History Club 10, Radio Club 9 

BLAYDOE, FAITH 

Pats on Parade 12, Mat Maid 10, 11, Pow- 

derpuff 12 

BOEHMER, WILLIAM 
ROTC Drill Team 11, 12 Comm., Sci. Sem. 
12, Sci. Asst. 9-12, Key Club 9,10, ROTC 
Color Guard 9,10,11, Comm. Natl. Honor 
Soc. 11, 12 

BONEBRAKE, DENNIS 

BOWLES, PATRICIA 

Nat. Club 10, 11, Stage Crew 11, 12, Bio. 

Asst. 11 Powderpuff 12 



BOWMAN, BILLY 

BOYD, AARON 
Student Council 9-12 

BOYER, KATHY 

BRADSHAW, ROGER 

BREAZIEL, MARY 



P. CARR 



D. CARUTHERS 



BRIDGEFORTH, LILLTTA 

BRIGHT, DAVID 

BRISTOW, MARK 

BRONSTRUP, KATHY 
Yearbook 10, Powderpuff 12 

BROOKS, TERESA 

Music Club 10, 12, Span. Club 10 



BROWN, DELORES 

BROWNE, THOMAS 

Football 9,11, Math Club 9, Nat. Club 10, 
Newspaper 9-12, Quill and Scroll 11,12 V. 
Pres., Stud. Coun. 10-12, Ed. Newspaper, 
Ger. Club 9-12 

BULTMAN, ROBERT 

BURKES, TINA 

Pats of Parade 9-11, Nurse Asst. 9-11, Ma- 
jorette 11,12 

BURNS, JOSEPH 

Drama 11,12, Pats on Par. 11,12, Octet 

11,12, Choir 11,12, Key Club 11 



BURRUS, ANITA 

BUTTS, JOE 

BYRD, ROBIN L. 

Orchestra 9,10, Patriette 10, Natl. Germ. 

Awd. 9, Eng. Dept. Awd. 11 

BUTTRUM, ROBIN 

Bowling 10,11, Nat. Club 10,11, Stud. Coun. 

12. 

CARDER, SCOTT 

Basketball 9,10, Cheerleader 12, Nat. Club 
9-12, Football 9-12, Lettermans Club 11,12, 
Stud. Coun. 9-12 V. Pres., Natl. Honor Soc. 
11,12, Baseball 9-12. 

CARR, PAUL 
Wrestling 9,10 

CARUTHERS, DANIEL 



CASEY, DIANE 

Basketball 9-12, Nat. Club 9-12, Volleyball 

9-12 Sci. and Art Asst. 12 Fest. of Arts 11 

CECIL, NOEL 

Drama 10-12, March. Band 9-12, Music 
Club 10-12, Orchestra 10-12, Pats on Par. 
10-12, Pep Band 10-12 Soccer 9, Who's 
Who in Mus 

CHALUPA, BARBARA E. 

French Club 9,10, Nat. Club 10, Eng. Asst. 

11,12 




D BONEBRAKE 



P BOWLES 




T. BURKES 



J. BURNS 




R. BUTTRUM 




N. CECIL 



B. CHALUPA 

Seniors/129 




M. CHEATHAM 



P.CHILCOTE 



D. CHRISTIAN 




K. CLARK 



S. CLARK 



T. CLEMENTS 




T. CONLEY 



P. CONNER 



L. COX 




R. CROCKETT 



P. CROMWELL 



J. CROSS 




C. DARLING 



R. DAVENPORT 



B. DAVIS 




F. DAY 

130/Seniors 



K DEER 



R. DENNEY 



CHEATHAM, MICHAEL J. 
Newspaper 10-12, Ed., Pats on Parade 10- 
12, ROTC 9-12 Batt. Comm., Sci. Seminar 
10-12, Speech Team 10-12, Stud. Coun. 9- 
12 Pres., Yearbook 12, Voice of Democracy, 
Key Club 11 

CHILCOTE, PATRICIA 

Nat. Club 10, Powderpuff Footb., German 

Awd. 9,11, German Club 9-11 

CHRISTIAN, DEBBIE 

French Club 9, Nat. Club 10 IMC Assist. 11, 
Off. Mess. 12, DECA 12, Home Ec. Assist. 
11, Matmaid 9 

CHURCH, MARIE 

Nat. Club 10, Quill and Scroll 11,12, Year- 
book 9-12 Ed., ICT Sec. and Treas. 

CLARDY, THEOPOLIS 

CLARK, KEVIN W. 

Football 9,10, Lettermans Club 10, Wres- 
tling 9-11, Baseball 9 

CLARK, SUSAN 

CLEMENTS, THOMAS 

COLEMAN, DAPHNE 

COLLINS, MARCUS 



CONLEY, TIMOTHY 

CONNER, PATRICK 
Baseball-Stud. Mgr. 9 

COX, LESIA 

CRAWLEY, TAMARA 

Mar. Band 9-12, Pep band 9-12, Sci. Sem. 
10,12, Z-Club 11,12 Ger. Club 9-12, A 
Band 9-12 

CRITTENDEN, BRENDA 
CROCKETT, RENEE 

CROMWELL, PATRICIA A. 
IMC 9, Newsp. 9-12, Off. Mess. 12, Photo. 
Club 11, Quill and Scroll 11, Stud. Coun. 
9,10, Just Us 9-12, Powderpuff 12, Nat. 
Honor Soc, Journ. Exec. Comm. 

CROSS, JAMES 

Ath. Mgr. 11, Bowling 12, Football 10-12, 

Pep Band 12, Baseball 9, Cone. Band 

9,11,12 

CROUCH, DANIEL 

Football 9-12, Lettermans Club 12, Nat. 
Club 10,12, Newsp. 12 Lab. Assist. 11,12, 
Key Club 11,12 Pres., Mar. Co. Press Day 
Ed. Cont. 1st pi 

DALTON, GREG 

Nat. Club 9-12, Sci. Sem. 10-12, Wrest. 

10,11, Sci. Assist. 11,12, Key Club 11 



DARLING, COLETTE 

Drama 11,12, French Club 9,10 Music Club 

10-12, Off. Mess. 9,10, Pats on Parade 

11,12. 

DAVENPORT, ROBERT 

DAVIS, BECKEY 

DAVIS, ELAINE 

DAVIS, PHILLIP 



DAY, FRANCES 

DEER, KELLY 

Nat. Club 9-12, Off. Mess 9, Pep Band 11, 
Span. Club 9, Powder puff football, Fest. of 
Arts 11 

DENNEY, RANDALL 

DENNIS, KAREN 

DEVORE, JOSEPH H. Ill 

Lettermans Club 11,12, Stud. Coun. 9-11, 

Powderpuff Cheer. Baseball 9-12 







M. CHURCH 




D. COLEMAN 



M. COLLINS 




T. CRAWLEY 



B. CRITTEDEN 




D. CROUCH 



G. DALTON 







E. DAVIS 



P. DAVIS 




K. DENNIS 



J DEVORE 







R, DITOMMASO 



D DODD 




R DORSEY 



T. DOWNTON 




J EDWARDS 



S. ELDRIDGE 




S. EMRICK 



S ENGELKING 



J. ENOCHS 




K. FAIRLEY 



B. FANNING 



DILLON, ARVIL 

DITOMMASO, RICKY 

DODD, DAPHNE 

Music Club 10, Off. Mess. 11,12, Stud. 

Coun. 9 

DORMAN, GARY 11 

Drama 10,11, Nat. Club 10,12 Pats on Pa- 
rade 9-11, Sci. Sem. 9-12, Stud. Coun 
10,11 Chair Sci. Assist. 11,12, Key Club 10 
Dial, and Dess. 12, Feast and Follies 9,10 

DORSEY, ROBIN MARIE 

Prom. Comm. 12, Off. Mess. 9-11, Pow- 

derpuff Foot. 12, Majorettes 11 

DORSEY, RUSSELL 

DOWNTON, TAMARA 
Nat. Club 9-12, Drill Team 11,12, Prom 
Comm. 12, March Band 11,12, Pats on Pa- 
rade 12 DECA Pres. 12, Math Assist. 10 
Homecoming Queen, Mat Maids 9 

DUNLOP, MARCUS 

Basketball 9-12, Stage Crew 9, Stud. Coun. 

10, Track 9,11,12 Math Assist. 9, ICT Rel. 
Class Pres., Stud. Leadership Awd. 9, Perf. 
Att. Awd. 10 

DUVALL, MELVIN JR. 

DYE, MICHAEL 

Drama 11,12, News 11,12, Pats on Parade 
11,12, Ger. Club 10-12, Key Club 11,12 
Wargames Club 10,11, Volleybl Linesman 
12, Cone. Choir 12, AWM 12 

DYER, JENNY 

EDWARDS, JACK 

Basketb. 9, Nat. Club 10,11, Off. Mess. 

10,11, PE Assist 12 Stud, Coun. 9-12, SC 

Off. 11,12, Baseb 9 Var. 11,12, Human Rel 

9-12, Powderpuff Cheer. 12 

ELDRIDGE, SUSAN 

ELLISON, CYNTHIA 

EMPERLY, CANDANCE 

Nat. Club 11, Off. Mess 9,10 Stage Crew 

11, Powderpuff Foot 

EMRICK, SANDRA E. 
Nat. Club 10, Prom. Comm. 12 Off. Mess 
9,10, Stud. Coun 12, Yearbook 12, Mat 
Maids 9,10,11 

ENGELKING, SUSAN 

Nat. Club 9-11, Prom Comm. 12, Music Club 
9,10, Off. Mess. 9,10, Sci. Sem. 11, Span. 
Club 9, Z Club 10-12, Float Comm. 11,12, 
Powderpuff Foot. 12, Mat Maids Pres., Nat. 
Honor Soc. Pres. 

ENOCHS, JOHN 

EVERETT, BRUCE 

Cheerleader 11, Nat. Club 10-12, Let- 
termans Club 10-12 Pats on Parade 9, 
Stud. Coun. 9,10, Tennis 9-12, Powder. 
Football Cheer., Pres. Lettermans Club 12 

FAIR, CAROLYN 

Speech Team 9,10, Stud. Coun. 9-11, Patri- 

ettes 10,11, Homecoming Queen Court 

FAIRLEY, KEITH 

Fren. Club 9,10, Nat. Club 10-12, Speech 
Team 10, Powder puff Cheer. Key Club Tres 
10-12, Soccer Club 10-11 

FANNING, BRIAN 

FARLEY, DEBORAH 

FERREE, LORI 

Nat. Club 10-12, Stage Crew 11 Stud. Coun 
9,10, Powderpuff Footb. 12, Fest. of Arts, 
Cheer blk. 9, Patriettes 10,11 

FISCHER, LINDA 

FISHER, JOHN C. 

Golf 9-12, Lettermans Club 10-12, Math 
Club 9,10, Nat. Club 10,11, Sci. Sem. 10-12, 
Stud. Coun. 9,10 

FLEMING, LANCE 
FONTANA, DEBRA 




G. DORMAN II 




M DUVALL JR 




C. ELLISON 



C EMPERLY 




B EVERETT 



C. FAIR 




L FERREE 



L. FISCHER 




J. FISCHER 



L. FLEMING 



D. FONTANA 












D. FORBIS 




S. FORD 



WSm l 


' -■!:.■;';:.*, 




7 


u 


1 



FORBIS, DARLA 

Drama 10-12, Prom. Comm. 12 Nat. Thes. 
Soc. 12, Nat. Club 9-12, Pats on Parade 11, 
PE Assist. 11, Spelunking 10, Stud. Coun. 
10-12, Z Club 11,12, Patriot Personality 

FORD, JANICE 

Nat. Club 10, Off. Mess. 10,11 Powder puff 

12 

FORD, STEVE 

Chess 9, Nat. Club 9-12, Football 9-11 

FOX, JEFF 

Drama, Nat. Thes. Soc, Pats on Parade, 

Radio Club, Stage Crew 

FRYE, SANDRA 
GARVEY, DEBRA 

GENTRY, WESLEY 

Nat. Club 9-12, Lettermans Club 11,12, 
Stud. Coun. 12, Tennis 11-Cap. 12, Pow- 
derpuff Cheer 12, Ger. Club 9-12 

GIBBONS, BRIAN K. 

Central H.S.-Evansville 9 Bowling 10, 11, 
Drama 9, Nat. Club 10-12, Golf 10,11, 
March. Band 10, Pats on Parade 10, Pep 
Band 10-12 

GILLARD, FRANK 

GILLARD, RUTH 




D. GARVEY 



W. GENTRY 



B. GIBBONS 



F. GILLARD 



R. GILLARD 




D GLOYE 



K 1 



D. GOLDMAN 




GLOYE, DAVID 

GOFF, DENISE 

GOLDMAN, DIANE 

Nat. Club 10-12, Prom. Comm. 12, Newspa- 
per 9-12, Off. Mess. 9-11, Quill and Scroll 
11,12, Stud. Coun. 11, Powderpuff 12, Sr. 
Class Treas., Mang. Ed. News. 12, Feat. Ed. 
11, Mat Maids 9-11 Co-Cap. 

GORDON, TONY 

GOSNELL, JEFFREY 

Basketball 9, Football 9, Baseball 10-12, 

Powderpuff Cheer. 



GRAAT, JAMES 

Chess 9, Marching Band 10-12, Pep Band 
9-12, Stud. Coun. 11, Sci. Sem. 10, Sci. As- 
sist. 11, Cone. Band 10-12 

GRANT, JOEL, SCOTT 
Bowling 10, Nat. Club 10-12 

GRANT, KAREN 

Nat. Club 11, Powderpuff 12 

GREENE, TONYA 

GRIEEIN, GEORGE 




T. GORDON 



J. GOSNELL 




J. GRAAT 



K. GRANT 




W. GRIFFIN 



J. HAMMOND 

132/Seniors 



J. GRUNNER 



S. HAGG 




S. HANSEN 



GRIFFIN, WILBUR 

GRUNER, JAMES 

HAAG, SHARON 

HALL, DONALD 

HAMILTON, KATHERINE SHELLY 
Latin Club 10-12, Sci. Sem. 10,12, Eng. As- 
sist. 12, Lat. Awd. 10,11 



HAMMOND, JAMES H. 
Nat. Club 9-12, PE Assist. 11,12, Spelunking 
9,10, Wrestling 9, Soccer 9,12, Powderpuff 
Cheer 12 

HAND, TIM 

HANSEN, SHERRI 

Z Club 9-12, Powderpuff 12, Ger. Club 9-12 

HARLAN, SAM 

HARRIS, ANNETTE 




S. HARLAN 







A. HARVEY 



T. HAYDEN 




HARVEY, ANN 

HARDEN, MARION 

Chess 9, Nat. Club 10, Football 9,10, Pats 

on Parade 12, Spelunking 11, Stage Crew 

11 

HAYDEN, THOMAS 

Marching Band 9-12, Nat. Club 9-12, Pep 
Band 9-12, Sci. Sem. 10-12, Span. Club 9, 
Cone. Band 9-12, Drum Major 11,12 

HAYDEN, TORY 

Football 9, March. Band 11,12, Pats on Pa- 
rade 12, Pep Band 9-12, Track 11,12 

HAYDOCK, DENICE 

March. Band 11, Off. Mess. 11,12, ROTC 

Drill Team 10 

HEINES, DIANE 
Prom. Comm. 12 

HELTON, RONDA 

Prom. Comm. 12, Off. Mess. 11, Yearbook 

12, Prom. Queen 

HICKS, CHRISTINE 

Off. Mess. 9,10 Powderpuff 12 

HIDALGO, SHARON 

IMC Club 12, Powderpuff 12, Homecoming 

Cand. 

HIGNITE, GINA 




D HAYDOCK 




D. HEINES 



R. HELTON 



C. HICKS 



S. HIDALGO 



G. HIGNITE 




HIGNITE, TINA 
HILL, CYNDY 



HOGUE, BETTY 
Off. Mess. 9-11 



HOLDEN, BARBARA 



HOLMAN, GREG 

Basketball 9-12, Football 11,12, Lettermans 

Club 10-12 




T. HIGNITE 



C. HILL 



B. HOGUE 



G HOLMAN 




HOOVER, ANGELA 

HOPE, JACQUELINE 

HOUGLAND, PATRICIA 
Nat. Club 10, Off. Mess. 10,11, Intra. Volley- 
ball 9 

HOUK, RICHARD 

HOWARD, CURTIS 




A. HOOVER 



P HOUGLAND 



C HOWARD 




HOWE, ELISA 

Nat. Club 11,12, Eng. Assist. 10-12 

HOY, EDWIN 

Sci. Assist. 11,12, Ger. Club 10-12 

HUDSON, KIM 

HULETT, MARK 

Bowling 9,10, Nat. Club 10,11, Sci. Sem. 10, 

Spelunking 9-11 Sec. 10, Pres. 11 

HUNT, JILL 

Nat. Club 9-12, Drill Team 11,12, March. 
Band 11,12, Music Club 9,10, Off. Mess. 11, 
DECA 12, Float Comm. 11,12, Powderpuff 
12, Patriettes 11,12 




E. HOY 



M. HULETT 



J HUNT 




D. HUPP 



M. HURD 



T. HURD 



HUPP, DIANE 

Nat. Club 10-12, Off. Mess. 10-12, Pow- 
derpuff 12 

HURD, MIKE 

HURD, TERESA M. 
Prom. Comm. 12 

HYDE, DEBRA 

IN LOW, ERIN 




D. HYDE 



E INLOW 

Seniors/133 




IRVINE, PERRY 

Nat. Club 11,12, Sci. Assist. 11,12 

IRWIN, ROBEN 

JACKSON, CARLA 

Cheerleader 9, Prom. Comm. 11, Off. Mess. 
9-11, PE Assist. 10,11, Yearbook 10,11, 
Powderpuff 12, Homecoming Cand. 

JACKSON, JANICE 

JACKSON, ROBERT 




P. IRVINE 



R IRWIN 



C. JACKSON 




C. JENKINS 



J. JENKINS 




D. JOHNSON 



J. JOHNSON 



L JOHNSON 




J. JOYCE 



J. KANE 



M. KARKINS 




E. KEMNITZ 



D. KEMP 



K. KENNEDY 




M. KOUNS 



JACOB, PAM 

Nat. Club 10, Off. Mess. 9,10, Powderpuff 

12 

JENKINS, CHARLES 

Lettermans Club 10-12, Newspaper 10-12, 
Quill and Scroll 11,12, Stud. Coun. 10, 
Wrestling 9-12 Co-Cap. 12, ROTC Officer 

JENKINS, JAMES 

JENT, TAMMY 

Nat. Club 11,12, History Club 9-10, Latin 
Club 9,10, Off. Mess. 10-12, Yearbook 
11,12, Powderpuff 12 

JOHNSON, DENNIS A. 
Basketball 10, Cheerleader 12, Nat. Club 
10-12, Lettermans Club 12, PE Assist. 11, 
Stud. Coun. 12, Powderpuff Cheerleader 12, 
Baseball 9-12, NCTE Honor 



JOHNSON, DIANA 
Nat. Club 9 

JOHNSON, JOY 

JOHNSON, LAMONT 

JONES, ISAAC 

JONES, KEVIN 

JOYCE, JAMES 

KANE, JOAN 

Basketball 9-12 Pres. Latin Club 9-12, 
Newspaper 9-12, Quill and Scroll, Stud. 
Coun. 9-12, Tennis 9-12, Z Club 10-12, 
Powderpuff 12, NCTE Awd., Nat. Honor Soc. 
11,12, Dial, and Dess. 12 

KARKLINS, MARIS 

Bowling 10,11, Football 9-11, Lettermans 
Club 11, March. Band 9, Math Club 9-10, 
Pep Band 9-11, Spelunking 9, Wrestling 9, 
Ger. Club 9,10, Powderpuff Cheer 12 

KEAFFABER, ROBERT 
Lettermans Club 11,12, Nat. Club 10,11, 
Sci. Sem. 10-12, Stud. Coun. 10, Tennis 
11,12, Aerospace 10-11 

KEITH, KAREN 

Art Club 10, Nat. Club 10, March. Band 9, 

Off. Mess. 9, DECA, Powderpuff 12 

KEMNITZ, ELIZABETH 

KEMP, DAVID 

KENNEDY, KIM 

KENNEDY, LAURA 

Art Club 11, Nat. Club 10, Photo. Club 12, 

Powderpuff 12, Art Awd. 9 

KIMMEL, KRIS 

KIPER, LINDA 

Float Comm. 11,12, Ger. Club 12, Pow- 
derpuff 12 

KOUNS, MICHAEL 

LA CROIX, PEGGY 

Drama 10, Nat. Club 10-2, March. Band 

9,10, Pats on Parade 10, Pep Band 9,10, 

Sci. Sem. 10-12, Span. Club 9, Z Club 10- 

12, Powderpuff 12, Girls State, Nat. Club 

Sec. 

LAND, ROSE ELAINE 

Nat. Club 9-12, Prom. Comm. 12, Off. Mess. 
11, Pats on Parade 10, PE Assist. 11, Sci. 
Sem. 10, Stud. Coun. 11, Z Club 9-12, 
DECA 12, Powderpuff 12, Ger. Club 9, Sec. 
10, Voice of Demo. 2nd, Mat Maids 9,10, 
Nat. Honor Soc. 11,12, Patriettes 11 

LANDES, ANN 

Nat. Club 10-12, Off. Mess 10, Stud. Counc. 
10-12, SC V. Pres. 12, Z Club ll.Treas. 12, 
Sci. Assist. 11, Homecoming Cand., Girls' 
State, Nat. Honor Soc. 11,12, Human Rel. 
Comm. 9-12 



J. JACKSON 



R. JACKSON 




JONES 



K. JONES 




R. KEAFFABER 



K. KEITH 




L KENNEDY 





MMHMHHMi 



D. MALANDER 




LARRISON, ROXANNE 

Ger. Club 11,12, Eng. Assist. 9-11, Just Us 

10,11, Powderpuff 12 

LAW, PAULETTE 

Prom. Comm. 12, Newspaper 12, Yearbook 
12, Eng. Asst. 11,12, Powderpuff 12, Phys- 
ics Asst. 12 

LEPSCUM, CHERYL 

LESLIE, RICKEY 

Drama, 10-12, Off. Mess. 12, Pats on Pa- 
rade 9-12, Float Comm. 12, Choir 11,12, 
Key Club 10-12, Sons of Liberty 9-12, Feast 
'n Follies 9-12, Who's Who in Music 

LIGON, CHERYL 

LrTSEY, LAURA 

Basketball 10, Off. Mess. 10, Pep Band 9, 

Track 9, Volleyball 10 Cap., Pep Club 9-12, 

Powderpuff 12, Ger. Club 11-12, B.C. Club 

9,10 

LrTSEY, LINDA 

Basketball 9,10, Lettermans Club 10, News- 
paper 9,10, Pep Band 9,10, Track 9, Volley- 
ball 9, Z Club 11,12, Ger. Club 11,12, V. 
Pres., Nat. Honor Soc, Cone. Band 9-10 

,0NG, TH0MA 
i CrTeerTeaTJer 10,11, Off. Mess. 9, Stud. Coun. 



LYNCH, LARRY 

MAJOR, RODERICK 
Student Council 10,11 

MALANDER, DAVID 

MALONE, SHEILA 

MANSFIELD, LISA 

Drama 11,12, French Club 10, Nat. Thes. 
Soc. 11,12, Off. Mess. 11, Pats on Parade 
9-11, Span. Club 9, Speech Team 10, Cam- 
pus Life 9,10 

MARLEY, KENT 

Nat. Club 10,11, Newspaper 11, Sci. Sem. 

12, Ger. Club 10-12, Wargaming Club Pres. 

12 

MARTENS, TOM 
Nat. Honor Soc. 

MARTIN, CONNIE 

MARTIN, KATHLEEN 

Prom. Comm. 12, Nat. Club 11, Off. Mess. 
12, Sci. Sem. 11, Stage Crew 12, Yearbook 
11,12, Asst. Sr. Ed., Turnabout 11,12 

MATHESON, DEBBIE 

MATLOCK, MARY 
Powderpuff 12 




C. LIGON 







S. LUTOCKA 



MANSFIELD 



L. LYNCH 




K MARLEY 




T. MARTENS 



C. MARTIN 



K. MARTIN 



D. MATHESON 



M MATLOCK 




MATTINGLY, MICHELE 
Athl. Mgr. 10, Nat. Club 10-12, March. 
Band 9,10, Off. Mess. 9, Pats on Par. 10-12, 
Pep Band 10, Span. Club 11, Volleyball 9,10, 
Z Club 10-12, Powderpuff 12, Nat. Honor 
Soc. 11,12, Marshallaires 11,12, Liberty 
Belles 10 

maxey, tonia 
Mccarty, michael 

Nat. Club 9-12, Sci. Sem. 10-12, Track 12, 
Sci. Asst. 10-12, Soccer 12 

McCLURE, YVONNE 

McCOY, TIM 



^m « 


F~3* 1f 1 










,{ 


IT 


J 



M. MATTINGLY 



T. MAXEY 



M. McCARTY 



Y, McCLURE 




/ i 

d. Mcdonald p. Mcdowell 



p. Mcdowell 



Mcdonald, david 

Football 10, Pats on Par. 12 



Mcdowell, Patrick 



Mcdowell, patsy 

McINTYRE, LINDA 

Mckinley, mark 

Basketball 9,10, Nat. Club 10, PE Asst. 11, 
Sci. Sem. 10, Stud. Coun. 9-12 SC Off. 12, 
Baseball 10, Acad Cong. 9 




L. McINTYRE 



M. McKINLEY 

Seniors/135 




G. McWILLIAMS 



R MILLER 



T MEALS 




G MILLS 



K. MINER 




McWILLIAMS, GEORGE 

MEALS, TERESA 

MEYER, DEBRA 

MICHAEL, TONI 

History Club 10, Latin Club 9 

MILLER, LEEANN 

Cheerleader 9-12, Nat. Club 9-12, Prom. 

Comm. Ch. 12, Off. Mess. 12, Stud. Coun. 

9,10, Z Club 11,12, Float Comm. 9-12, Pow- 

derpuff 12, Homecoming Cand., Jamboree 

Queen 



MILLER, ROXANNE 
Drill Team 9-11, Comm., Eng. Asst. 11, 
Powderpuff 12, Fest. of Arts 10, Cheer 
Block 9, Gov. and Econ. Rep. 



MILLS, GREGORY 
Spelunking 10,11, Stage Crew 



MINER, KEITH 



MITCHELL, WILLIAM G.N. 
Lettermans Club 11,12, ROTC Drill Team 
10-12 Cap., Stud. Coun. 11, Tennis 9,10, 
Chem. Asst. 11, Patriot Personality 

M0G0LL0N, MARGARITA 



MONTGOMERY, MARGUERITE 

MONTGOMERY, PATRICIA 
Athl. Mgr. 9-11, Nat. Club 9-12, Prom. 
Comm. 12, Off. Mess. 9-12, Tennis 9-12, 
Volleyball 9-12, Z Club 9-12 Treas. 11, V. 
Pres. 12, Nat. Honor Soc. 11-12 V. Pres. 

MOORE, MAZELL 

MOORE, PHILLIP P. 

Bowling 10,11, Nat. Club 10-12, Off. Mess. 

12, Stage Crew, Zoo. Asst. 12 

MORALES, MICHELLE 
Nat. Club 10-12 




T. MICtlAEL 



B. MITCHELL 



L. MILLER 




M. MOGOLLON 




M MONTGOMERY 



P. MONTGOMERY 



P. MOORE 



M MORALES 



CONGRATULATIONS 
Class of 78 

Your graduation from high school marks an important 
milestone in your lives — one we trust will be the first 
of many. 

As you leave to accept new challenges, we know the 
foundation you have built over the past four years will 
serve you well. 

Our warmest congratulations and best wishes to each 
of you. 



ItCJl 



An equal opporti 



136/Seniors 




MORRIS, JOHN D. 

Basketball 9, Nat. Club 11, Football 9 

MORRISON, RAYMON 

NAPPER, SUZANNE 

Basketball 9-12 Cap., Nat Club 10,12, Off 
Mess. 11,12, PE Asst. 11, Track 9,10, Vol- 
leyball 9-12 Cap. Sci. Asst 12 

NEEB, LARRY 

NEER, JEFF 

Drama 11,12, Nat. Club 10-12, Football 
9,10, Nat. Thes. Soc. 12, Stage Crew 11,12, 
Stud. Coun. 12, Zoo Asst. 11,12 




J. MORRIS 



R. MORRISON 



S. NAPPER 



L. NEEB 



J. NEER 




NEWELL, DAVID 
Wrestling 10 

NICHOLSON, PAMELA 

French Club 9,10, History 10, Off. Mess. 9, 

Pats on Parade 11, Campus Life 10,11 

NOE, ROBERT 

Nat. Club 10-12, PE Asst. 11,12, Sci. Sem. 

10-12, Sci. Asst 9-12, Key Club 11 

NOSTRAND, GERALD 

NOVOTNY, KEN 

Nat. Club 10-12, Float Comm. 10-12, Soc- 
cer Club 9-12, Ger. Club 10, Aerospace 10- 
12 



OUTLAW, JOYCE 

OWENS, DAVID 

PARKS, LISA 

PARROT, DANIEL 

PARTRIDGE, ELAINE 

Nat. Club 10, Z Club 10-12, Natl. Honor 

Soc. 11-12, Ger Club 9-11 



PATE, ELAINE 

Basketball 10, Tennis 11, Volleyball 11,12 

PAYNE, PAUL 

PERRY, ANDREA 

PHELPS, LAVELLA 

PHILLIPS, LINDA 




G NOSTRAND 



D. PARROT 



K NOVONTNY 




E PATRIDGE 




E. PATE 



L PHELPS 



L PHILLIPS 




D. PHIPPS 



M. POLLARD 




M. POMPEY 




PHIPPS, DEBRA 
POLLARD, MIKE 
POMPEY, McKENDALL 
PORTWOOD, DAVID 
POSLEY, BELINDA 



PRIDE, HAROLD 

Chess Club 9-11, Exer. in Know. 11,12, Nat 
Club 10, Quiz Team 11,12, Sci. Sem. 12, Key 
Club 10-12, Ger. Club 11,12, Chess 10,11, 
Natl. Honor Soc. 11,12 

RAMER, LEIGH ELLEN 
Athl. Mgr. 9, Nat. Club 9, March. Band 
9,10, Photo. Club 12, Track 9-12, Natl. 
Honor Soc, Ger. Club 

REED, DOUGLAS 

Basketball 11,12, Football 9, Golf 9-12 Cap., 
Speech Team 10,11, Tennis 10-12 Cap., 
DECA 12 Treas., Voice of Demo. -2nd 

ROBBINS, KEVIN 

ROBINSON, DIANNA DEAN 
Off. Mess 9-12 




D. PORTWOOD 




K, ROBBINS 



D. ROBINSON 

Seniors/137 





-~ - 

<€3lra 




E. ROBINSON 



A. ROOT 



P RYAN 



w * 


in 


1<A 


>J 


Klft 




■l// 


"'•" i / 



C. SCOTT 

138/Seniors 



S ROBINSON 



D. ROCHFORD 




S. ROUTON 




R. SANDEFUR 



M. SAUSSER 




L SCOTT 



S. SEARS 



ROBINSON, EMORY 

Drama 11,12, Football 9-12, Lettermans 
Club 11,12, Patriots on Parade 10-12, 
Wrestling 9-11, Choir 11,12, Sons of Liberty 
10-12, State music Contest first place 

ROBINSON, SAM 

Football 9-11, Lettermans Club 10, Track 

11 

RICHFORD, DAVID 
Math Club 9,10 

ROGERS, CAROL 

ROGERS, ELIZABETH 

Naturalist Club 9, Music Club 9-11, Student 

Council 10, Powderpuff Football, Music 

Award 

ROOT, ARCHIE 

Naturalist Club 10-12, Soccer Team 9-12 

ROSE, MARSHA 

ROUTON, SONDRA 

ROWE, BRADLEY 

Wrestling 9,10, Key Club 11,12, officer, Ger- 
man Club 9-12, Concert Band 9,10,12, Key 
Club 9-12 

RUSSELL, KEVIN 

Golf team 9-12, Lettermans Club 11,12, 

Student Council 11, Wrestling 9 

RYAN, PAMELA 

Naturalists Club 12, Biology Assistant 11,12, 

Botany Club 11,12 

SANDEFUR, ROBERT 

Football 9, ROTC Drill Team 11,12 

SAUSSER, MARK 

Cross Country 11,12, Quiz Team 12, Track 

11,12, Yearbook 10-12 

SCHEOBELHUT, DAVID 

SCHLUGE, DAN 

Cheerleader 12, Nat. Club 9-12 V. Pres., 
Football 9-12, Lett. Club 11,12, PE Asst. 
11,12, Stud. Coun. 11, Wrestling 9-12, 
Baseball 9-12, All-City Football 

SCOTT, CATHY 

March. Band 9-12, Nat. Club 10-12, Pep 
Band 9-12, Z Club 10-12, Ger. Club 9-12, 
Natl. Honor Soc. 11,12, Sci. As. 

SCOTT, USA 

SEARS, SCHERRIE 

Track 12, Off. Mess. 10,11, Powderpuff 

Skating Club 12. 

SELLS, ROGER 

Nat. Club 10, Football 9, PE Asst. Wrestling 

9 

SEXTON, JANICE 

Nat. Club 10-12, Stud. Coun. 9, Eng. Asst. 

11, Just Us 12, Fest. of Arts 9, Powderpuff 

12, Team 10, Powderpuff Football 12 




C. RODGERS 



E. ROGERS 




K. RUSSELL 




D. SCHEIBELHUT 



D. SCHLUGE 




J. SEXTON 




C. SHARKEY 



P. SHEEHAM 



S. SHEPARO 




R. SHRONTZ 



J. SLUSS 



SHAFER, REGGIE 
Basketball 9,11 

SHARKEY, CINDI 

Powderpuff Football 12, Speech Team 10 

SHEEHAN, PATRICK 

Naturalists Club 10-12, Key Club 11,12, 

Science Assistant 

SHEPARD, STEVE 

Cheerleader 11,12, Naturalists Club 10-12, 
Football 9, Lettermans Club 9-12, Office 
Messenger 9, P.E. Assistant 11,12, Student 
Council 10, Wrestling, Capt. 9-12, Pow- 
derpuff football cheerleader 

SHEPHERD, JULIE 

Naturalists Club 9,10,11, Newspaper 9-12, 
Stage Crew 10, Student Council 9-11, Year- 
book 9-12, Powderpuff Football, German 
Club, English Club, Matmaids 9, Patriettes 
10,11 

SHOCKENEY, DIANE 

SHRONTZ, RITA ANNE 
Naturalists Club 10-12, Prom Comm. 23, 
Student Council 9-12, Science Assistant 
10,11, Float Comm , Matmaids, Treas. 9-11, 
German Club 9 

SHULL, DORIS 

Naturalists Club 10,11, IMC Club 9,10,12, 

Science Assistant 11, German Club 9-11 

SLUSS, JAY 

SMITH, ARTHUR 




J SHEPHERD 



D. SHOCKENEY 




A. SMITH 



El SMITH 




SMITH, ELISABETH 

SMITH, HAROLD 

Naturalists Club 10,11, P.E. Assistant, Biol- 
ogy Assistant 12 

SMITH, KAREN 

Naturalists Club 10-12, Prom. Comm. 12, 
Office Messenger 9,10, Z Club 10-12, Float 
Comm. 11,12, Powderpuff Football, Mat- 
maids 10,11, National Honor Society 11,12, 
German Club 9,10 

SMITH, KEVIN 

Naturalists Club 10, Baseball 9 




K. SMITH 



K. SMITH 




SMITH, LEONARD W. 

ROTC Drill Team 9,10, Student Council 

10,11 

SMITH, PARNELL 

SMITH, WARREN 

SOUTHGATE, MARY 

SPEIGHTS, EDITH 

SPIERS, LAURA 

Drama 10-12, French Club 9, History Club 
9, National Thespian Society 11,12, Office 
Messenger 10-12, Patriots on Parade 10- 
12, Student Council 10,11 



L. SMITH 




* v - * 



W. SMITH 



M. SOUTHGATE 



E. SPEIGHTS 




S. STEMSHORN 



S STERRETT 



K. STEWART 



SPRINGER, KAREN 
Patriots on Parade 12 

STARK, BONNIE 

Drama 11,12, French Club 9, National Thes- 
pian Society 12, Patriots on Parade 9,11,12, 
Speech Team, Officer 10-12, Track 9, 
Science Assistant 10, Powderpuff Football, 
National Forensics League, Folk Dance Club 
10 

STARK, CHRIS 

Art Club 10, Bowling League 10-12 Chess 

Club 10,11 

STARKS, SHERI 

Naturalists Club 10, Girls' Drill Team, Track 

10-12 

STEELE, RICKY 



STEENBERGER, MARK 

STEMSHORN, STEVE 

STERRETT, SCOTT 

Basketball 9, Float Comm. 9, Baseball 9,10 



STEWART, KATHY 

STITT, ROGER 

Naturalists Club 10-12, Science Seminar 

11,12, Biology Assistant 11,12, Key Club 

11,12 



L SPIRES 



K SPRINGER 




R STEELE 



M STEENBERGER 




R. STITT 



R SHAFER 

Seniors/139 



DISTINCTIVE 
PHOTOGRAPHY 




Wedding Photography 
Senior Photos 




D. STOCKHOFF 



S STOE 



L. STUCKER 




STOCKHOFF, DONALD 

French Club 11, Naturalists Club 10-12, 

Baseball 11,12 

STOE, SANDY 

STUCKER, LYNDA 

French Club 9, Naturalists Club 10-12, 
Prom. Comm. 12, Quill and Scroll 11,12, 
Student Council 9-12, Treasurer, Tennis 10- 
12, Yerbook 10-12, Z-Club 9-12, Pres., Just 
Us 11, Float Comm. 11-12, Powderpuff 12, 
Girls' State, National Honor Society 11-12, 
Executive Comm. 12, Clothing Finalist 10 

SULLIVAN, KAREN 

SUMMERS, DAWN 
Liberator 10-12 

SWEM, KEVIN 

SWINEFORD, RANDY 
Swim Team 11, Soccer Team 11,12, Natu- 
ralists Club 12 

TABOR, CHARLOTTE 

Deca, Nat. Club 10, Stage Crew 10,11, Stu- 
dent Council 11, Patriettes 11 

TAYLOR, DONNA 

Cheerleader 10-12, Nat. Club 10,12, Spe- 
lunking Club 9, Powderpuff 

TAYLOR, LINDA 




K. SULLIVAN 



D SUMMERS 








K. SWEM 



R. SWINEFORD 



D. TAYLOR 




TAYLOR, MIKE 

TEAL, JANICE 

THOMAS, STEVE 

Basketball 10-12, Lettermans Club 11,12, 

Student Coun. 10,11, Baseball 10-12 

THOMPSON, TED 

TODD, LINDA 

Powderpuff Patriettes 11-12, cap. 




M. TAYLOR 



J. TEAL 



S. THOMAS 



T. THOMPSON 





TODD, SHERRY 
TOWERS, TERRY 



TURNER, BARBARA 
Nat. Club 



TURNER WILLIAM 
Bowling 9,10 



VINCEL, DOTTY 

Drama 10-12, Nat. Club 10-12, Pats on Pa- 
rade 10-12, Z-Club 9,10 




T. TOWERS 



B. TURNER 




C. WALKER 



B. WALLS 



J. WALTERS 




WALKER, CAROL 

WALLS, BRENDA 

Nat. Club 9-12, Prom. Comm. 12, Science 
Sem., 11, Tennis 10-12, Yearbook 9-12, 
Float Comm. 9-12, Powderpuff, Home- 
coming Queen Cand. Photography, Mat- 
maids 9 

WALTERS, JIM 

WALTON, MIKE 

WEAVER, MARK 



WEAVER, ROBERT 

WELCH, PAM 

Nat. Club 10-12, Student Coun. 9-11, Z- 

Club 11, Powderpuff 

WERTENBERGER, ERNEST 

WEVER, KAREN 

Nat. Club 10-12, Prom. Comm. 12, Tennis 
9-12, Volleyball 9-12, Z-Club 10-12, Nat. 
Honor Society 12, Altrusa Award 

WHALEN, MARTHINDA 




B. WEAVER 



E. WERTENBERGER 



M. WHALEN 

Seniors/141 




K. WHEELER 



C. WHITE 



WHEELER, KARRI 

WHITE, CLIFFORD 

WHITE, DORCAS 

Cheerleader 9-12, Naturalists Club 10-12, 
Office Messenger 11-12, Student Council 
11-12, Powderpuff Football, Homecoming 
Queen Candidate 

WHITE, ERIC 

WHITE, TINA 

Cheerleader 9-12, Naturalists Club 10-12, 
Marching Band 11, Patriots on Parade 9, 
Science Seminar 10,12, Float Committee 9- 
10, Powderpuff Football 




E. WHITE 



T. WHITE 




WICKWARE, DIANNE 

WIGHT, SANDRA 

Office Messenger 11, Patriots on Parade 12 

WILKERSON, BENITA 

Spanish Club 11-12, Powderpuff Football 

WILLIAMS, ERIC 

Football 10, P.E. Assistant 11-12 

WILLIAMS, MIKE 

Naturalists Club 11, Newspaper 10-12, Ten- 
nis 12 




D. WICKWARE 



S. WIGHT 



B. WILKERSON 



E. WILLIAMS 



M. WILLIAMS 




S. WILLIAMS 



V. WILLIAMS 



D. WILSON 



E WITHERS 



V. WILLIAMS 




G. WOOD 




WILLIAMS, SUE 

Patriots on Parade 11, Science Seminar 10, 

Spanish Club 9-10 

WILLIAMS, VICKI 

Cheerleader 9-12, Naturalists Club 9-10, 
Prom Comm. 12, Patriots on Parade 10, 
P.E. Assistant 11-12, Track 9, Float Comm. 
9-12, Powderpuff Football, Queen Candidate 
for Homecoming, Girls gymnastics team 12. 

WILLIAMS, VIRGINIA 

Athletic Managers 12, Bowling League 11, 

Naturalist Club 10-11 

WILLIAMS, WILLIAM 

WILSON, ANGELIA 

WILSON, DANNY 

Naturalist Club 10-11, Photography Club 12 

WITHERS, EVA 

Spanish Club 9-10, Track 9, Voice of De- 
mocracy 10, Speech Award 10 

WOOD, GREGG 

Naturalists Club 10, German Club 9,10,11 

WORPELL, SCOTT 

Bowling League 11-12, Drama 12, Golf 
Team 9-11, Marching Band 9-10, Natural- 
ists Club 10-12, Quill and Scroll 12, Student 
Council 10-12, Yearbook 10-12, President 
of the mock election 

WRAY, BOB 

WRIGHT, MARTHA ELLEN 
Art Club 11, Naturalists Club 10-12, Pho- 
tography Club 12, Quill and Scroll 11-12, 
Spanish Club 11-12, Student Council 11-12, 
Yearbook 10-12, Z-Club 10-12, Float 
Comm. 11-12, Pres. Quill & Scroll, Musical 
Makeup Crew 11-12, Z Club Executive 
Board 12, Student Council Cabinet 12, Tri- 
Editor in Chief yearbook 12 

YORK, TERRY 

YOUNG, DENNIS 
Yearbook 10, Deca Club 12 

MARVIN 





M. WRIGHT 



T. YORK 



MARVIN 



142/Seniors 





Seniors/143 




* * * * 



* * * 



3 13 j H^TT^rrrn 
i^^jj^^i i] i m i ii n ii 























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| 





* j 



f*A 



it it it it 



bi?i?-kizTkTkfcizi?i?iz 



Looks like we made it! 



2f 






Alcorn, Sandy 
Allen, Danita 
Allen, Terry 
Anderson, Ethel 
Anslow, Linda 
Arnold, Bill 
Arnold, Greg 



Arnold, Kathy 
Arnold, Mike 
Arnold, Mike 
Baker, Cindy 
Baker, Terri 
Bales, Cindy 
Barcus, Debbie 



Banes, Mitch 
Barnes, Robin 
Bock, Brian 
Beedie, Glenda 
Bennett, Debbie 
Bennett, Sharon 
Berry, Robert 



Birdsong, Lynette 
Black, Tracy 
Blake, Melissa 
Blackwell, Sherry 
Blunt, Karl 
Bottorff, Cheri 
Boughton, David 



146/Juniors 




Boyd, Thelma 
Bradford, Monica 
Bramell, Susan 
Brezausek, Linda 
Brown, Ken 
Brown, Loretta 
Brown, Mark 
Browning, Dave 

Bruning, Lori 
Bryan, Carol 
Bryant, Robert 
Bryant, Shannon 
Burchum, Jim 
Burgess, Sharon 
Burkett, Jackie 
Burleson, Jay 

Burnam, Cathy 
Burnell, Jim 
Bush, Gina 
Bush, Julie 
Buste, Alejandre 
Byrd, Rochelle 
Carsen, Thomas 
Castor, Tracie 

Carter, LaWanda 
Cawson, Alice 
Chalupa, Helena 
Chan, Vanessa 
Chapman, Debbie 
Chapman, Diane 
Chapman, Sonja 
Cheatham, James 

Chilton, James 
Christensen, Pennie 
Church, Becky 
Chiquez, Robin 
Clardy, Sherry 
Clements, Alan 
Colbert, Robert 
Cook, Karolina 

Copes, Marilyn 
Cottrell, Joni 
Couse, Kim 
Cox, Mona 
Crabtree, Judy 
Crouch, Mary 
Curry, Linda 
Cutshaw, Jim 

Daugherty, Tammra 
Davidson, Curtis 
Davis, Evernard 
Davis, Gary 
Davis, Linda 
Dennis, James 
DeVore, Theresa 
DeVore, Tom 

Diehl, David 
Dixon, Rena 
Dobbs, Don 
Dodd, Stephanie 
Dodds, Jim 
Degner, Dianna 
Doles, Dwayne 
Donel, Robert 

Dorsett, Steve 
Duncan, Steve 
Dunlop, Michelle 
Dunn, BaRon 
Durham, Darcy 
Eddleman, John 
Edwards, Sindy 
Elliott, Lisa 



Juniors/147 




Ellis, Delia 
Endsely, Chandra 
Everman, Margaret 
Fair, Tina 
Featherings, Gene 
Fee, Glenna 
Ferdon, Sandra 



Fielding, Julie 
Fillenwarth, Diane 
Finger, Kim 
Fish, Ed 
Fish, James 
Floyd, Antonio 
Flynn, Nancy 



Foreman, Arvin 
Foster, Wanda 
Fowler, Bill 
Fowlkes, Vickie 
Franklin, Ron 
Freeman, Wanda 
Fulton, Shari 



Fultz, Joe 
Gerber, Vicki 
Gibbon, Joy 
Gillispie, Tina 
Goldman, Greg 
Gordon, Errol 
Gorman, Eric 








148/Juniors 





Grant, Valerie 
Graves, Sheryl 
Gray, Wayne 
Gregory, Tommy 
Griffen, Elisa 
Grisom, Stacey 
Guitterez, Pete 
Hadley, Annette 

Hall, Theresa 
Hallam, Denny 
Halliburton, James 
Harner, Debbie 
Hartman, Ricky 
Haskett, Shelley 
Hatcher, Jacqueline 
Hawthorne, Kathy 

Hayse, Lisa 
Heines, Steve 
Hemmer, Jeff 
Henry, Cornelius 
Hicks, Steve 
Hicks, Tina 
Hinman, Carolyn 
Hoffman, Rick 

Hohlenberger, Cary 
Holdead, Carl 
Holden, Mary 
Hopkins, Charles 
Hopkins, Jeff 
Hopkins, Nick 
Horton, Lee Ann 
Hoskins, Leon 

Houck, Elaine 
Howard, D'Jaris 
Howe, Lorraine 
Hoy, Jay 
Hudson, David 
Hudson, Tonya 
Huff, Alfred 
Hulett, Jayne 

Hunter, Jill 
Huston, Jim 
Icard, Lois 
Inman, Don 
Irwin, James 
Isaacson, Elizabeth 
Jennings, Sally 
Johnson, Char 



Juniors/149 



Johnson, Crystal 
Johnson, Joy 
Johnson, Mavis 
Jones, Brenda 
Jones, Charlene 
Jones, James 
Jones, Judy 



Jones, Marlene 
Jones, Tara 
Jordan, James 
Judd, Vickie 
Kain, David 
Karklins, Andris 
Kaufman, Lori 



Keller, Kathey 
Kelly, Kim 
Kidwell, Mike 
King, Kim 
King, Randy 
Klingenhoff, Sabine 
Klutey, Jennifer 



Koons, Peggy 
Krug, Lisa 
Kuhn, John 
Lacey, John 
Lacy, Renee 
Law, Noel 
Lawson, Angela 



Leakeas, Charles 
Lee, Joyce 
Lemaster, Tonya 
Lessley, Danny 
Litsey, Debbie 
Louis, Evelyn 
Luster, Lesley 



Lutocka, Cindy 
Mackey, Larry 
Martens, Linda 
Martin, Peggy 
Martin, Randall 
Matula, Richard 
Mayes, Renee 



McCall, Mark 
McCarty, Kevin 
McClure, Yvette 
McCrackin, Prentice 
McCurdy, Mark 
McDonald, Jeff 
McDowell, Curtis 

McFarland, John 
McGillem, Marie 
Mclntyre, Sherry 
McMillan, Kathie 
McNew, Walter 
McPherson, Kevin 
Meer, Greg 



Merriwether, Danny 
Meyer, Kellee 
Miller, Becky 
Miller, Cheryl 
Miller, David 
Miller, Moe 
Miller, Tammy 




150/Juniors 





*^.*^ ¥M 





Mitchell, Lesia 
Moore, Donna 
Moore, Phillip 
Moore, Scott 







Moore, Terri 
Montgomery, Dulcini 
Montgomery, Rita 
Morgan, Lawrence 







Morgan, Leonard 
Morgan, Mary 
Morgan, Maury 
Morris, Jim 







V / 



Mulcahy, Matt 
Mundy, LaDonna 
Murff, Rick 
Murphey, Lisa 



I a 




Creators of Fine Class Rings, 
Awards, Graduation Caps & Gowns, 
Announcements & Diplomas 

3 Locations 

Don Hock 

1210 !\. Pay ton 

Indpls., Ind. 

46219 

359-2550 



Josten's Jewelry 

6349 IN. Guilford 

Indpls., Ind. 

46220 

In Broad Ripple 

251-9167 



Gary Long 

651 Brookview Dr. 

Greenwood Ind. 

46142 

881-2681 




J 









ys$ 







Murray, Judy 
Muse, Ernest 
Myers, Crystal 
Napper, Becky 




Newell, Robert 
Nickles, Venessa 
Nichols, Sally 
Opel, Melissa 




Orr, Rebecca 
Ostewig, Tari 
Owens, Ray 
Owings, Lisa 



Paff, Stacy 
Parnell, David 
Parsons, Lisa 
Pearson, Sherri 



Juniors/151 



Pennybaker, Lizzy 
Pipkin, Randy 
Pollard, Mark 
Ponto, Debra 
Porter, Tehani 
Powell, Michael 
Powell, Terri 



Presnell, Mike 
Preston, Steve 
Price, Michele 
Pritchett, Chris 
Probst, Pam 
Prunty, Tami 
Quarles, DeLoncie 



Richardson, Vicki 
Rickey, Kathy 
Ridenour, Kathy 
Rifner, Mary 
Roark, Maria 
Roberts, Dennis 
Robertson, Carolyn 



Roell, Joni 
Rose, Mary 
Rowe, Marvin 
Rowley, David 
Royce, Lynne 
Rudicel, Chris 
Rushton, Bill 



Russell, Dillwill 
Russell, Joan 
Raider, Kim 
Ragen, Lynda 
Ranger, Jim 
Ranger, Laura 
Reed, Bridgette 





ATTENTIVELY taking notes, these juniors don't seem to notice that they are being watched by outsiders. 



152/Juniors 




POR TRAITS BY PA ULA 



Juniors/153 



rr; 



'Every financial 

service 

you '11 ever need is 

available through 

the 



AFNB 



American Fletcher 
National Bank 



Member FDIC 



38th & Mitthoeffer Rd. 
Banking Center 



10050 East 38th Street 



Redden, Kevin 
Reed, Lisa 
Reed, Lori 
Reid, Shirley 



Satterfield, James 
Schantz, Debbie 
Scheibelhut, Joe 
Scisney, Phyllis 



Scott, Larry 
Sexton, David 
Shafer, Lisa 
Sharkey, Maria 



Sharp, Martin 
Shaw, Don 
Shaw, Harriette 
Shelton, Chris 




LYNN Royce, Patriette, gives her all to pep up the crowd dur- 
ing a game. 




Shepard, Ray 
Shinkle, David 
Shirley, Reginald 
Shockly, Cassandra 



Skelley, Janet 
Sluss, Becky 
Smith, Beverly 
Smith, Curtis 



Smith, David 
Smith, Nina 
Smith, Richard 
Smith, Ronny 



Smith, Shari 
Snow, Marvin 
Spencer, Charles 
Stephens, Danny 




154/Juniors 





Stephenson, Jill 
Stevens, Lisa 
Stone, Forrest 
Stover, Brenda 
Stothmann, Richard 
Stuart, Cathy 
Stubbs, Pam 
Sutton, Micah 

Talley, Damita 
Tarter, Robert 
Tate, Angie 
Taylor, Greg 
Taylor, Slick 
Taylor, Tammy 
Taylor, William 
Theyssen, Patti 

Thrasher, Thersa 
Tiffany, Cheryl 
Turner, Mary 
Turner, Sharon 
Toliver, Forest 
Trent, Becky 
Utter, Elaine 
Valentine, Debra 

Valentine, Norman 
Vardiman, Kevin 
Vincent, David 
VonAxelson, Denise 
VonBurg, Kent 
Wablington, Daisy 
Wablington, Doris 
Wade, Duane 

Wade, Tim 
Wade, Tom 
Wadlington, Daisy 
Wagner, Sara 
Walls, Steve 
Waters, Jenny 
Waters, Monique 
Watson, Susan 



Juniors/155 



Weaver, David 
Webb, Christie 
Weeks, Dawna 
Weidman, James 
Weiglein, Linda 
Welch, Robert 
Warner, Patricia 



Wert, Kimberly 
Wesler, Greg 
Westerfield, Beverly 
Whaling, Dan 
Wheeler, Frank 
Wheeler, Kelly 
White, Angela 



White, Kim 
White, Lisa 
White, Sheila 
Wienke, Mark 
Willan, Larry 
Williams, Dave 
Williams, Jo 



Williams, Kathy 

Williams, LaDonna 

Williams, Robert 

Williams, Robert 

Williams, Robin 

Williams, Rudy 

Williams, Terri 



Willis, Tim 
Willis, Richard 
Wilson, Bobby 
Wilson, Rick 
Wiseman, Kelly 
Witt, Carol 
Wolfe, Dion 



Woods, Cheryl 
Woody, Susanne 
Wray, Tracy 
Wright, Julie 
Yarling, Jay 
Young, Debbie 
Young, Michael 

























Sk 





«< 















\ 









SCHOOL'S out! Everyone pours from the school building as another day of classes ends. Some head for home, others either go to work or to 
nearby restaurants. 



156/Juniors 




Flowers 

by 

DICK 

BAKER 

7320 

Pendleton Pike 

547-3511 




^Ce 



/u&A<ru 



X«££s 



5255 N. Tacoma Street 

One Block East of Keystone Av. 

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Monday through Friday 

Instruction 
Blocking 
Finishing 



?r 



T Every financial 

service 

you '11 ever need is 

available through 

the 



AFNB 



American Fletcher 
National Bank 



Member FDIC 



38th & Mitthoeffer Rd. 
Banking Center 



10050 East 38th Street 



$MA 



Juniors/157 



Ackerman, Jim 
Ackles, Tony 
Adams, Dana 
Adams, John 
Adams, Tarita 
Ahlefeld, Richard B. 
Aitken, Pam 



Allen, Mike 
Anderson, Lisa J. 
Anderson, Stacy A. 
Anderson, Tony W. 
Armour, Theresa A. 
Arnold, Debbie 
Arnold, Jeff 



Arnold, Michael E. 
Atkins, Marci 
Atkins, Michelle 
Averill, Kenny L. 
Ball, Dorria 
Ballance, Jenine 
Baker, Janice 



Barkdull, Mitch 
Barnett, Monica 
Bartholemew, David 
Baynes, Mary 
Beck, Kelly L 
Beechler, David 
Berry, James 




■Hi 










1 


■m> 






1 ■ 














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>/■ 


tf!»v Ja ^v "M 






# 













BIOLOGY teacher Mr. Forsyth 
explains DNA to melanie Coulter. 

SOPHOMORE Michael Hill exam- 
ines cells under a biology 
microscope. 

HOME Economic students pa- 
tiently await the completion of 
their project meal. 




158/Sophomores 




Berry, Randy 
Biddy, Jonathon 
Birggs, Nancy 
Birkla, Joe 
Blackard, Laura 
Blakeslee, Dan 
Blanchard, Alan 
Bowling, Ellen 

Boyer, Ronnie 
Bradford, Keith 
Bradford, Patty 
Bradford, Wayne 
Bradshaw, Barbi 
Brangan, David 
Branham, Franklin 
Brazzel, Russel 

Brewington, Sandy 
Brewster, Beverly 
Bright, Cynthia 
Brinkley, Jim 
Britton, Mary 
Bronstrup, Greg 
Brooks, Doyle 
Brooks, Linda 

Brown, Amy 
Brown, Charlette 
Brown, Janetta 
Brown, Julie 
Brown, Lisa 
Brown, Rick 
Bumpas, Ronald 
Burk, Patty 

Burkes, Charles 
Butler, Darleen 
Butler, Lionel 
Campbell, Judy 
Campbell, Yumi 
Cannon, Leisha 
Capone, Huey 
Carder, Darlene 

Carder, Marlene 
Cardwell, Monica 
Carey, Darrell 
Carroll, Patrick 
Casey, Cathy 
Casky, Brent 
Casky, Monique 
Chapman, Jennifer 

Chilcote, Cindy 
Christner, Melinda 
Clardy, Steve 
Clark, Mike 
Clark, Wayne 
Clay, Teresa 
Cline, Debbie 
Cline, Kellie 

Cobb, Terri 
Colbert, Robin 
Collins, Georgia 
Cool, Dennis 
Copperwood, Loretta 
Cosby, Preston 
Couch, Norman 
Coulter, Melanie 

Cox, Dan 
Creek, Kerry 
Cronin, Cathy 
Cuchna, Mike 
Cunningham, Amy 
Cutshaw, John 
Danaher, Anthony 
Daughtery, Tim 



Sophomores/ 159 



f^Cafc^Heid^berg ^ 



c 





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SPACEAGE TV & RADIO SERVICE 

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Discount to senior citizens 



3753 North 
Open Daily 



38th & Post 
9a.m. -7p.m. 



160/Ads 







Davids, Robert 
Davidson, Richard 
Davis, Daryl 
Davis, Donnie 
Davis, Jay R. 
Davis, Patty H. 
Davis, Paul 
Davis, Terry L. 

Davis, Tonya 
Davison, Russel 
Derr, Kristy 
Detzler, Leah 
DeVore, Mary 
Dillon, Bill C. 
Disser, Lynne 
Dobbs, Randy 

Doles, Denise 
Douglas, George 
Douglass, Starla 
Drake, Cindy L. 
Duff, Robyn 
Dyer, David 
Edmondson, Efrem D. 
Edwards, Kim 

Ellis, Barbara A. 
Ellison, Judy 
Emmons, Kim 
Engelking, Nancy 
Erickson, Priscila 
Ervin, Brian 
Essex, Matt 
Evans, Linda 

Fairley, Jim 
Fenter, Eric 
Ferree, Mike 
Fillenwarth, Berne 
Fischer, Gary 
Fischer, Sherry 
Fisher, Lynn 
Fluharty, Joan 




HOME Economics students patiently await the 
completion of their project meal. 



Sophomores/161 



Forbis, Dawn 
Foster, Jeri 
Franklin, Vicki 
Fulkner, Eric 
Furbee, Kim 
Furgason, Kellie 
Gainey, Wes 
Garrett, Jeff 

Gatlin, Kathleen 
Georg, Darryl 
Gentry, Nikki 
Gerber, John 
Gholston, Lisa 
Gill, Lisa 
Gillard, Willie 
Gilliam, Greg 

Ginger, Karen 
Glotfelty, Brian 
Gold, Terri 
Goldman, Jerry 
Graat, Jean 
Grant, Chester 
Gray, Robert 
Gray, Sam 

Greenwald, Lisa 
Gruner, Paul 
Gutieiiez, Linda 
Gwaltney, Norman 
Haggins, Mike 
Hall, Brian 
Hall, Dianne 
Hall, Kim 

Hallam, Kerry 
Hammond, Paul 
Harman, Aiman 
Harris, Robbin 
Harris, Tracy 
Hartman, Clifford 
Harvey, Don 
Haskett, Brian 

Hawkins, Jerry 
Hayden, Kandy 
Hays, Cindy 
Hedges, William 
Hendricks, Jeff 
Henschen, Ronda 
Herr, Doug 
Hewlett, Gregory 

Hicks, Joanne 
Higgs, Robin 
Hill, Lisa 
Hines, Cindy 
Hobbs, Jeff 
Hobbs, Steve 
Hodge, Andy 
Hodges, Kevin 

Hoffman, Bob 
Holden, Scott 
Holmes, David 
Hougland, John 
Howard, Lisa 
Hubbard, Tina 
Hudson, Karl 







162/Sophomores 




Hull, Eric 
Hunt, Amy 
Hunt, Kevin 
Hurt, Stanley 
Huston, Paul 
Irvine, Keith 
Jackson, Arnold 
Jackson, Lorraine 

Jacobs, Chip 
II 



Mark 
Mike 



James, Bi 
Jarosinski 
Jarosinski, 
Johnson, Bernice 
Johnson, Dennis 
Johnson, Doug 
Johnson, Judy 

Johnson, Kathy 
Johnson, Shedrick 
Jones, Bruce 
Jones, Robin 
Jordan, David 
Kaufman, Jackie 
Keith, Sandra 
Kemble, Jimmie 

Kemitz, Ruth 
Kennington, Donna 
Kent, Rhonda 
Kerr, Jayne 
Kett, Edward 
Kim, Illhong 
Kinkade, Maria 
Kohler, Tim 

Knapp, Jay 
Knight, Scott 
Laners, Theresa 
Langford, Randy 
Lee, Cheryl 
Lee, Julie 
Lee, Reggie 
Lee, Sheri 



ABDELMALEK 

SPACEAGE TV & RADIO SERVICE 

WARRANTY SERVICE ON MANY NAME BRAND TV's AND STEREOS 



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AT OUR SHOP 




3753 NORTH POST RD. 



J 



898-5824 



38th and POST RD. 



Discount to senior citizens 
3753 North 38th & Post 

Open Daily 9a.m.-7p.m. 



Sophomores/163 



Lepscum, Jeri 
Lessly, Eddie 
Lewis, William 
Lindauer, Belinda 
Lindauer, Debbie 
Lightle, Julie 
Lines, Mike 
Litsey, Andrea 

Lloyd, Pam 
Lontis, Jeanette 
Louis, Jessica 
Lowe, Terry 
Lukich, Michael 
Lutocka, Beth 
McBride, Landon 
McCallister, Carolyn 

McCarty, Dennis 
McClennon, Tony 
McCoy, John 
McCurry, Scott 
McDonald, LuAnn 
McFarland, Lori 
McGill, Lenne 
McKinney, Mark 

McPherson, Linda 
McQuade, Sean 
Major, Nan 
Majors, Rick 
Marsh, Richard 
Martin, Brian 
Martin, Cindy 
Matthews, Orlando 



Manes, Gale 
Medford, Tom 
Mesiana, Joe 




164/Sophomores 




Meyer, Michael 
Miller, Cindi 
Miller, Donielle 
Miller, Richard 
Miller, Yvonne 
Mitchell, David 
Mobley, Barbera 
Moffitt, Grege 

Mogollon, Ric 
Moore, Joyce 
Moore, Mark 
Moore, Mark 
Morris, Leanne 
Mulcahy, Mike 
Murray, Valerie 
Myers, Reida 

Myers, Stephanie 
Neal, MaDonna 
Newman, Jeff 
Nowell, Bill 
Novotny, Jill 
O'Keefe, Joel 
Opel, Jeff 
Owings, Denise 

Padgett, Mary 
Paff, Doug 
Parrott, Brian 
Parrott, Eddie 
Pate, Aaron 
Paul, Rebecca 
Pease, Jacqueline 
Pedersen, Christopher 

Phillips, Dave 
Phillips, Sherry 
Phipps, Mike 
Pitcher, Lorrie 
Pinner, Pamela 
Ponto, Donna 
Powell, Craig 
Price, Scott 

Proffitt, Steve 
Purcell, John 
Pyles, Jeff 
Quinn, Vicki 
Quintero, Eddie 
Raker, Dale 
Ralston, Linda 
Retherford, Diane 

Reynolds, Vickie 
Richman, Steve 
Riley, Cherri 
Riley, Peter 
Riley, Thomas 
Rives, Hilda 
Roake, Mark 
Roberts, Cheri 

Roberts, Pete 
Roessler, Torrie 
Rogers, Shellie 
Roseburgh, Reg 
Rudd, Julie 
Rudd, Richard 
Rusomaroff, Mitzi 
Rutland, Terri 

Satterfield, Michael 
Sanderfur, Marti 
Scheibelhut, Rose 
Schlimgen, Matt 
Scott, Johnathon 
Sexton, Mark 
Shaffer, Julie 
Shanklin, Kim 



Sophomores/165 



Shelby, Theresa 
Shriver, Jeff 
Sicking, Charles J. 
Simmons, Jamie 
Simmons, Quentin 
Sheer, Donna 
Smith, Gary 
Smith, Joan 

Smith, Keith 
Smith, Larry S. 
Smith, Sheila 
Smith, Tammy 
Snodgrass, Derrick 
South, Mike P. 
Spangler, Ronnie 
Spaulding, Jim 

Spires, Sally 
Springer, Mark 
Squire, Jay 
Steele, Lee W. 
Steiner, Mary L. 
Stineman, Bill 
Stitt, Lisa 
Strange, Terri 

Stroh, Toni 
Strong, Debbie 
Strothmann, Robert 
Stuart, Kandi J. 
Stubbs, Chris 
Stuckey, Sherri 
Sutton, Philip 
Sutton, Debbie D. 



Surgeon, Jim D. 
Swinford, Dawna L 
Swineford, Diane 




166/Sophomores 



• i. 




l.*0 ft / ' Jzxf v ? 







Taggart, Jeff 
Tarter, Scott T. 
Taylor, Misty 
Terry, Carole A. 
Thomas, Mark A. 
Tilley, Judy C. 
Toney, Glynne 
Torrence, Keith S. 

Torres, Carrie L. 
Trabue, Nikki 
Tracy, Debra 
Trester, Jeff 
Triblet, James 
Turner, Kathryn 
Tuttle, Nick 
Twigg, Nile E. 

Utter, Dan 

Uhlenhakn, Jane 
Wade, Gerald L. 
Walker, Michelle 
Wall, Marsha 
Wallace, Pam 
Waller, Lori 
Wampler, Kathy 

Warfield, Wendy 
Weathers, Adrienne 
Weaver, Kathy 
Weeks, John 
Weir, Kathy 
Welch, Debra 
Welch, Lawana 
West, John 

West, Shelly 
West, Steve 
Wheeler, Doneva 
White, Felita 
White, Janelle M. 
White, Jim 
White, Robert 
Wilcox, Richard 

Wildrick, Pam J. 
Williams, Aretha 
Williams, Nancy 
Williams, Stephen 
Wilson, Terry L. 
Winship, Paul 
Wood, Candy 
Wood, Karen G. 

Wood, Karen 
Wood, Mike 
Woodruff, Darrell 
Vanatta, Richard 
VanDuyn, Brent 
Veller, Ron 
Venable, Beverly 



Sophomores/167 




Abbott, Debbie 
Ackerman, Shelly 
Adams, Kevin 
Adawaw, Jonathon 
Agee, Chris 
Alexander, Allen 
Alton, Doug 



Andrews, Floyd 
Anderson, Harold 
Armstrong, Rhonda 
Arnold, Diane 
Arnold, Lori 
Arnold, Tim 
Arrington, Linda 



Askren, Deborah 
Averill, Lori 
Bales, Susan 
Barelay, Barney 
Barnes, Steve 
Bastin, Teresa 
Bates, Jeff 



Bean, Juanita 
Beauchamp, Gary 
Beechler, Bruce 
Beedie, Jack 
Bellinger, Micheal 
Benberry, Audrey 
Benberry, Charles 





SUMMER band practice introduced many fresh- 
men into the JMHS activity program. Drummer 
Jamie Elliot learns his first routine as a Pat. 

Nearly 700 freshmen crowded the 
halls, but they soon learned how to 
fight the main stairs battle and to elbow 
others out of the way. Some of these 
freshmen still have to share lockers with 
other classmates. Others became 
stooped from carrying all of their books. 
Other problems that freshmen faced 
were academic. Some never learned to 
turn all their homework in on time. 

Freshmen take such classes as gym, 
orientation, math and English. Most 
have a 1-9 or a 1-8 period day. Many 
took advantage of the activity and 
sports program. In spite of all the new 
classes, the new teachers in a new 
school, the freshmen have survived the 
harrassment and teasing of up- 
perclassmen in their first year at JMHS. 

LISA Federspill, Sherry Mackey, Amy Cunning- 
ham and Michelle Ranz watching the end of the 
homecoming game are all experiencing a series of 
emotions. 



168/Freshmen 



Bennett, Tammie 
Berry, Tamara 
Bigham, Mike 
Bivens, Tracie 
Blacklock, Stanley 



Blanche, Jeffrey 
Blanche, Steve 
Bland, Michelle 
Boone, Carla 
Bowers, Glena 




Burdett, Kathy 
Burkett, Cheri 
Burns, Paula 
Burrell, Michelle 
Burton, Robin 



Byers, Mary 
Cain, James 
Campbell, Jeff 
Carder, Debbie 



Carter, James 
Carter, Monique 
Castor, Jayne 
Cathcart, Bill 
Cazares, Teresa 



Chalupa, Deana 
Chalupa, Donna 
Charpie, Jon 
Cheatham, Sharon 
Christian, Donna 



Freshmen/169 



Churchwell, Vetris 
Clark, Chris 
Clements, Angie S. 
demons, Clarence 
demons, Clarice 
Cleveland, Rhonda A. 
Cody, Brenda 



Collins, David 
Collins, Tracy A. 
Conners, Kenny 
Craig, Allison 
Crain, James 
Crawley, Kelly 
Crouch, Joyce 



Cruthird, Verenica M. 
Culley, Suzanne K. 
Cummings, Vanessa 
Daniel, Willie L 
Darling, Mike 
Daugherty, Jodonna 
Davis, Betty J. 



Davis, Daniel E. 
Davis, John 
Davis, William 
Day, Leah M. 
Deer, Kerry 
Denney, Brad S. 
Denney, Greg M. 



Dennis, BeLinda 
Dibbern, Julie 
Diehl, Cindi 
Dillon, Teresa 
Dishner, Aaron L. 
Donahue, Darby 
Donel, Narva 



Dorsey, Jeff A. 
Dorsey, Jim 
Dowdy, Sherry 
Duckett, Kimberly A. 
Duerson, Ruth 
Duncan, Sally 
Dunn, Phillip 



Duzan, Gina 
Dwenger, Angie 
Dye, Barb R. 
Easley, Michelle 
Edgar, Jeff 
Edmonds, Irene 
Elbernetta, Jeri 



Elder, William 
Elliett, James M. 
Ellison, Billy 
Emmert, Jerry D. 
England, Tim 
Enlew, Michelle 
Enechs, Steve E. 



Erickson, Tanya 
Everman, Retha 
Ezell, Kris 
Fanning, Peggy 
Federspill, Lisa D. 
Fee, David 
Feller, Renee 




170/Freshmen 




Ficklin, Kathy 
Fields, Kevin 
Finegold, Cari 
Finney, William 
Fischer, Anna M. 
Fish, Cathy L. 
Fish, Rod 
Fisher, Diane 

Fisher, Jeff L. 
Fleser, Frank 
Flowers, Vicki L. 
Forman, Diana 
Foster, Curtis 
Fowler, Aleatha 
Fowler, Arlitha 
Fox, Todd 

Franklin, David 
Freije, Faith 
Frost, Frank 
Galbreath, Elizbeth 
Gardner, Joe A. 
Garrod, Brenda 
Gibson, Lori L. 
Gilbert, Debra J. 

Gilstrap, Lisa A. 
Glaze, Cheryl 
Goldsmith, Marsett 
Gordon, Courtney, B. 
Gough, Brian 
Grace, Rosa 
Greene, Sam D. 
Griffin, Sheila V. 




MARSHALL Majorettes practiced long hours 
last summer to prepare for football games and 
half time. 



Freshmen/171 



Gutierrez, Gloria M. 
Hale, Bill J. 
Hall, Ricky 
Hall, Tony D. 



Hansen, Veronica 
Harder, Chris 
Harlan, Berry 
Harper, Keiley, A. 



Harvison, Robert 
Hatchett, Andre P. 
Hathaway, Linda 
Hendricks, Carla 



Hennessee, Tammy 
Henry, Tom C. 
Hickman, Vicky 
Hightower, Mark E. 



Hines, Pandora 
Hinman, Cathy L 
Hinson, Windy 
Hitchens, Ken R. 



Holcomb, Frank 
Holder, Liane 
Hope, Johnny M. 
Hornbeak, Faye 



Horton, John 
Houghland, Pam 
Hubbard, Bobby 
Hubbard, Marie 




Billy, Theo 
have plans 



Theopolis B. Clardy Jr., a senior 
drives a blood ambulance to 36 
hospitals throughout Central In- 
diana such as St. Vincent and Vet- 
eran's. Theo got the job because 
his father owns the blood ambu- 
lance, and he felt that his son was 
old enough to help out. 

He has had a job since March 
1977. Theo said that he likes driv- 
ing the blood ambulance and help- 
ing his father. 

He goes to the Indiana Region 
Blood Center on Meridian to pick 
up the blood and then takes it it to 
the hospital dispatched to him. 

Getting the right blood to the 
right hospital is a very demanding 
job. 

Evernard Williams Davis III, a 
junior, better known to his friends 
as Billy plans on majoring in com- 
mercial art in college. Evernard 
was in animation last year as well 
as this year. Evernard said that he 
likes drawing cartoon characters, 
and he will be on the "Big Blue 
Marble" a national television 
show. 

He received a letter from the 
head of the Art Board in In- 
dianapolis thanking him for par- 
ticipating in the Art and Hobbie 
Show. Billy has won a lot of differ- 
ent certificates and awards in dif- 
ferent art programs for his talent. 

He represented John Marshall 
last year in the Gift and Hobby 
Show because his teacher asked 
him if he would like to represent 
John Marshall at the fair grounds. 
He has taken all art available at 
Marshall, Commercial Art, Basic 
Art, and Photography. Billy is a 
straight "A" student in Art. 



172/Freshmen 




Hudson, David A. 
Hudson, Monica 
Hunt, Laura J. 
Hupp, Tony 
Hurd, Derrick M. 
Hutchison, Sandi 
Hutzler, Mike 
Ingraham, John 

Irwin, Cheryl V. 
Jackson, Felicia 
Jackson, Vince E. 
Jacob, Larry 
Jarosinski, Rita 
Jenkins, John A. 
Jennings, Bobby 
Johnson, Angela 

Johnson, Barbara 
Johnson, Linda M. 
Johnson, Kim 
Johnson, Mark 
Johnson, Sharon 
Johnson, Tarona 
Johnson, Tirapol 
Jones, Barbara 

Jones, Carmen D. 
Jones, Danny R. 
Jones, Joann 
Jones, Joel P. 
Jones, Julie 
Jones, Michael 
Jones, Stephanie 
Jones, Tom L 

Jordan, Claudia 
Jordan, Laura 
Judd, Michael W. 
Kain, Gary 
Kampf, Jill 
Kampf, Jim 
Kampf, Judy L. 
Kane, Chris 

Kaufman, Charlie R. 
Keevers, Willian W. 
Kelpis, Erik 
Kemp, Rohnda 
Kennedy, Mark L. 
Kett, Mark H. 
Key, Yolanda 
Kielblock, Bill M. 

Killebrew, Linda R. 
King, David 
King, Kevin 
King, Lori A. 
Kinser, Robert 
Kiper, Ron T. 
Klutey, Cynthia 
Knapp, Jay E. 

Kocher, Cindy L. 
Koors, Sally 
Kuhn, Jeannie 
Lacy, Charles W. 
Lacey, Lois 
Lake, Curtis 
Laners, Eva 
Lange, Veronica 

Leach, Leroy 
Lee, Mindy A. 
Lefevers, Sherri A. 
Liebrandt, Tanya 
Leslie, Greg A. 
LeVine, Angela 
Lewis, Danny 
Lillicotch, Karen 



Freshmen/173 



Linton, Cathy 
Lopez, Clifford 
Lott, Karolyn 
Lowe, Debra K. 
Lummis, John 
Lynch, George K. 
Mackey, Sherry 



Madden, Mary 
Mallette, Charlene 
Malone, Anthony 
Mangine, Brenda 
Marley, Michelle 
Martin, Jay 
Martin, Tonya 



Mastin, Kim 
Matthews, Julie 
Matthews, Linnie 
Matthews, Terry 
Mayes, Rhonda 
Mays, Sebrina 
McCall, Jimmy 



McCall, Karen 
McCarty, David 
McCord, Russel 
McCorker, Wanda Y. 
McCray, Danny 
McCurry, Mike L. 
McGarr, Bennie 



McGillem, Melissa W. 
McGinley, Susan E. 
McKinney, Jane A. 
McMillan, Tim B. 
Means, Donald 
Members, David 
Micheels, Richard 



Miles, Carey 
Miles, Wanda 
Miller, Linda 
Miller, Mary 
Miller, Missy 
Milligan, Daniel 
Mitchell, Christie 



Mittman, Julie A. 
Mebley, Pat 
Meffitt, Jeff L 
Moon, Jake 
Moore, Brain K. 
Moore, Lester, F. 
Moore, Linda 



Morgon, Edward 
Morin, Donald 
Morin, George J. 
Morris, Cheryl 
Morris, Sharletta 
Mulcahy, Marty P. 
Murphy, Julie 



Murrell, Charlotte 
Muse, Valeeta 
Musgrave, Wendy 
Moulder, Gail 
Mounts, Sandy 
Myricks, Jerome 
Napper, Lisa 




174/Freshmen 







Nash, Sherry D. 
Neal, Sheryl 
Nell, Grant 
Nelson, John V. 
Nevilles, Varinia F. 



Newman, Jacqi 
Nickell, Mike 
Noe, Threase 
Nolin, Lorri 
Nugent, Tim 



O'Conner, Denise 
Odgen, Teresa 
Outlaw, Michael D. 
Palmer, Eulonda 
Parham, Mary 



Parks, Kerry 
Patten, George T. 
Paul, Rachel 
Pauley, Mark 
Payne, Cindy 



Pearson, Derrick 
Peercy, Donna 
Perkins, Karen D. 
Perkins, Priscilla 
Peterson, Charles 



Petty, Monica 
Petrucciani, Tony 
Phelps, Edward 
Phillips, Chuck 
Pickens, Lucious 



Plummer, Debbie 
Portwood, Diane M. 
Powell, Calandra 
Powell, Keith 
Powell, Robert 



Presnell, Missy 
Price, Norman J. 
Pritchett, Susan 
Prebst, Jeff 
P runty, Jeff 



Freshmen/175 



Purcell, JaJuana L. 
Pyles, Angie 
Ragan, Lori 
Ramer, Linda J. 
Ramsey, Terri 



Reed, Julie 
Reed, Tammy 
Reever, Lori S. 
Rhodes, Greg 
Richards, Scott 



Richards, Shellie A. 
Richardson, Tim D. 
Richmann, Sandy M. 
Ridge, Kim 
Riley, Lynne 



Rippy, David B. 
Rives, Nadya M. 
Roberts, Steve 
Roberts, Todd B. 
Robinson, Richard 



Rochford, Lynne 
Rogers, Edward E. 
Rosenstihl, Shelly 
Rowe, Terri 
Rowley, Terri 



Royce, Chris 
Royce, Kevin P. 
Royce, Susan 
Ruble, Esther 
Rudicel, Sheila 



Ruhmkorkff, Paula A. 
Rusie, Debbie S. 
Russel, Edward 
Russell, Cero 
Russell, Mark 



176/Freshmen 





Russell, Pat J. 
Rynard, Sandy 
Sanders, Cheryl 
Sanders, Patrice 
Scott, Bob 
Scott, Christine C. 
Scott, Laura 
Scott, Michael C. 

Schofield, Robert 
Scruggs, Pamela 
Seaton, Quincy 
Sexson, J.B. 
Sheriean, Steve 
Shilling, Mike 
Shriver Steve T. 
Shull, Laurie 

Simmons, Eric 
Simpson, Myles 
Sinders, Ellen 
Skelley, Glen 
Slaughter, Tina 
Slinker, Kenny W. 
Smith, Betty L 
Smith, Jill M. 

Smith, Randy 
Snow, Darlene 
Sooss, Mark 
Spahn, Brian 
Spahn, Jonette S. 
Spencer, Pam 
Spradlin, Suzanne 
StaufTer, Doreen 

Stelmashenko, Lisa 
Stelmashenko, Vitalij 
Stemshorn, Stacy 
Stephenson, Marcia 
Sterrett, Anita 
Stevens, Brenda 
Stewart, Bill 
Stewart, Brian 

Stewart, Shelia 
Stoe, Marty K. 
Stokes, Brenda 
Stokes, Julie 
Stone, Ray L 
Striepens, Denise 
Stringer, Penny 
Stroh, Phil J. 



MANY Marshall students patronized the Band 
Booster's refreshment stand at the Indiana State 
Band Contest. The Boosters have worked hard all 
year to help finance the Band's expenses. 



Freshmen/ 177 



Stroot, Susan 
Stuart, Letitia L. 
Sullivan, Albert 
Sulzberger, Kurt 
Sutterfield, Rhonda 
Sutton, Joy 
Sutton, Kimberly J. 



Talley, Tracy 
Taylor, Jeff J. 
Taylor, Kevin S. 
Tayler, Paul 
Taylor, Robert B. 
Teal, Rick 
Terrell, Tamie 



Terry, Jean 
Thompson, Sheila A. 
Tilley, Sharon L. 
Tincher, Joni 
Todd, Yvonne 
Torres, Maria 
Tremain, Barb 



Turner, Katriece 
Turner, Lynn 
Tutrow, Gary W. 
Tyler, Youletta A. 
Tunes, Troy 
VanCleave, Diane 
VanDamme, Belinda 



VanDuya, Todd 
Volz, Loren 
Vonburg, Julie 
Wade, Freddie 
Wade, Issac 
Wagoner, June 
Walker, Denise 





178/ Freshmen 




Wall, Karon S. 
Wallace, Wendy 
Wampler, Carla 
Warner, Vince 
Warren, Tim 
Washington, Anita D. 



Washington, Terecia 
Washington, Teresa L. 
Washington, Tony H. 
Webster, Kym 
Weeks, Victoria 
Weisheit, Deborah L. 



West, Donnie 
West, Kim 
West, Krista L 
Westerfield, Kathy 
Wetzel, Jill 
Wheasler, Becky 



Whitfield, Greogory 
Whiles, Traci 
White, Christina 
White, Judy 
White, Sam D. 
Whitley, Daryl 



Williams, Carl C. 
Williams, Dale 
Williams, Shari 
Williams, Pannae 
Williams, Phoedra 
Williams, Natalie L 



Williams, Randy L. 
Williams, Wendy 
Williamson, John K. 
Wilson, Alison 
Wilson, Kim 
Winters, Andrew 



Winters, Bonita 
Winters, James 
Winthers, Christopher 
Witt, Jennie L. 
Wolf, Kim A. 
Wolf, William 



Wood, Kenny 
Wood, Tracy 
Yarbrough, William 
Yeakey, Calvin D. 
York, Vicki 
Young, Kerri 



Young, Mark 
Young, Robert 
Zeck, Kathy 
Zaring, Tracie 



Freshmen/179 



VARSITY FOOTBALL 






JMHS 

34 

21 

33 

20 

51 

7 
28 

6 


20 
28 



Jamboree 

Scecina 

Tech 

Howe 

Wood 

Lawrence Central 

Arlington 

Ritter 

Chatard 

Washington 

Roncalli 



FRESHMEN FOOTBALL 




JMHS 

34 

34 

38 

20 

24 

22 

20 

22 

30 



Tech 

Howe 

Wood 

Broad Ripple 

Arlington 

Ritter 

Chatard 

Washington 

Roncalli 




JV FOOTBALL 




JMHSlH^MI 

6 Tech 

14 Howe 

20 Lawrence Central 

13 Arlington 

14 Chatard 
13 Washington 
22 Roncalli 



k ^8F^ 



TENNIS 

City runner up 



Wood 

North West 

Howe 

Warren 

Lawrence 

Arlington 

Cathedral 

Scecina 

Broad Ripple 

Attucks 

Tech 

Tech 

Manual 

Shortridge 



GIRLS' TENNIS 



JMHS 

4 Warren Central 

Manual 

Broad Ripple 

Wood 

Howe 

Attucks 

Arlington 

Lawrence Central 

Scecina 

Beech Grove 

Perry Meridian 

Tech 



JMHS 




47 


Hamilton 


97 


Mt. Vernon 


94 


Arlington 


81 


Howe 


81 


Shelbyville 


60 


Tech 


58 


Franklin Central 


19 


Danville 


48 


Speedway 


39 


Howe 


80/Score 


blocks 



Opp. 

6 









BOYS' SWIMMING 



OPP. 

112 
58 
53 
39 

151 
23 
27 
63 
87 
45 



VARSITY BOYS' TRACI 



JMHS 

45 * 

54 

54 

81 

70 

58 

60 

37 

71 

71 

28 

64 

64 




Howe 
Manual^ 
Shortridge 
Lawrence North 
Franklin Central 
Chatard 

Greenfield Central 
Scecina 
Brebeuf ' : 
Arlington 
Lawrence Central 
Wood 
Broad Ripple 



Opp. 
82 
78 
27 
46 
57 
69 
67 
90 
61 
26 
99 
51 
44 



J.V. TRACK BOYS' 



Howe; 

Manual 

Shortridge 

Lawrence 

Chatard 

Greenfield Central 

Scecina 

Brebeuf 

Arlington 

Lawrence Central 

Broad Ripple 

Wood 



CROSS-COUNTRY 



JMHS 




39 


Pike 


19 


Wood 


42 


Greenfield 


42 


Franklin Central 


23 


Lawrence North 


50 


Southport j 


34 


Manual mM 


40 


Roncalli 


36 


Attucks 


56 


Chatard 


54 


Broad Ripple 


19 


Scecina 


45 


Cathedral 1 




GIRLS' TR 


JMHS 




63 


Scecina 


52 


Washington 


63 


Shortridge 


59 


Chatard 


73 


Franklin Central 


45 


Perry, Meridian 


86 


Beech Grove 


40 


Howe 


47 Vz 


Tech 



Opp. 
57 
33 
33 
86 
58 
69 
80 
84 
84 
78 
83 
83 



Opp. 
22 
42 
28 
45 
29 
15 
28 
54 
39 
37 
51 
45 
19 



VARSITY BASEBALL 



JMHS 



Opp. 




7 


Mount Vernon 


3 


6 


Manual 


7 


6 


Lawrence Centra) 


5 


5 


Lawrence Central 


8 


5 


Cathedral 


3 


5 


Southport 


7 


14 


Tech 


4 


3 


Neyv Baltimore (Mich) 


1 


4 


Columbus East 


6 


5 


Broad Ripple 


6 


6 


Warren Central 


1 


4 


Beech Grove 


1 





Latin School 


1 


2 


Howe 


1 


4 


Franklin Central 


3 


5 


Scecina 


7 


2 


North Central 


1 


1 


Ben Davis 


2 


2 


Chatard 


12 


7 


Bloomington South 


5 


5 


Roncalli 


1 


5 


Perry Meridian 
City Tourney 


4 


6 


Ritter 


1 


6 


Northwest 


4 


6 


Roncalli 


3 


2 


Chatard 

JV BASEBALL 


6 


JMHS 


Opp. 


4 


Manual 





8 


Lawrence Central 


3 


16 


Cathedral 


6 


7 


Southport || 


4 


16 


Tech 


3 


5 


Broad Ripple 


2 


1 


Warren Central 


9 


8 


Greenfield Central 


6 


5 


Beech Grove|| 


3 


7 


Latin Schoofll 


3 


13 


Ritter 


4 


2 


Franklin Central 


7 


5 


Scecina 


10 


7 


North Central 


3 


1 


Ben Davis 


2 


8 


Greenwood 


1 


6 


Chatard 


1 


FRESHMEN BASEBALL 


JMHS 


Opp. 


1 


Scecina 


2 


10 


Greenfield Cent. 


10 


1 


Tech 





15 


Attucks 


5 


10 


Lawrence North 


19 


3 


Howe 


13 


16 


Northwest 


2 


7 


Franklin Central 


5 


12 


Stonybrook 


11 


GIRLS' SWIM TEAM 




JMHS 


Opponent 


L 


Speedway 


W 


L 


Decatur Central 


W 


W 


Howe 


L 


L 


Shelbyville 


W 


L 


Pike 


W 


L 


Brownsburg 


W 


W 


Hamilton South 


L 


L 


Franklin Central 


W 


W 


Beech Grove 


L 


L 


Lawrence North 


W 


W 


Deaf School 


L 



BOYS' SOCCER TEAM 



JMHS 



8 


North Central 


7 


Lawrence Central 


7 


Cathedral 


12 


Roncalli 


9 


Plainfield 


10 


Perry Meridian 


6 


Heritage Christian 


5 


North Central 


8 


Carmel 


9 


Lawrence 


13 


Cathedral 


7 


Roncalli 


9 


Plainfield 


7 


Perry Meridian 


4 


Heritage Meridian 


VARSITY WRES 


JMHS 




L 


Mooresville 


L 


Carmet 


L 


Northwest 


T 


Manual 


L 


Howe 


W 


Washington 


W 


Greenfield 


L 


Scecina 


L 


Lawrence Central 


L 


Chatard 


L 


Tech 


L 


Perry Meridian 


L 


Cathedral 


W 


Broad Ripple 




J.V. WRESTL 


JMHS 




29 


Mooresville 


40 


Carmel 


22 


Northwest 


39 


Manual 


33 


Howe 


9 


Scecina 


43 


Lawrence Central 


43 


Chatard 


30 


Tech 


21 


Perry Meridian 


42 


Washington 


39 


Greenfield Central 


29 


Cathedral 


32 


Broad Ripple 




Opp. 

w 
w 
w 

T 
W 
L 
L 
W 
W 
W 
W 

w 
w 

L 



Opp. 
42 
27 
51 
27 
30 
60 
33 
36 
42 
45 
24 
42 
32 
6 



FRESHMEN WRESTLING 



JMI 


HS 


Opp. 


18 


Mooresville 


39 


24 


Washington 


39 


26 


Cathedral 


50 


34 


ML Vernon 


34 


18 


Shortridge fefeta 


39 


45 


Broad Ripple 

VARSITY GIRLS' 
BASKETBALL 


24 


JMHS 


Opp. 


42 


Warren Central 


65 


39 


Shortridge 


65 


33 


Broad Ripple 


49 


52 


Howe 


64 


44 


Plainfield 


61 


18 


Tech 


72 


38 


North Central 


54 


56 


Broad Ripple 


44 


33 


Tech 


92 


37 


Arlington 


35 


26 


Ben Davis 


61 


40 


Lawrence Central 


38 


30 


Washington 


74 


35 


Beech Grove 


54 


42 


Cathedral 


45 



VARSITY VOLLEYBALL 



JMHS 




L 


South port 


W 


Brebuef 


L 


Arlington 


W 


Wood 


L 


Chatard 


W 


Howe 


W 


Manual 


L 


Ben Davis 


L 


Attucks 


W ' 


Tech 


L 


Cathedral 


L 


Pike 


W 


Scecina 


w 


Washington 


L 


Perry Meridian 


W 


North Central 


L 


Beech Grove 


L 


Lawrence Central 


J.V. VOLLEYI 


JMHS 




W 


Southport 


W 


Brebeuf 


W 


Arlington 


L 


Chatard 


W 


Howe 


W 


Manual 


W 


Ben Davis 


L 


Attucks 


W 


Tech 


L 


Cathedral 


W 


Pike 


W 


Scecina 


W 


Washington 


L 


Perry Meridian 


W 


North Central 


W 


Beech Grove 


W 


Lawrence Central 

INVITATIOIS 


W 


Scecina 


W 


Tech 


W 


Roncalli 




GOLF 


JMHS 




246 


Tech 


170 


North Central 


207 


Warren 


213 


Ritter 


196 


Manual 


231 


Franklin Central 


217 


Howe 


169 


Warren 


419 


Lawrence North 


206 


Cathedral 


406 


Lawrence Central 


208 


Lawrence North 


205 


Chatard 


180 


Wood 


210 


Scecina 


306 


North West 


202 


Broad Ripple 


169 


Arlington 



Opp. 

w 

L 
W 

L 
W 

L 

L 
W 
W 

L 
W 
W 

L 

L 
W 

L 
W 
W 



OPP. 
L 
L 
L 

W 
L 
L 
L 

W 
L 

W 
L 
L 
L 

W 
L 
L 
L 



OPP. 
254 
161 
192 
208 
236 
233 
209 
150 
406 
205 
393 
213 
210 
220 
223 
342 
231 
182 





VARSITY BOYS' 






BASKETBALL 




JMHS 


Opp. 


83 


Warren Central 


58 


75 


Anderson 


86 


77 


Scecina 


78 


59 


Arlington 


61 


75 


North Central 


74 


75 


Manual 


79 


85 


Chatard 


72 


70 


Broad Ripple 


65 


77 


Franklin Central 


59 


66 


Northwest 


62 


66 


Shortridge 


62 


74 


Scecina 


69 


60 


Tech 


58 


58 


Washington 


74 


77 


Beech Grove 


71 


53 


Lawrence Central 


47 


76 


Roncalli 


56 


87 


Howe 


84 


76 


Attucks 


75 


80 


Wood 


92 


59 


Southport 


65 


67 


Shortridge 


59 


55 


Scecina 

J.V. BASKETBALL 


59 


JMHS 


OPP. 


41 


Warren Central 


45 


38 


Anderson 


63 


57 


Scecina 


36 


32 


Arlington 


37 


43 


North Central 


44 


42 


Manual 


50 


45 


Chatard 


43 


49 


Broad Ripple 


52 


45 


Franklin Central 


47 


38 


Northwest 


42 


41 


Wood 


43 


40 


Beech Grove 


30 


24 


Lawrence Central 


31 


26 


Roncalli 


27 


41 


Howe 


34 


41 


Attucks 


44 


35 


Wood 


31 


49 


Southport 


47 


46 


Shortridge 


36 



FRESHMAN 
BASKETBALL 

JMHS 

48 Lawrence North 
33 Lawrence North 
36 Shortridge 

43 Northwest 

24 Washington 

43 Cathedral 

45 Howe 

50 Franklin Central 

50 Ritter 

36 Manual 

50 Stonybrook 

39 Greenfield 

40 Woodview 

38 Chatard 

49 Broad Ripple 

39 Tech 
36 Arlington 
55 Wood 
39 Manual (city tourney) 

BOWLING 




OPP. 
49 
51 
39 
48 
34 
45 
49 
40 
42 
45 
47 
43 
29 
42 
62 
34 
38 
38 



JMHS 
28 




Shortridge 
Scecina 
Broad Ripple 
Howe 
Arlington 
Franklin Central 
Manual 

Warren Central 
North Central 
Lawrence Central 
Northwest 




INDEX 



Ackerman, D. 128 
Adams, D. 36, 39, 128 
Adams, J. 39, 98 
Adway, J. 61 
Agee, C. 61 
Agee, G. 28, 61 
Ahlefield, M. 124 
Ailes, K. 128 
Akins, M. 118 
Akles, D. 128 
Alexander, A. 61 
Allegree, S. 128 
Allen, A. 61, 128 
Allgood, D. 128 
Allseitz, E. 38, 128 
Allseitz, J. 128 
Alums, C. 38 
Anderson, H. 40, 41 
Archie, V. 128 
Arndt, S. 128 
Arnold, G. 52 
Arnold, M. 128 
Arnold, S. 128 
Arrington, L. 68 
Arthur, D. 128 
Averill, L 68 



B 

Bader, C. 128 

Baker, R. 128 

Band 40 

Ball, D. 114 

Bansbach, E. 128 

Barcus, D. 128 

Barkdull, S. 128 

Barnard, D. 128 

Barnett, M. 98 

Baseball 26, 27 

Basketball 73, 78, 79, 80, 81 

Bateman, B. 128 

Bates, P. 124, 128 

Batey, D. 128 

Baunsbach, J, 30 

Baxter, V. 128 

Beechler, T. 128 

Bell, E. 70 

Benberry, C. 61 

Bigham, M. 61 

Birdsong, L. 30 

Birkla, J. 6 

Bishop, B. 128 

Black, A. 41 

Black, R. 41 

Blackburn, K. 128 

Blackwell, A. 61 

Blackslee, S. 129 

Blanche, S. 61 

Blaydoe, F. 129 

Boehmer, W. 108, 129 

Bonebrake, D 129 

Bowers, G. 68 

Bowlby, J. 61 

Bowles, P. 129 

Bowling, 87 

Bowman, B. 129 

Boyd, A. 129 

Boyer, K. 129 

Bradford, W. 61 

Bradshaw, R. 129 

Bramcil, B. 33 

Breaziel, M. 129 

Brezausek, J. 68 

Brezausek, L. 98 

Brickens, M. 61 

Bridgeforth, L 129 

Bright, D. 129 

Brlstow, M. 15, 112 

Bronstrup, K. 129 

Brooks, T. 129 

Brown, C. 24 

Brown, C. 41 

Brown, D. 129 

Brown, J. 61 

Brown, J. 68, 114 

Brown, M. 39 

Browne, L 41 



Browne, T. 124, 129 
Brunelle, J. 61 
Bryant, S. 45 
Bultman, R. 61, 129 
Burkes, T. 32, 129 
Bureleson, J. 30 
Burnam, C. 96 
Burnell, J. 61 
Burns, J. 38, 129 
Burrus, A, 29 
Buttram, R. 129 
Butts, J. 129 
Bush, J. 72, 124 
Bastoga, A. 117 
Butler, L 41 
Byrd, R. 129 



Cain, C. 169 

Cain, J. 169 

Campbell, J. 169 

Carder, D. 169 

Carder, S. 28, 61, 129 

Carr, P. 129 

Carson, T. 23, 52 

Carter, J. 169 

Carter, M. 169 

Caruthers, D. 129 

Casey, D. 129 

Castor, J. 169 

Cathcart, W. 169 

Cazares, T. 169 

Cecil, N. 129 

Chalupa, B. 129 

Chalupa, D. 169 

Chalupa, D. 169 

Chapman, J. 98, 100 

Charpie, J. 169 

Cheatham, M. 108, 116, 121, 

122, 124, 130, 96 
Cheatham, S. 169 
Cheerleading 76, 77 
Christensen, L 30 
Christian, D. 169, 130 
Cross Country 52, 53 
Church, M. 124, 130 
Churchwell, V. 170 
Clark, C. 170 
Clark, K. 130 
Clark, S. 130 
Clark, W. 61 
Clements, A. 170 
Clements, T. 26, 130 
Clemons, C. 170 
demons, C. 170 
Cleveland, R. 170 
Cody, B. 170 
Coleman, D. 130 
Collins, D. 170 
Collins, D. 170 
Collins, M. 130 
Collins, T. 170 
Conely, T. 130 
Conners, K. 170 
Conner, P. 130 
Cox, L. 130 
Craig, A. 170 
Crain, J. 170 
Crawley, K. 170 
Crawley, T. 98, 130 
Crittenden, B, 130 
Crockett, R. 130 
Cromwell, P. 122, 130 
Cross, J, 28, 61, 130 
Crouch, D. 98, 130 
Crouch, J. 170 
Crouch, M. 98, 124 
Cruthird, V. 170 
Culley, S. 170 
Cummings, V. 170 
Cutshaw, J. 98 



D 

Dalton, G. 130 
Daniel, W. 170 
Darling, C. 34, 130 
Darling, M. 170 
Daugherty, J. 170 
Daugherty, T. 61 
Daugherty, T. 114 
Davenport, R. 130 
Davids, R. 28, 29 
Davis, B. 130 
Davis, D. 170 
Davis, E. 130 



Davis, G. 39 

Davis, J. 61 

Davis, J. 170 

Davis, P. 108, 130 

Davis, W. 170 

Day, E. 39, 130 

Day, L. 170 

Deeny, J. 61 

Deer, K. 170 

Deer, K. 12, 130 

Degraphenreed, J. 22, 25 

Denney, G. 170 

Denney, R. 130 

Dennis, B. 170 

Dennis, J. 38 

Dennis, K. 130 

Devore, J. 28, 130 

Dibbern, J. 170 

Diehl, C. 170 

Dillon, A. 61, 131 

Dillon, T. 170 

Dine, B 9 

Dishner, A. 170 

Dittomas, R. 131 

Dodd, D. 131 

Donahue, D. 170 

Donel, N. 170 

Dorman, G. 131 

Dorsey, J. 170 

Dorsey, J. 61 

Dorsey, R, 26, 28, 61, 131 

Downton, T. 12, 131 

Dowdy, S. 170 

Duckett, K. 170 

Duerson, R. 170 

Duncan, J. 8 

Duncan, S. 170 

Dunlop, M. 115, 131 

Dunn, B. 38, 8 

Dunn, P. 170 

Duvall, M. 131, 39 

Duzan, G. 170 

Dwenger, A. 170 

Dye, B. 170 

Dye, M. 98, 131 

Dye, J. 131 



Early, V. 32 
Easley, M. 170 
Edgar, J. 170 
Edmonds, I. 170 
Edwards, Jack 28, 131 
Elbernetta, J. 170 
Elder, W. 170 
Eldridge, S. 131 
Elliott, J. 170 
Ellis, J. 124 
Ellison, C. 131 
Ellison, W. 131 
Emmert, J. 170 
Emperly, C. 131 
Emrick, S. 131 
Engelking, S. 98, 131 
England, T. 170 
Enlow, M. 170 
Enochs, S. 170 
Enochs, J. 131 
Erickson, Priscilla 68 
Erickson, T. 170 
Ervin, B. 61 
Everett, B. 30, 131 
Everman, R. 170 
Ezell, K. 170 



Fair, C. 131 
Fairley, K. 131 
Fairley, J. 68, 98 
Fanning, B. 124, 131 
Fanning, P. 170 
Farley, D. 124, 131 
Featheringill, Jo 61, 26 
Federspill, L. 170 
Fee, D. 170, 171 
Feller, Renee 170, 171 
Ferree, L 131 
Ferree, M. 61 
Ficklin, K. 170, 171 
Fields, K. 170, 171 
Fillenwarth, B. 61 
Finegold, C. 171, 170, 68 
Finning, W. 171, 170 



Fischer, A. 170, 171 

Fischer, J. 131 

Fischer, L 

Fish, C. 170, 171 

Fish, J. 61 

Fish, R. 170, 171 

Fisher, D. 170, 171 

Fisher, J. 170, 171 

Fisher, J. 61 

Fleming, L. 131 

Fleming, M. 104 

Fleser, F. 61, 171, 170 

Flowers, V. 170, 171 • 

Football 58, 59, 60, 61 

Fontana, D. 131 

Forbis, Darla 4, 44, 45, 98 

Foreman, K. 33 

Foreman, D. 170, 171 

Foster, C. 170, 171 

Fouler, A. 170, 171 

Fox, T. 170, 171 

Franklin, D. 170, 171 

Freije, F 40, 41, 170, 171 

French Club 49 

Frost, F. 98, 170, 171 

Furbee, K. 68 



Gainey, W. 30, 68, 98 
Galbreath, E. 170, 171 
Gardner, J. 170, 171 
Garrod, B. 170, 171 
Gentry, W. 30 
Gibson, L. 170, 171 
Gibbon, J. 108 
Gilbert, D. 170, 171 
Gillard, W. 60, 61 
Gilstrap, L. 170, 171 
Glaze, C. 170, 171 
Glotfelty, B. 52, 53 
Goldman, D. 124 
Goldsmith, M. 86, 170, 171 
Gordon, C. 170, 171 
Gosnell, J. 28 
Gough, B. 170, 171 
Grace, R. 170, 171 
Graves, C. 124 
Gray, G. 50 
Gray, R. 98 
Greene, S. 170, 171 
Griffin, S. 170, 171 
Guldner, K. 28, 33 
Guiterrez, G. 172, 173 



H 

Hale, W. 172, 173 
Hall, A. 172, 173 
Hall, B. 68 
Hall, D. 68 
Hall, R. 172, 173 
Hall, T. 124 
Hallam, D. 30 
Hammond, P. 61 
Hanson, V. 172, 173 
Harder, C. 61, 172, 173 
Harlan, B. 172, 173 
Harner, D. 124 
Harper, K. 172, 173 
Hartman, R. 61 
Harvisen, R. 172, 173 
Haskins, L 61 
Hatchett, A. 172, 173 
Hathaway, L. 172, 173 
Hawkins, G. 61 
Hawthorne, K. 40, 41 
Hayden, T. 20, 40, 41 
Hendricks, C. 172, 173 
Hendricks, J. 68 
Hennessee, T. 172, 173 
Henry, T. 172 
Henry, T. 58, 87 
Herr, D. 28 
Hickman, V. 172, 173 
Hidalgo, S. 12 
Hightower, M. 172, 173 
Hightshoe, J. 61 
Hines, P. 172, 173 
Hinman, C. 98 
Hinman, C. 172, 173 
Hinson, W. 68, 172, 173 
Hitchens, K. 172, 173 
Hoffman, R. 98 
Holcomb, F. 61, 172, 173 
Holden, S. 28, 66 



Holden, T. 30 

Holder, L 40, 41, 172, 173 

Holman, G. 61 

Hope, J. 172, 173 

Hopkins, C. 61 

Hopkins, N. 98 

Hornbeak, F. 172, 173 

Horton, J. 172, 173 

Hoskins, A. 38 

Houck, R. 87 

Hougland, P. 172, 173 

Houston, J. 98 

Hubbard, B. 61, 172, 173 

Hubbard, M. 172, 173 

Hudson Jr., D. 172, 173 

Hudson, M. 172, 173 

Hunt, L 172 

Hupp, A. 61, 172 

Hurd, D. 172 

Huston, J. 28, 30 

Hutchison, S. 172, 173 

Hutzler, M. 172, 173 



I 
Icard, L. 30, 68 
Ingraham, J. 40, 172 
Inlow, E. 112 
Irvine, K. 61 
Irwin, C. 172 



Jackson, A. 61 
Jackson, V, 172 
Jacob, L 61, 172 
Jacobs, S. 20, 21, 45, 98 
Jarosinski, M. 61, 78 
Jarosinski, M. 61 
Jarosinski, R. 172 
Jenkins, J. 108, 124, 134 
Jenkins, J. 172 
Jennings, B. 61, 172 
Jent, T. 124, 134 
Johnson, A. 172 
Johnson, B. 172 
Johnson, B. 124 
Johnson, D. 28, 134 
Johnson, K. 172 
Johnson, M. 172 
Johnson, S. 172 
Johnson, T. 172 
Johnson, T. 172 
Jones, B. 172 
Jones, C. 172 
Jones, D. 172 
Jones, J. 172 
Jones, J. 172 
Jones, J. 172 
Jones, K. 28, 60, 134 
Jones, K. 61 
Jones, S. 114, 173 
Jones, T, 173 
Jordan, C. 173 
Jordan, D. 61, 68 
Jordan, L. 173 
Joyce, J. 134 
Justus, S. 52 
Just Us 97 
Judd, M. 173 



K 

Kain, D. 108 
Kain, G. 173 
Kamph, J. 173 
Kamph, J. 173 
Kane, C. 173 
Kane, J. 30, 124, 134 
Kaufman, C. 173 
Keaffaber, R. 30, 134 
Keevers, W. 173 
Keith, K. 134 
Keith, S. 68 
Kelpis, E. 173 
Kemp, R. 173 
Kendrick, M. 61 
Kennedy, M. 173 
Kett, E. 52 
Key, Y 173 
K. dwell, M 28 
Kielblock, W 173 
Killebrew, L 173 
King, D. 173 



182/Index 



King, K. 173 
King, K. 14 
King, L. 173 
Kinser, R, 173 
Kiper, L. 134 
Klutey, C. 173 
Klutey, J. 98, 124 
Knapp, J. 173 
Kocher, C. 173 
Koors, Sally 173 
Kuhn, J. 173 
Kuhn, J. 52, 66, 87 



Lacey, C. 61 
Lacey, L 173 
LaCroix, P. 67, 134 
Lacy, R. 30, 68, 98 
Lacy, C. 173 
Lake, C. 173 
Laners, E. 173 
Lange, V. 173 
Land, R, 134 
Landes, A. 134 
Law, P. 15, 135 
Leach, L. 118, 173 
Lee, C. 68 
Lee, M. 173 
Lee, R 163 
Lefevers, S. 173 
Leibrandt, T. 173 
Leslee, G. 173 
Leslie, S. 68 
Leslie, R. 38 
Lessley, D. 61 
Levine, A. 173 
Lewis, D. 61, 98, 173 
Liberty Belles 38 
Lillicotch, D. 173 
Linton, C. 174 
Uoyod, P. 68 
Lopez, C. 174 
Lott, D. 174 
Lowe, D. 174 
Lummis, J. 174 
Lutocka, C. 39, 79 
Lutocka, S. 135 
Lynch, L. 10, 135 



M 

Mackey, S. 174 
Madden, M. 174 
Maddox, L. 175 
Mallete, C. 174 
Malone, A. 174 
Malone, S. 12, 30, 135 
Mangine, B. 174 
Mansfield, L. 135 
Marleg, K. 135 
Marley, M. 174 
Marshellaires, 37 
Martin, J. 174 
Martin, K. 32, 135 
Martin, K. 32, 135 
Martin, T, 174 
Mastin, K. 72, 174 
Matheson, D. 135 
Mathews, L 174 
Mathews, T. 174 
Matthews, J. 174 
Mattingly, M. 39, 98, 135 
Maxey, T. 135 
Mayes, R. 174 
Mayfield, P. 28 
Mays, S. 174 
McBride, L. 28 
McCall, J. 61, 174 
McCall, K. 174 
McCarty, D. 174 
McCord, R. 174 
McCorker, W, 174 
McCoy, J. 61 
McCoy, T. 28, 87, 135 
McCrackin, P. 61, 68 
McCray, D. 174 
McCurry, M. 174 
McDonald, D. 39, 135 
McDowell, C. 39, 52, 53, 135 
McDoeell, P. 34, 39, 135 
McFarland, J. 38 
McGarr, B. 122, 174 
McGiMem, M. 174 
McGinley, S. 174 
Mclnterney, M. 7 




McKinney, J. 174 
McKinney, T. 
McVea, J. 
McMillan, T. 174, 98 
McWilliam, G. 136 
Meade, L. 
Meals, T. 136 
Means, D. 174 
Means, R. 

Members, D. 11, 174 
Mendenhall, J. 
Meyer, D. 136 
Micheal, T. 136 
Micheals, R. 174 
Miles, C. 174 
Miles, W. 174 
Miller, D. 50 
Miller, M. 174 
Miller, L. 136 
Miller, L. 174 
Miller, M. 174 
Miller, R. 136 
Milligan, D. 174 
Mills, G. 136 
Mills, H. 
Miner, K. 136 
Mitchell, B. 136 
Mitchell, C. 174 
Mittman, J. 68, 174 
Mobley, P. 174 
Mogollan, M. 136 
Moffitt, J. 174 
Moon, D. 174 
Morre, B. 174 
Moore, E. 68 
Moore, L. 174 
Moore, L. 40, 41, 174 
Moore, P. 136 
Montgonery, M. 136 
Montgomery, P. 54 
Morgan, E. 174 
Morales, M. 136 
Morin, D. 174 
Morin, G. 174 
Morris, A. 
Morris, C. 174 
Morris, L. 66 
Morris, S. 174 
Morrison, C. 
Moulder, G. 174 
Mounts, S. 175 
Mulcahy, M. 174 
Murphy, J. 174 
Murphy Jr. T., 61 
Murrell, R. 174 
Muse, V. 174 
Musgrave, W. 174 
Myricks, J. 175 



N 

Napper, L. 175 

Napper, S. 137 

Nash, S. 175 

National Honor Society 123 

Neal, S. 175 

Naturalist 88 

Neer, Greg 137 

Nell, G. 175 

Nelson, J. 61, 175 

Nevilles, V. 175 

Newspaper 125 

Newman, J. 175 

Newman, J. 98 

Nickel!, M. 175 

Nicholson, P. 137 

Noe, R. 137 

Noe, T. 175 

Nolin, L 175 

Norris, L. 61 

Nugent, T. 175 





O'Conner, D. 175 
Ogden, T. 175 
Oper, J. 124 
Orchestra 41 
Owens, D. 61, 137 
Outlaw, M. 175 



Paff, D. 66 



Palmer, E. 175 
Parham, M. 175 
Parks, K. 175 
Parrott, E. 28, 137 
Partridge, E. 98, 137 
Patriettes 20 
Patton, G. 175 
Paul, R. 175 
Pauley, M. 175 
Payne, C. 175 
Payne, P. 137 
Pearson, D. 175 
Pease, J. 70 
Peercy, D. 175 
Perkins, K. 175 
Perkins, P. 40, 68 
Perry, A. 137 
Peterson, C. 175 
Petrucciani, A. 175 
Petty, M. 175 
Phelps, E. 61, 175 
Phelps, L. 25, 137 
Phipps, M. 98 
Phillips, A. 40, 41 
Phillips, C. 61, 175 
Phillips, D. 61 
Pickens, L 175 
Poddal, G. 118, 175 
Pollard, M. 61, 137 
Pompey, M. 61, 137 
Ponto, D. 124 
Portwood, D. 137, 175 
Posley, B. 137 
Powell, C. 175 
Powell, K. 175 
Powell, R. 175 
Prebst, B. 61 
Presnell, M. 175 
Preston, S. 98 
Price, J. 68 
Price, N. 175 
Pride, H. 98, 137 
Pritchett, C. 28, 30 
Pritchett, S. 175 
Probst, J, 175 
Prunty, J. 175 
Prunty, T. 36 
Purcell, J. 30 
Purcell, J. 176, 177 
Pyles, A. 176 



Quinn, V. 40, 41 
Quiz Team 116 



Ragan, L. 176 
Ramer, L. 176 
Ramsey, T, 176 
Ranger, J. 104 
Reech, L. 61 
Reed, D. 30, 86, 137 
Reed, J. 176 
Reed, T. 176 
Reever, L 176 
Rhodes, G. 176 
Richards, S. 176 
Richards, S. 176 
Richardson, E. 106 
Richardson, T. 17fe* 
Richmann, S. 176 
Riddick, Michael 61 
Ridge, K. 176 
Rifner, P. 52, 53 
Riley, L. 176 
Riley, P. 98 
Rippy, D. 176 
Rives, N. 176 
Roberts, D. 98 
Roberts, S. 64, 66 
Roberts, Steve 176 
Roberts, T. 176 
Robinson, E. 38, 61, 138 
Robinson, R. 176 
Robinson, S. 138 
Rochford, D. 138 
Rochford, L. 176 
Rogers, C. 138 
Rogers, E. 138 
Root, A. 138 
Rose, M. 40, 138 
Rosenstihl, M. 176 
Routon, S. 138 






ROTC 108 
Rowe, B. 138 
Rowe, T. 176 
Royce, L. 20 
Royce, C. 50, 176 
Royce, K. 176 
Royce, S. 176 
Ruble, E. 68, 176 
Rudicel, C. 61 
Rudicel, S. 176 
Ruhmkorff, P. 176 
Rushton, W. 28 
Rusie, D. 176 
Russell, C 176 
Russell, E. 176 
Russell, M. 176 
Russell, P. 177 
Ryan, P. 138 
Rynard, S. 177 



Sandefur, R. 138 

Sanders, C. 177 

Sanders, P. 177 

Satterfield, M. 177 

Sausser, M. 52, 98, 124, 138 

Sears, S. 138 

Schlimgen, M. 61 

Scheibelhut, D. 138 

Schluge, D. 28, 60, 138 

Schofield, R. 177 

Schroder, K. 33 

Scott, C. 138 

Scott, C. 177 

Scott, L. 138 

Scott, L 177 

Scott, M. 177 

Scott, R. 177 

Scruggs, P. 177 

Sells, R. 138 

Seaton, Q. 177 

Sells, R. 138 

Sexton, J. 138 

Sexson, B. 177 

Shannon, M. 61, 98 

Shepard, R, 61 

Sheperd, J. 14, 96, 98, 139 

Shepard, S. 139 

Sheridan, S. 177 

Shilling, M. 177 

Shinkle, D. 60 

Shriver, S. 177 

Shockency, D. 139 

Shrontz, R. 139 

Shull, L. 177 

Simmons, E. 177 

Simmons, Q. 98 

Simpson, M. 177 

Sinders, E. 40, 177 

Skelley, G. 177 

Slaughter, T. 177 

Slaughter, T. 12, 22, 24 

Slinker, K. 177 

Smith, B. 177 

Smith, E. 139 

Smith, H. 139 

Smith, J. 177 

Smith, J. 30 

Smith, K. 139 

Smith, L. 139 

Smith, N. 118 

Smith, P. 139 

Smith, R. 177 

Smith, R, 124 

Smith, S. 68 

Smith, W. 36, 39, 44, 98, 139 

Snow, D. 177 

Soots, M. 177 

Southgate, M. 139 

Spahn, B. 177 

Spahn, J. 177 

Spencer, P. 177 

Speech 70 

Speights, E, 139 

Spires, Laura 35, 36, 44, 139 

Spradlin, Suzanne 40, 177 

Springer, K. 139 

Starks, B. 139, 44 

Starks, C. 139 

Starks, S. 139 

Stauffer, D. 177 

Steele, R. 139 

Steenberger, M. 139 

Stelmashenko, L. 177 

Stelmashenko, V. 177 

Stemshorn, S. 177 




Roger Schroder 




Donald Auston 




Bejamin Sanders 




Marjorie Christy 



COUNSELORS 



Index/183 



Stemshorn, S. 139 

Stephens, D. 28 

Stephenson, M. 177 

Sterrett, A. 177 

Sterrett, S. 139 

Stevens, B. 177 

Stevens, D. 124 

Stevens, L 39 

Stewart, B. 177 

Stewart, B. 177 

Stewart, K. 139 

Stewart, S. 177 

Stilt, R. 139 

Stockhoff, D. 28 

Stoe, M. 177 

Stokes, B. 177 

Stokes, J. 177 

Stone, R. 177 

Striepens, D. 177 

Stringer, P. 177 

Stoe, S. 141 

Stroh, P. 177 

Stroot, S. 178 

Stuart, C. 124 

Stuart, L 178 

Stucker, L. 30, 98, 124, 141 

Sullivan, W. 178 

Sulzberger, L. 178 

Sutterfield, R. 178 

Sutton, M. 61 

Swimming 56, 57 



Talley, T. 178 
Tarter, R. 96, 98 
Tarter, S. 98 
Taylor, J. 178 
Taylor, K, 178 
Taylor, K. 178 
Taylor, P. 178 
Taylor, R. 178 
Teal, J. 138 
Teal, R. 178 
Terrell, T. 178 
Tennis, 30, 31 
Terry, J. 68, 178 
Theyssen, P. 98 
Thomas, S. 28, 141 
Thompson, S. 178 
Tilley, S. 178 
Tincher, J. 178 
Torres, 68 
Todd, S. 141 
Torres, M. 178 
Track 24, 25 
Tremain, B. 178 
Turner, L. 178 
Turner, K. 178 
Tutrow, G. 178 
Tyler, Y. 178 
Tynes, T. 178 



Utter, D. 98 



V 

VanCleave, D. 178 
Vandamme, M. 178 
VanDuyn, B. 28, 30 
VanDuyn, T. 30, 178 
Vincel, D. 141 
Volz, L 68, 178 
Vonburg, J. 178 
VonBurg, K. 86 



w 

Wade, F. 178 

Wagoner, J. 178 

Walker, D. 178 

Wall, K. 179 

Wallace, Wendy 179 

Walls, B. 73, 124, 134 

Wampler, C. 179 

Wampler, R. 8 

Warner, V. 179 

Warren, T. 179 

Washington, A. 179 

Washington, Antoine 60, 179 

Washington, T. 61, 179 

Washington, Teresa 68, 179 

Weaver, K. 30, 98 

Weaver, R. 34, 39, 141 

Webster, K. 40, 41, 179 

Weeks, D. 40, 41 

Weeks, V. 40, 41, 179 

Weisheit, D. 179 

Welch, C. 68 

Welch, R. 61, 68 

West, D. 177 

West, K. 179 

West, Krista 179 

Westerfield, K. 179 

Wetzel, J. 179 

Wever, K. 135 

Wheasler, R. 179 

Wheeler, D. 124 

Wheeler, K. 142 

Whiles, T. 179 

White, A. 74 

White, C. 142 

White, C. 179 

White, D. 142 

White, E. 

White, J. 179 

White, J. 66 

White, K. 98 

White, S. 179 

White, Sam 142 

Whitfield, G. 179 

Whitley, D. 179 

Whyde, D. 28 

Wickware, D. 142 

Wight, S. 142 

Wiglein, L. 39 

Wilkerson, B. 142 



Williams, C. 179 
Williams, D. 179 
Williams, David 60 
Williams, E. 118, 142 
Williams, K. 30 
Williams, M. 30, 142 
Williams, N. 40, 41 
Williams, Natalie 179 
Williams, P. 179 
Williams, Phaedra 179 
Williams, R. 179 
Williams, Robert 39, 40, 41, 

112 
Williams, S. 179 
Williams, Stephan 60, 142 
Williams, V. 12, 142 
Williams, W. 179 
Williamson, G. 38 
Williamson, J. 179 
Wilson, A. 179 
Wilson, K. 179 
Wilson, R. 25 
Winship, P. 68 
Winters, A. 179 
Winters, B. 179 
Winters, J. 179 
Wiseman, K. 32 
Withers, C. 179 
Withers, E. 142 
Witt, J. 179 
Wolf, K. 179 
Wolf, W. 179 
Wolfe, D. 98 
Wood, G. 142 
Wood, K. 179 
Wood, T. 179 
Worley, K. 33 
Worpell, 124, 142 
Wray, R. 142 
Wrestling 83, 84, 85, 86 
Wright, M. 50, 98, 121, 124, 

142 



Yarbrough, W. 61, 179 
Yearbook 124 
York, T. 142 
York, V. 40, 41, 179 
Young, D. 104 
Young, D. 114 
Young, K. 179 
Young, M. 179 
Young, R. 179 



Zaring, T. 179 
Zukoiski, M. 33 
Z Club 98 




Mike Baker 




Carloas McDowell 




CALDERON 

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184/Index 



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188 /Acknowledgments 




(BKNOIEDGflEIITS 



he tri-editorship was a first at 
JMHS for the MARHISCAN. Martha 
Wright, Brenda Walls and Marcia 
Ahlefeld designed and led the 
production of pictures and copy for the 
1978 book. All attended I.U. for a two- 
week crash course in yearbooking. 

The task of publishing the book was 
carried out by Academics Editor Mark 
Sausser, Activities Editor Mary Crouch, 
Business Manager Brian Johnson, 
Senior Editor Lynda Stucker, Junior 
Editor Marie Church, Sophomore Editor 
Marguerite Montgomery, Freshman 
Editor Debbie Meyer and Photo Editors 



Julie Shepherd and Paulette Law. 
Sports Editors Brian Fanning and Scott 
Worpell worked especially long hours. 

Thanks go to staff members Michelle 
Dunlop, Angela Levine, Randy Fischer, 
Cheryl Morris, Debra Ponto, Joy Sutton, 
Jill Wetzel, Doneva Wheeler, Frank 
Wheeler, Kathy Weir, Bill Taylor, 
Rebecca Church, Arvin Foreman, Jerry 
Goldman, Greg Taylor, Cathy Stuart, 
Tammy Jent, Kathy Martin, Mark 
Bristow, Jeff Trester, Joe Bartlett, Julie 
Brown, Sherry Clardy, Sandy Emrick, 
Brian Bock, Jacqui Henry, Susan 
McGinley, Suzanne Spradlin, Pam Lloyd 



and Quentin Simmons. 

Thanks also to news staffers, 
especially Curtis Lake, Joan and Chris 
Kane, Mike Cheatham, Dawna Weeks, 
Donna Moore and Lynda Ragan. 

The yearbook is appreciative of 
special help from James Rodeheffer, 
Larry Stucker, Bruce Watterson, Mike 
Slabaugh, Dave Russell, Greg Shelton, 
Tower Studio, Larry Glaze and John 
Reinert. 

If it weren't for Jan Eberle, yearbook 
advisor, the yearbook wouldn't be the 
success that it has been. 



Acknowledgments/ 189 



»..» . 



•It • 



JMHS CROWD COMES 
TO AN END 

low the 77-78 school year is 
over and the JMHS CROWD is breaking 
up. The seniors will soon be spread all 
over the country but the underclassmen 
will return next year to build their own 
JMHS CROWD. Perhaps there will be 
more students, perhaps less, but it will 
never be the same. There are certain 
'78 memories that we'll never forget. 
The blizzard and the snow filled parking 
lots, the crammed basketball games, 
the energy crisis, sectional ball caps, 
"get ahead with Worpell," Thanksgiving 
at Spring Mill, the "Poncho" dunk, I.D. 
cards, dance cancellations, Chip's Elvis, 
"South Pacific", lunch at the golden 
arches, co-city football champs, city 
basketball runner-ups, parties, flower 
sales plus numerous personal memories 
for each student. Yes, this was the 
JMHS CROWD. 



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